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Putting an R in the decimal place

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Rounding decimals 3 places


You round a number with several decimal places to a number with fewer decimal places.
1.14 rounded to 1 decimal place 1.1
What you are asking for can be done by putting a zero after 4 and write 1.140, BUT that is not rounding. In fact you can put as many zeros after 4 as you want.

Feb 24, 2014 | Mathsoft Computers & Internet

1 Answer

HP12c seems to not have enough room for numbers BEFORE the decimal point. I try to enter the number "85" and all that will show up is the 8.000000000


Initial Setup

One adjustment is important before we get started. By default the 12C displays only two decimal places. This is not enough. Personally, I like to see five decimal places, but you may prefer some other number. To change the display, press "F" and then the number of decimal places you wish to display. I would press "F 5 " to display 5 decimal places. That's it, the calculator is ready to go.
You need to hold the "F" key.---------

    1. Press and release the gold PREFIX key (f).
    2. Press the number key for the desired number of decimal places (0 through 9).
------------ Click this link below and follow the procedure:--- http://howtobyme.blogspot.com/2011/07/hp-12c-calculator-help.html
----------- This should help.Thanks.Helpmech.

Jul 21, 2011 | HP 12c Calculator

1 Answer

Define algebra:decimal


Decimal is the base-10 notational system for representing real numbers. The expression of a number using the decimal system is called its decimal expansion, examples of which include 1, 13, 2028, 12.1, and 3.14159.

Each of the arabic numerals 0 to 9 is called a decimal digit, and the period placed to the right of the units place in a decimal number is called the decimal point (or, in the case that a comma is instead used for this purpose, the decimal comma).


The decimal is a way of managing numbers that has ten as a starting point, or base. It is sometimes called the base ten or denary numeral system. The word "decimal" is also used instead of the word "period" to point out the dot that is sometimes used separates the positions of the numbers in this system. Almost everyone uses this nowadays and prefers the convenience of it probably because it shows up most often in calculations in nature and has "one" as another starting point for the system. The number one is usually the easiest to work with in calculations.




You may go to the link below for decimal tutorial:


http://www.algebra1help.com/flash/noflash/3.html

Jun 16, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Explain "CUT", "UP", "5/4"


CUT: Values are cut off to the number of decimal places speicified by the current Decimal Place Selector setting

UP: Values are rounded up to the number of decimal places speicified by the current Decimal Place Selector setting

5/4: Values are rounded off (0,1,2,3,4 are cut off; 5,6,7,8,9 are rounded up) to the number of decimal places speicified by the current Decimal Place Selector setting

May 04, 2011 | Corporate Express CEB95005 Calculator

1 Answer

Convert .714285 to the fraction 5/7?


Say you have a repeating decimal number 0.714285 714285 714285 etc. You identify the period (the repeating part) and in this case it is 714285.
Y
ou count the number of decimal places in the period: here it is 6. Your equivalent fraction is
Fraction= period/(99...9) where the number of 9's in the denominator is equal to the number of decimal places in the period. For this case, that is 6.
Thus
0.714285 714285 714285 etc.= 714285 / 999999

Reduce the fraction and you will find 5/7

This technique works for a repeating decimal number where the period starts just after the decimal mark.

If the periodic part does not start right after the decimal mark there are modifications to be made.

Jan 16, 2011 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

I have this really big and werid problem with my sharp calculator. Its the scientific notation where i am solving this physics problem, but its just the part where im putting it into my calculator which is...


You need to update this calculator. You can do that by clicking here! The previous model Sharp used a 10 digit accuracy and, 2 digit limit for exponents. Us young guys would watch the instructor crunch his math with out putting the zeros in. And then when he gave the answer he would just simply add the zeros back in. If you don't see any improvement after you update, I just may recommend you to do the same. You do know the 5 decimal places isn't your only problem, Right! You have a correct answer problem too. Unless it is a typo.

Dec 25, 2010 | Sharp ELW535 Calculator

1 Answer

Convert 4 2/9 to a decimal


Step 1: Find a number you can multiply by the bottom of the fraction to make it 10, or 100, or 1000, or any 1 followed by 0s. Step 2: Multiply both top and bottom by that number. Step 3. Then write down just the top number, putting the decimal place in the correct spot (one space from the right for every zero in the bottom number) Example 1: Express 3/4 as a Decimal Step 1: We can mulitply 4 by 25 to become 100
Step 2: Multiply top and bottom by 25:
×25 left-up-over-arrow.gif 3 = 75

4 100 left-under-over-arrow.gif ×25 Step 3: Write down 75 with the decimal place 2 spaces from the right (because 100 has 2 zeros);
Answer = 0.75

Example 2: Express 3/16 as a Decimal Step 1: We have to mulitply 16 by 625 to become 10,000
Step 2: Multiply top and bottom by 625:
×625 left-up-over-arrow.gif 3 = 1,875

16 10,000 left-under-over-arrow.gif ×625 Step 3: Write down 1875 with the decimal place 4 spaces from the right (because 10,000 has 4 zeros);
Answer = 0.1875

Example 2: Express 1/3 as a Decimal Step 1: There is no way to multiply 3 to become 10 or 100 or any power of 10, but we can calculate an approximate decimal by choosing to multiply by, say, 333
Step 2: Multiply top and bottom by 333:
×333 left-up-over-arrow.gif 1 = 333

3 999 left-under-over-arrow.gif ×333 Step 3: Now, 999 is nearly 1,000, so let us write down 333 with the decimal place 3 spaces from the right (because 1,000 has 3 zeros):
Answer = 0.333 (accurate to only 3 decimal places !

Sep 22, 2009 | Black & Decker Juicers

1 Answer

I want to increase the number of decimal places


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I found this solution on the HP website. Turn it on, and do what it says. Then turn it off and back on again, and the extra decimal places should show.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?dlc=en&lc=en&cc=us&docname=bpia5183 Introduction This document describes how to set the desired number of decimal places on the HP 12C Calculator in standard format and in scientific notation. Instructions for standard format
  1. Press and release the gold PREFIX key (f).
  2. Press the number key for the desired number of decimal places (0 through 9).
The display will show the specified number of decimal places. The answer will be rounded to the number of digits selected.

Mar 25, 2009 | HP 12c Calculator

1 Answer

My calculator has a funny format


Try pushing and releasing [f], then [4]. This will give you 4 decimal places. (It follows that if you want 5 decimal places, push 5 instead of 4, etc). If that doesn't work, you can try taking the batteries out and putting them back in which should reset it to 2 decimal places, then set it where you want it following the above.

If it continues to malfunction I suggest taking the batteries out for 24 hours to allow a static discharge. This will lose anything you stored in the calculator, setting it back to how it came from the factory.

Nov 29, 2007 | HP 12c Calculator

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