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All images are in negative format

Images on screen appar as though they are negetives like the old camera film negetives

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Why is film clear after developing? Using bulk load Tmaxx 400


Sounds like the camera isn't working. It would appear the shutter doesn't function because you have no images at all. I would open up the camera and check this. (Empty of film of course).

Feb 25, 2015 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

What size film is used in this model


It uses standard 35mm film, also known as size 135. You should be able to buy black-and-white, color negative (print), and color transparency (slide) film at any camera store. Many drugstores and supermarkets also carry film, though usually a smaller selection.

Jul 12, 2011 | Jazz 506 Point and Shoot Camera

1 Answer

How to see the picture after it has been taken for nikon f65?


The F65 is a film camera. You must get the film processed before you can see any pictures. If you have the setup yourself, you can develop the film. Otherwise, take the film to a photo processing lab (any camera store and many department stores, drugstores, and supermarkets either have them or have access to one) and get it processed. If you're shooting negative film, you can get prints. If you're shooting slide film, you can get slides. Either way, you can also request a CD containing the digitized images.

Again, the F65 is a film camera. The camera can't show you the images it has taken.

Nov 26, 2010 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Negative picture when filming


I found the home website for your camera on sony.com's european website:
http://support.sony-europe.com/dime/camcorders/sd/d8/d8.aspx?site=odw_en_GB&m=DCR-TRV140E

I didn't see anything about a negative picture on screen when filming, though.

Good luck on finding a solution to your problem.

Jul 18, 2010 | Sony Handycam DCR-TRV140E Digital...

1 Answer

My pictures and negatives have a white line going threw it .


It's scratch along the film and will have been caused by either faulty film (very unlikely but not impossible), or it has been scratched when running through the camera or processing machinery (sadly both very common).

Open the back of your camera and lay a section of scratched negative over the back, emulsion side down, just as it would have been when taking photos. Use the scratch to guide you to find any rough/sharp points especially across the masking frame (the 36mm x 24mm rectangular hole in the camera which determines the size of the image). If you find none, then take your negative along and ask ask at the photo lab you use whether they have had any problems. They'll almost certainly say "no" but will then quietly check and rectify their machinery if they find dirt or debris stuck in there. Frequently the fault is in their sleeving machine which cuts up the negatives into shorter lengths.

Unfortunately, it's a problem which is far more common these days. Most 35mm film cameras are old and poorly maintained, or are just overpriced and badly made plastic toy cameras like the entire Lomo range. In addition, many people get their films processed at local minilabs and as they're used less frequently now the standards of operation and maintenance have generally fallen. I find that if I use a postal processing service the large commercial labs have better maintained machinery. The downside is that the local minilab will often give a more personal service with respect to getting an accurately exposed print and the large commercial lab will not unless you pay for a premium service.

May 07, 2010 | Lomo graphy SuperSampler 35mm Film Camera

1 Answer

E is flashing all the time when on?? can not open camera to remove film. Camera is locked--battery is new.


The flashing E means that the film has no more exposures left. When this occurs the film is usually automatically rewound into the cassette and the loading door can then be opened.

In your case, the film has not fully rewound and so the door remains locked. A fresh battery usually cures it but has not done so in your case. You can try using a pointed object such as a pen or pencil to press the manual rewind button on top of the camera (below the "select" and "enter" buttons on the top plate) but if that fails then you will need to break open the camera in total darkness to remove and rewind the film.

Breaking the camera seems drastic, but if the camera is broken then it's effectively irreparable anyway. APS cameras were a very badly engineered system and there are very few which are still working these days as the film transport mechanism was simply awful. There were various other problems with them as well, so many don't work for other reasons.

After you recover your film you can either replace the camera with another one (APS film is an almost dead format though) or switch to a conventional 35mm film camera which has better image quality as well due to the larger negatives. Either way, there is absolutely no need to actually pay for one; there are millions of them sitting unused in people's drawers and cupboards and you can either wait for one to be offered on your local FreeCycle/Freegle groups or request one. Note that a rule of these groups is that your first posting MUST be to make an offer, but you're free to respond to offers for items offered by other members.

You might want to consult this online resource from Kodak regarding your camera for further information about it.

Please take a moment to rate my answer.

Mar 13, 2010 | Kodak Advantix C650 Zoom APS Point and...

1 Answer

Negative images


Check the settings and try to update the software/drivers if available from manufecturer's website. (ehteshamhusain@gmail.com)

Jul 19, 2009 | Epson Perfection 4180 Photo Flatbed...

1 Answer

By scanning my negetive film 35mm,allways cuts a horizontal part.


Try lower resolution while scanning & do set it at color settings. After preview then set color or monochrome......sodeep

Mar 19, 2009 | HP Scanjet 4370

1 Answer

Canon Rebel 35mm - Line down centre


This looks as if the negative has been scratched by the minilab processor. It could be scratched in tha camera but with this camera there are only two places this could happen resulting in this kind of scratch.

One is the film cassette itself, the other is the take-up spool, where the film is wound onto itself. However this would not be likley to create a scratch affecting more than one or two negs.

Colour film has a built in orange filter which compensates for the excess sensitivity of colour papers to blue. If this is scratched away, then more blue get's through which prints yellow.

The processing machine uses sqeegee's to prevent carry-over of chenicals form one bath to another, and damage or contaminaton of any one of these can scratch the negative. This is much more likely during processing, as the emulsion is softer when wet.

Films usually have a protective anti-scratch layer, but the protection is not 100%. Also develelped emulsion is generally harder than undeveloped as the last development stage often contains chemical hardeners designed to give extra protection to the negative.

The reason it may not show on all the prints is simply that these days many colour film is printed by digital scanning. Many scanners can detect scratches by viewing the negative in infrared light. Photographic dyes are transparent to infrared in order to reduce heat absorption from enlarger lamps, so there should be no image visible in infrared, anything that is must be dust or a scratch. The image can them be processed to compensate for the scrathes making them virtually undetectable.

A thin scratch may be filled in by using pixesl just either side of the scratch to fill the scratch in. With a wider scratch, if there is some residual image then the software can use that and nearby unscratched areas as a guide to make an acceptable guess as to what was supposed to be there. If the scratch is too wide and too deep it will just give up. A bodged attempt may end-up worse than the scratch. (Often a skilled touch up artist can make it dissapear, but machines on their own are not that smart yet.)

So the good news is that your camera is unlikely to be at fault.

If this shows on one film or a batch of films processed at the same time, take them back to the processor. (I have done this before and been paid a fair amount of compensation. If they printed them at the same time it should be obvious that the negs were scratched before you took them home.)

On the other hand if this is showing on films processed at the same place over a period of time then don't use them again.

If this is happening no matter where you get the film developed, then you might need to check you camera!

Jan 19, 2009 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Saving photo files


The building blocks of your image library are the actual file formats in which you save your images. There are two major formats: compressed and uncompressed. • The advantage of uncompressed storage is that you can save a maximum amount of image-forming information for color fidelity and clarity. • Compressed file formats get rid of some information to shrink the file size (thereby increasing a disk's storage capacity). We recommend saving all your work-in-progress images (equivalent to the negatives in film cameras) as TIFF files. This way they will remain at maximum quality, so you can create other versions for printing or e-mailing, and can save them in smaller, compressed files like JPEGs. The advantage is that you'll always be able to recreate an effect or enhancement by starting with the original TIFF file without losing image integrity.

Sep 08, 2005 | HP Photosmart 120 Digital Camera

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