Question about Ariston Technologies AWD 121

Open Question

My safety coil protection module is burned up. Where can I purchase a new one?

Where the cord is connected to the module just inside the unit, the coil has burned up. I would like to purchase a new one. The part number is 413180000

Posted by Anonymous on

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I have a hp officejet 7410 it keeps losing connection with wireless router, I need to do a hard reset to factory out of box condition, starting from scratch seems the only way to get it back on line,...


May be you can try to perform partial reset by :
  1. Disconnect the power cord from the back of the product, and then wait for 20 seconds.
  2. Press and hold # and 3 on the product control panel while connecting the power cord to the back of the product.
  3. Release the buttons when the product turns on. The reset is complete..

Step one: Reset the power module The power module has a safety feature inside that protects the product during a power surge. If you experienced a recent power surge, the power module might need to be reset. Use the following steps to reset the power module.
  1. Unplug the power supply from the rear of the product.
  2. Unplug the power cord from the electrical outlet, power strip, or surge protector.
  3. If the product uses a power module with a detachable power cord, disconnect the cord from the power module.
  4. Wait 15 seconds.
  5. Reconnect the power cord to the power module.
  6. Plug the power cord back into the electrical outlet. Do not use a power strip or surge protector.
  7. Check to see if the power module has an LED.
    • If the power module does not have an LED, continue to the next step.
    • If the power module has an LED, check to see if the LED lights up.
      • If the LED does not light up, contact HP to replace the power module. To buy a compatible power module, right-click the following link, How to Buy HP , and then click Open in New Window .
      • If the LED lights up, continue to the next step.
Step two: Test the power on the All-in-One Follow these steps to test the power on the product.
  1. Reconnect the power supply to the rear of the product.
  2. Press and quickly release the Power button to start a Power On/Off cycle. Do not hold the button down.

Dec 02, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Getting spark and fuel and did a tune up and put new injectors in there but the car cranks but wont start and it is 1988 corvette


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

Sep 25, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet Corvette

1 Answer

89 k1500 towed, now fuel injectors dont fire. read all wired to and from ecm, check good. ecm will start another truck.


Check the ECM fuse and then check for any loose wire connectors, especially at the fire-wall area, the ignition coil, and the distributor. Then check for battery voltage at the positive side of the ignition coil when the ignition key is in the "On" or "Run" position, and there should also be battery voltage running over from a wire that is also connected to the positive side of the ignition coil, and then that wire will run over from the ignition coil to the ignition module inside of the distributor, and if there is battery voltage there at the ignition module, then either the ignition module or the pick-up coil inside of the distributor will be the most likely suspects for the cause of the problem.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is actually what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like it could also be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.


1a01318.jpg

8d696cc.jpg

Sep 18, 2010 | 1989 Chevrolet K1500

1 Answer

1987 cutlass ciera TBI carb -fuel to carb but no fuel injecting into carb-jet module is good-What other problem


If there is fuel to the fuel injectors in the top of the throttle body TBI (Throttle Body Injection) but they do not function, then most likely there is no signal or pulse to the fuel injectors. Check the ECM and the Fuel Injection fuses first.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems or all of them to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Aug 13, 2010 | 1987 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme

1 Answer

1979 chevy van not getting spark.was running fine day before.turns over fine,getting fuel.could it be the module


First thing is what condition are the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires in?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil located in the top of the distributor cap is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Bat" or "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position. Then check the secondary resistance to the ignition coil.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


b0c4aa0.jpg

Jul 29, 2010 | 1979 Chevrolet C/K 3500

1 Answer

1991 Caprice Classic.Fuel pump works but does not activate when the car is started with the key. Also no spark. Any ideas?


The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one or all of these systems to malfunction.

There is also the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor and ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition coil to the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.


33e83d1.jpg

1a5de04.jpg

Jul 15, 2010 | Chevrolet Caprice Classic Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have an 88 Chevy Cheyenne 4.3 V6 with a throttle body. It is acting like gas is not getting into the jets. I checked the fuel filter, fuses, relays, wiring to the jets, and still can't find the...


If the fuel pump does run and there is fuel pressure but there is no fuel injector pulse to the fuel injectors at the top of the throttle body, then the problem is either with the distributor, the ECM, or the wiring between the ignition module inside of the distributor and the ECM.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

819ba82.jpg

c2762d7.jpg

Jul 13, 2010 | Chevrolet C1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Does not get any fire to sparkplugs replaced pickup coil router ditributer cap wires coil crank sencor and mocule by the coil and still no fire the truck started acting like it wanted to shutoff and it...


That sounds like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, I did not see that mentioned by you above, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick layer of the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 15, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Silverado 1500

1 Answer

If I open and close the printer it starts as if it is doing printer prepeartation, but nothing comes on. The screen will not turn on.


  • SOLUTION 1 If the HP All-in-One is turned off, press the On button to turn the unit on.
  • Unplug the power cord from the back of the HP All-in-One.
  • Wait 15 seconds.
  • Plug the power cord back into the HP All-in-One.
  • Turn on the HP All-in-One by pressing the On button.SOLUTION 2: Reset the power module and test the power Step one: Reset the power moduleThe power module has a safety feature inside that protects the product during a power surge. If you experienced a recent power surge, the power module might need to be reset. Use the following steps to reset the power module.
    1. Unplug the power supply from the rear of the product.
    2. Unplug the power cord from the electrical outlet, power strip, or surge protector.
    3. If the product uses a power module with a detachable power cord, disconnect the cord from the power module.
    4. Wait 15 seconds.
    5. Reconnect the power cord to the power module.
    6. Plug the power cord back into the electrical outlet. Do not use a power strip or surge protector.
    7. Check to see if the power module has an LED.
      • If the power module does not have an LED, continue to the next step.
      • If the power module has an LED, check to see if the LED lights up.
        • If the LED does not light up, contact HP to replace the power module. To buy a compatible power module, right-click the following link, How to Buy HP , and then click Open in New Window .
        • If the LED lights up, continue to the next step.
    Step two: Test the power on the All-in-OneFollow these steps to test the power on the product.
    1. Reconnect the power supply to the rear of the product.
    2. Press and quickly release the Power button (c01602202.gif ) to start a Power On/Off cycle. Do not hold the button down.

  • Apr 07, 2010 | HP Photosmart C6180 All-In-One InkJet...

    1 Answer

    Faulty safety power cord...


    You can by-pass it by simply connecting the 2 wires together. Obviously the safety it is supposed to protect you from will not work, but it can get you by instill a replacement can be found. It seems like the surge burnt the coil out on the switch. If you are conscious of the heater and what its going ,you should be safe. They made these things a long time without a trip switch on the cord. It just requires some common sense.

    Mar 10, 2008 | Haier hwr10xc6 Air Conditioner

    Not finding what you are looking for?
    Ariston Technologies AWD 121 Logo

    Related Topics:

    29 people viewed this question

    Ask a Question

    Usually answered in minutes!

    Top Ariston Technologies Washing Machines Experts

    Darren Moxam
    Darren Moxam

    Level 2 Expert

    67 Answers

    Gerry Harvey
    Gerry Harvey

    Level 3 Expert

    1461 Answers

    yadayada
    yadayada

    Level 3 Expert

    76070 Answers

    Are you an Ariston Technologies Washing Machine Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

    Answer questions

    Manuals & User Guides

    Loading...