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Ihave a cicuit where their is a black and white feed of 120 volts. i have 120 volts to ground on black wire and 120 volts on white wire to ground, but i dont have 120 volts across the black and white

The black is suppose to be the feed and the white is suppose to be the neutral

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Your neutral is open.

Posted on Mar 23, 2014

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0 when i check it i only get 120 on both when i ground then in 0 when i check the white to black is this right the make is a ge 19.9 hot water heater


You did not post the make and model of the unit. However you should have three wires on a 120 volt heater. Black is HOT. White is neutral and green or bare copper is ground. Anything that you check with a meter connected to black should show 120. white connected to ground across the meter would show 0.

Mar 03, 2017 | Water Water Heaters

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

I have a new heater with diferant terminals from the old one so not sure how to atach the wires


There is no need to rewire the internal of the heater!
Just bring in the electrical supply to the heater, it can be either 120 or 240 volts.
If the heater you have is like the picture associated with your post, then all then have to do is change the supplied plug from 240 to 120. It comes pre set for 240. That plug is inside the cabinet.

If any other brand, then you need to change the wires at the transformer of the heater. All heaters need to be supplied with primary voltage: 120 or 240. Then the control system is supplied with secondary voltage out of the transformer. The secondary voltage is no more than 28 volts. and these wires are normally colored as blue or yellow.

Secondary power is already wired within the heater. NO need to change where they are. You will only need to deal with the Primary wiring.

There are many varieties of transformers that transform high primary voltage to a low secondary voltage of 28 volts. and these transformers have many wires: primary & secondary.
I will try to make this easy to understand.

If you have a Gas Heater Transformer with these colors:
  • Red
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or...
  • Red
  • White with Red Stripe
  • Black
  • White with Black Stripe
  • Green
These are Dual Voltage Transformers, you can bring in either 120 Volts or 240 Volts

If you bring in only 120 Volts...
1st example:
The Red wire will not be used! Hot wire to the Black, and the Neutral/Common, to the white wire. Green to ground.

2nd example:
Connect the Red wire with the White with Red Stripe together and connect these to the incoming Neutral/Common wire, normally White.
Connect the Black Wire with the White with Black Stripe to your incoming Hot Wire, which is normally Black.
Green to ground

If you bring in 240 Volts...
1st example.
1 Hot wire to the Red, the Other Hot wire to the Black, and White wire is not used. Green to ground

2nd Example:
Wire nut the two Striped wires together. then one incoming Hot wire to the Black, the other incoming Hot wire to Red.
Green to ground

Or This is only a Low voltage - 120 Volts Only
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or either any of these combinations...
  • 2 Blacks w/Green
  • 2 Reds w/Green
  • 1 Black, 1 Red w/green
This type will only be a high voltage, 240 volts only
Picture below is what a transformer looks like and it is where your incoming supply wires go. The smaller leads with the spade connections will go to a specific location & is the 'Secondary" .

Good Luck



25568369-di2jpn2pb5nzkrgf0hzbmyq5-3-0.jpg

Mar 14, 2015 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

T103 clock not working


Please read all of this post. You may burn up the 120 volt T103 timer motor is you are not careful.

The statement: "I have 120v board with 120 constant and 240 timed" is not very clear to me as to what you mean.

In US residential wiring, the white wire is not always the "neutral;" The white wire is sometimes used for 240 volt circuits.

We cannot tell you how to wire your timer unless we know _exactly_ what you have.

If your incoming supply cable (from the breaker box) has 3 wires (black, white, and bare), there are two scenarios:

1...If the voltage from black (hot) to white (ALSO hot in this case) is 240 volts, and you have only 3 wires (black, white, and bare), then the T103 is the _wrong_ timer if you are trying to control a 240 volt load. You should use a T104 timer.

The T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor and the T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor.

2...If the voltage between black and white is 120 volts, then you will only be able to control 120 volt loads; then the incoming black supply wire is connected to terminal 3 and the white (neutral) wire is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is then connected to the "GR" terminal.

To show the difference, if you are trying to control a 240 volt load, to use a T103 and wire it _correctly_, you would need to have a incoming supply cable with a total of 4 wires (black, red, white (neutral), and bare) Black to red would be 240 volts. Black to white would be 120 volts. Red to white would be 120 volts.
The connections would be as follows:
White (neutral in this case) to the "A" terminal
Black to terminal 1
Red to terminal 3
The 240 volt load would then connect to terminals 2 and 4
Both the bare equipment grounding wires are connected to the "GR" terminal.

Since you did not mention a red wire, I can only ASSUME that this is not the case.

Sorry, we can't tell you how to wire this timer based upon assumptions.

So, what do you have?


Dec 23, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

I have a maytag double oven cwe5100acb that has a black/white/red and a ground wire(s). Where it will be install the wires are black/white and ground. I cannot figure out what wire connects to what. Any...


black= 120 volts to ground
red =the other phase of 120 volts to ground
white=neutral
green/bare = ground
you seem to have a 120 volt wiring. you will need to change this wire to the panel from the existing, to # 6/3+ground you will need a 40 amp double pole breaker. THIS VOLTAGE/AMERAGE WILL KILL! If you are not an electician I would recomend hiring one, as, if done wrong the wiring can cause a fire or worse.

Aug 08, 2009 | Ovens

2 Answers

I am trying to connect my new pool motor. I have 3 wires coming out of the box. a black one 120v a white one 120v and a copper (ground). How do I test if it has 240v? How can I connect the motor so works....


Most probable cause is that you have the black and white on the same phase, and that's why you have 120 volts from black to ground and from white to ground, but 0 across black and white. If the motor ran on 120 volts, why are you connecting it to 240?

In any event, in order to get 240 volts, move the white to a circuit breaker that is directly above or below the breaker that feed the black wire. You are supposed to use a 2 pole breaker for 240 volts anyway

Jul 23, 2009 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

Just purchased new electric stove. The old stove had been hard wired. Black, white and copper. The new stove is asking to connect red, white and black. what should i do ?


Normaly black, white, copper (ground) is a 2-wire 110 volt, black white, red, copper is a 3-wire 220volt circuit. You must have a 3-wire cicuit run from circuit breaker box to stove connector.

Apr 28, 2009 | Kitchen Ranges

1 Answer

Cooktop WIring


To complying with changed Codes (effective in 2002 ) regarding stoves, ovens and dryers. You will need a 120/240 volt 4 wire 40 amp and 50 amp circuit. This
Decades ago it was permitted to use a 3 wire system (having two 120 volt hots (Black and Red) and 1 combination ground/neutral wire) (green and white) to serve stoves, cooktops, ovens and dryers.
The Code change now requires all stoves and dryers in NEW construction to have the 4 wire set-up (now having two 120 volt hots, 1 white neutral and one green or bare wire ground).
Existing wiring is grand-fathered under the Code change.....I advise you to change the feed wiring over to the the 4 wire set-up...
because - as with ALL Code changes in the past...it will eventually become mandatory for all stoves, ovens and dryers as the grand-father clause drops off. By complying now...
BUT the wiring will need to change to 8/3 with ground. (having 4 wires inside one outer jacket).This is the primary reason for the Code change....to provide a greater margin of safety to the user.
I can NOT recommend the 3 wire hook-up...the 4 wire provides a seperate ground and neutral -
which makes the chance of a user shock when touching the metal frame (from an internal fault in the oven) much less likely then the old 3 wire set-up....
which did NOT have the seperate ground and neutral.
Krazytech

Apr 05, 2008 | Whirlpool 30 in.GJC3055 Electric Cooktop

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