Question about LaCie External USB 2.0 500GB 7200 RPM 500 GB Hard Drive

1 Answer

The power supply source is humming--buzzing? what does that mean?

I don't see the device when I plug it in the computer.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 11 Answers

If the noise is new then it would indicate a problem, probably age related and would suggest PSU failure is imminent, I had a similar problem with a charger adaptor recently unfortunately I didn't catch it in time and it damaged my device .....

Posted on Mar 24, 2014

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

C1000s hum/buzz on phantom power


possibly the microphone needs more power than your sound card can supply although I cannot imagine as the duet is a good piece of equipment.
Is the duet USB bus powered?
Have you tried another cable? Possibly one wire is defective which means that phantom power will superpose the audio signal. In this case you might hear a hum. By the way this results in 6dB of signal loss. This is why XLR plugs have 3 wires. If connected with a 1/4" jack it has to be a stereo plug (tip, ring, sleeve)

Mar 26, 2014 | AKG Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Audio buddy buzz


Background 50 or 60 Hz buzz can be radiated from nearby wiring or conducted. Grounding is important but that can also be a cause. I suggest you search accidental hum loops.

Poor or faulty power supply regulation or smoothing can inject a mains hum into audio. This would need checking with an oscilloscope which could also be used perhaps to help search for the source.
Radiated hum can be picked up and injected into high gain amplifier inputs and long leads, poor screening and impedance mismatch can make things much worse.

I haven't helped much but I hope I have given you food for thought and further research.

May 30, 2017 | M-Audio M Audio Audio Buddy Microphone

1 Answer

I have bought an optical fibre cable to connect from my jamo a305 to my new sony nx810 tv and im getting a buzzing sound, there are 2 optical fibre outputs on the back of the amp, which one do i connect it...


Have you looked at the manuals?

http://www.retrevo.com/search?q=sony+nx810

A TV won't run external speakers directly. Besides, the TV-related audio should originate at, say, the cable Box, and go straight to your (presumed) AV receiver for the best possible decoding and reproduction.


Buzzing is an analog phenomenon and is NOT carried by optical cable in any case.

Buzzing is usally AC line noise leaking into an un-shielded cable somewhere or a floating ground. If the AC plug is reversible, try that. Sometimes the buzz is from an attached device. Make sure all audio cables are plugged in tightly at each end and routed away from or at right angles to any power cords and away from other sources of strong magnetic fields like TV's. I've also seen variable track lights induce noise but it's usually minor.

Try rotating the power cord in the wall outlet.

If it still buzzes with no cables or anything external attached there's an internal problem.

Disconnect the input(s) and see if it hums in the absence of an audio source. A bad audio cable shield or unwisely-routed audio cables will allow entrance of unwanted signals from external power sources, magnetic fields, even dimmer-controlled track lights. Sometimes, simply reversing the orientation of the ac power plug can eliminate humming.

Reverse the cables Left to Right to see if it stays with the cable or the input channel. Follow it back to the source, isolating in the same manner. Eventually you will find the entrance point of the hum. Frequently a cable's ground will oxidize over time and simply removing and reattaching the cable with a twisting motion will re-establish the shield.

May 02, 2011 | Jamo A 305 Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

Buzzing sound when sub is on even without turning my amp on, if you can call me on my phone 909 938 9219 it be better for me thanks, i am little slow with my computer, please help


Buzzing is usally AC line noise leaking into an un-shielded cable somewhere or a floating ground. If the AC plug is reversible, try that. Sometimes the buzz is from an attached device. Make sure all audio cables are plugged in tightly at each end and routed away from or at right angles to any power cords and away from other sources of strong magnetic fields like TV's.

Disconnect the input(s) and see if it hums in the absence of an audio source. A bad audio cable shield or unwisely-routed audio cables will allow entrance of unwanted signals from external power sources, magnetic fields, even dimmer-controlled track lights.
I've also seen variable track lights induce noise but it's usually minor.

Try rotating the power cord in the wall outlet.

If it still buzzes with no cables or anything external attached there's an internal problem.

Apr 30, 2011 | KEF Audio PSW 2150 Speaker

1 Answer

BUZZING NOISE LIKE 60 CYCLE HUM, CHECKED CORDS AND MIXER AND POWE


When the speaker is connected only at the power line does it makes this noise?
  • If it does it's an internal amplifier's ploblem and you have to check out some fittings (electrolytic capacitorsat the power supply, power supply transformer, voltage stabilizers e.t.c.)
  • If the speaker is quiet you have to check your external wiring because there is a loop ground. That means that one "ground level" line is connected at the ground by two or more cables (e.g. the audio ground and the grond from the mains power source) In this case disconnect the second (and the 3rd e.t.c.) grounding point.
In case of a problem or clarification, don't hesitate to post me a reply.
If you are satisfied, rate my solution with the "thumbs".

Thanks and regards
Please kindly rate this solution
Stelios
direct FixYa link: http://www.fixya.com/users/technical114

May 10, 2010 | JBL EON 15-G2 Powered DJ Speaker With EQ...

1 Answer

Making loud humming noise only.but if you plug


If I understand this correctly: with NO input or cable attached it hums; with an RCA cable attached it works. (What does 'some' mean in this regard?)

You say that connecting the RCA cable improves its sound. That tells me you're supplying a ground through the RCA cable for stray voltage in the sub.

It seems there may be a basic power issue if it hums with no input. Sometimes a given power source in a home may be wired differently than others or may insufficient grounding, which can result in hum. Try reversing the sub's power plug or move it somewhere else.

Since the sub contains its own electronics it is also susceptible to strong external magnetic fields. Keep it and any signal cables leading to it some distance away from other electrical devices like TV's.

Apr 08, 2010 | Velodyne CT-100 Speaker

1 Answer

I recently connected my satellite reciever to my


Iassume you mean you hear the buzz independently of the audio program - simply connecting the cable causes the buzz?

If tanything in the mix is powered from different AC sources you may have a different ground potential. Sometimes manipulating the orientation of one or more ac plugs will solve hum problems.

Apr 02, 2010 | M&K Sound Mp Series MX-350 MK II THX...

1 Answer

Subwoofer Emits a Buzzing Tone


The 2200 uF capacitor in the power supply has gone bad and the humming is a 60 Hz from the rectification of AC to 18 vDC.  Either get a new power supply or take apart the power supply and replace the bad cap.

Mar 16, 2009 | Altec Lansing AVS 500 Computer Speakers

1 Answer

Hum and Buzz Ground Loop


Best way is with balanced audio lines. Use either XLR or TRS cables IF your devices have those connections.

Also, do NOT use light dimmers as these are often a source of the higher frequencies that cause buzz.

Also power ALL the interconnected audio devices from a single source outlet rrather than from mulltiple building receptacles.

Dec 17, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Lexicon Lx-7 buzz sound


Hi chupetin2

If the problem is present with ONLY the speakers connected, that is no other powered devices like subs, or input/output cables, it will be a power supply problem inside the amp. If you have electronic fault finding skills, there will probably be a capacitor in a regulated rail that has failed.
If you do have a sub connected, be sure it is powered from the same mains source as the amp, or at least a GPO that is on the same phase. Different phases will induce mains hum, as will multiple earths. Try also temporarily moving the amp(whilst monitoring the hum) from where it is sitting and see if the hum is being induced into the amp by any other devices

Happy to talk to you more about this. Just ask:)

regards
robotek

Aug 18, 2008 | Lexicon LX-7 7-Channel Amplifier

Not finding what you are looking for?
LaCie External USB 2.0 500GB 7200 RPM 500 GB Hard Drive Logo

39 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top LaCie Computers & Internet Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

Raj Patel

Level 3 Expert

916 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2600 Answers

Are you a LaCie Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...