Question about Science & Laboratory

Open Question

Issco microscope stage falling down

When i try and focus the stage will not remain in place - something needs tightening I guess - where and how to I do this?

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Dave Duff
  • 30 Answers

SOURCE: Microscopes

Well then ?

It sounds like you do have a pre-tension problem, and if the fine focus is slowly turning as the stage desends, that is where your problem is. If you could tell me make and model, fixing it should be no problem.

Regards.....Dave

Posted on Mar 10, 2008

  • 45 Answers

SOURCE: problem with MF-02 binocular microscope stage

I think your problem lies in the way the stage is limited upwards. On top of the stage, right behind it where it slides against the arm, there should be a little screw.  This screw limits the movement of the stage to a certain point upwards.  If the limit exceeds the adjustment gear and its opposing track, then the stage just goes up one notch and then it clunks down.  If you screw it down the stage is limited further down, if you screw it up it's limited a bit higher.  The point of this screw is to prevent objective and slide damage.  Try adjusting this little screw a bit further down and see if it still 'clunks' when you turn it up.  After that we may work on properly adjusting it.  If not, please post again with whatever detail you can provide to aid you with this problem further.

Posted on Jun 09, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Stage slowly falls causing unfocus

Try holding the Right knob so it does not move, whilst firmly moving the Left knob towards you (clockwise), this is the adjusting method used on Zeiss Jena 1960's High End microscopes, e.g Eduaval & Ergaval.
Good luck,
Alan Mowle

Posted on Mar 20, 2009

  • 36 Answers

SOURCE: stage slides down after focusing

There is a tension adjustment for this. It is located on the coarse focus knob which is on the same side as the switch. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. A strange looking tool should have come with the scope. It is designed to fit into these holes and allow you to adjust the tension on the coarse focus knob. You need to tighten it just a little bit. Not too much or you will have trouble operating the coarse focus knobs smoothly.

Posted on Dec 25, 2010

  • 15478 Answers

SOURCE: Inner part of focus knob spins freely, can't remove to service microscope!

YOu need a spanner wrench, they are a jewelry or photography technician item. Look on EBAY for them, they are cheap

Posted on Jul 27, 2012

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Why does the mechanical stage for my microscope keep falling to the bottom-most position?


Maybe there is some wear at the thread where the stage fits, causing that the stage cannot hold.

Mar 19, 2016 | Nikon Labophot trinocular Microscope...

1 Answer

The stage is not moving when the focussing Knobs are moved. The stage moves freely vertically. It's not attached, I'm sure it needs to be re aligned and a screw need tightening, but which screws?


Hi Faye , we will probably need more info

Does the stage move freely on its own without the course focus knobs

Can you move the stage up and down with either of the course focus knobs

Instrument details / picture would help .

Oct 07, 2015 | Science & Laboratory

1 Answer

After focusing it drifts out of focus. The knobs do not stay in the same place


There is a tension adjustment just inside the coarse focus knob. (same side as the switch) It looks like a chrome ring with 2 or 3 holes in it. You may have an odd looking tool that came with your microscope that is used to make this adjustment. Tighten it just a bit until the stage stops falling. You don't want it too tight or it will begin to make it difficult to adjust your coarse focus.

Dec 01, 2010 | National Optical 131 Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

The stage slides down on its own and the view gets out of focus.


Just inside the coarse focus knob you will see a "chrome" ring with holes it it. That ring needs to be tightened just a bit. It will make the coarse focus knob stiffer so tighten only enough to stop the downward drift of the stage. A funny looking tool should have come with the scope. It is used to adjust this "tension" ring.

Oct 22, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

The focus knobs drift


Just inside the coarse focus knob you will see a "chrome" ring with holes it it. That ring needs to be tightened just a bit. It will make the coarse focus knob stiffer so tighten only enough to stop the downward drift of the stage. A funny looking tool should have come with the scope. It is used to adjust this "tension" ring.

Oct 13, 2010 | National Optical 138-MS Monocular...

1 Answer

Stage slides down after focusing


There is a tension adjustment for this. It is located on the coarse focus knob which is on the same side as the switch. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. A strange looking tool should have come with the scope. It is designed to fit into these holes and allow you to adjust the tension on the coarse focus knob. You need to tighten it just a little bit. Not too much or you will have trouble operating the coarse focus knobs smoothly.

Jul 08, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

Swift microscope no 634008 having problem staying in focus when switching magnification


First, a scope of this grade will not be completely in focus as you move from one magnification to the next. But it should be close enough that you do not loose your point of interest.
Be sure you are not pressing down on the stage specimen platform as you change magnifications. It is very sensitive to pressure. Also, be sure that the coarse focus tension is tight enough that the platform is not drifting down imperceptibly as switch magnifications. Look through the scope and watch if the image goes out of focus while you are watching it. If so, you have what is called "stage drift". This is corrected by tightening the tension on the coarse focus knob.
The tension adjustment is on the coase focus shaft. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. There should have been a strange looking tool that came with your scope. It is used to adjust the tension. If your specimen is "drifting" out of focus, simply tighten the tension ring a little bit at a time until the specimen no longer goes out of focus. Do not get it so tight that it is not easy to operate the coarse focus knob.

May 22, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

2 Answers

I have a fisher stereo microscope on boom stand. When I rack up or down the body keeps falling as it is unable to keep its tension. What can I do?


You need to tighten the coarse adjustment screws to provide more tension so it sticks. Leave the fine adjustment as it is, it works on a different system. It's the coarse adjustment crank that is slipping due to the weight of the stage and lack of pressure from the screws.

Oct 07, 2009 | Fisher Science & Laboratory

2 Answers

Focuser broken


Not really a solution, but anything is better than a posting that get's NO response. It sounds like the rack and pinion drive has collapsed. If you're good with your hands and have a knack for things mechanical maybe you can dissassemble the stage mounting and see how it's meant to work. If something has come loose rather than broken maybe you can fix it. If teeth have stripped from the drive gear - you may be unable to effect a repair. I guess trying to fix it is better than doing nothing. Have a good 2008

kevin

Jan 05, 2008 | Meade 8200 Monocular Microscope

Not finding what you are looking for?
Science & Laboratory Logo

Related Topics:

48 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Science & Laboratory Experts

William McMath

Level 2 Expert

178 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Tom Chichester

Level 3 Expert

33359 Answers

Are you a Science and Laboratory Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...