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What is the sum of the first two multiples of 6?

If the answers to choose from are 3, 6, 12, 18, what is the sum of the first two multiples of six? I thought sum means, "add?"

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Sum means product, as you say an addition of two multiples. The multiples are 1, 2, 3 and 6.

Posted on Mar 19, 2014

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Find the sum of all integer multiples of 8 between 33 and 3051.


This sum is equal to 40+48+56+64+72+...+3024+3032+3040+3048= 40+(48+3048)+(56+3040)+(64+3032)+(72+3024)...
There are (3048-40)/8+1=377 terms in sum. (48+3048)=(56+3040)=(64+3032)=(72+3024)=3096 and there are (377-1)/2=188 pairs whose sum is 3096. Only term that is not in such pair is 40.
Finally sum is 40+188*3096=582088.

Jul 01, 2011 | Computers & Internet

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What is the answer of this problem? I am a four digit number. My ones is twice my tens. My hundreds is five less than my ones. My thousands place is the sum of my tens and hundreds. What number am i?


There are two possible answers to the above question, 4136 and 7348.
4136
My ones is twice my tens: The 6 (the ones) is twice as big as the 3 (the tens).
My hundreds is five less than my ones: 6 (the one) - 5 = 1
My thousands place is the sum of my tens and hundreds: 3 (the tens) + 1 (the hundreds) = 4

Jun 26, 2011 | Office Equipment & Supplies

1 Answer

Estimate the bond energy' S-F' in SF6.the standard enthalpy of formation of SF6(gas),S(g),F(g) are-1100kj/mole,275kj/mole,80kj/mole respectively


What is the S-F bond energy in SF6 given DHfo for each of the reaction components?

For this problem you must first calculate the change in enthalpy (heat transfer, delta H under standard conditions) for the conversion, S(g) + 6F(g) => SF6(g) OR for the reverse reaction, it really doesn't matter, because the numerical value will be the same, regardless. Once you calculate the heat transferred, you will be able to say that the amount of heat transferred was the amount of potential energy trapped in all of the S-F bonds, all six of them in the molecule. So, to obtain the answer asked for (the energy content on one S-F bond), all you will have to do is divide by 6.

The above is a logical approach, because all six of the S-F bonds are identical. This is so, because, according to VSEPR theory (look it up for more background on that, if you are interested), you can predict that its molecular geometry is "octahedral" with the central sulfur atom having "sp3d2 hybridization."

Here is how you set up the problem:

First write the balanced chemical equation with the given heats of formation (in kJ) written under each of the reaction components:
S(g) + 6F(g) => SF6(g)
275 6(80.) -1100.

Note: I am assuming that each of the above quanties is good (i.e., known) to at least the unit's place; that is, + or - 1 kJ. This reasonable assumption allows me to unambiguously indicate the number of sig figs in each quantity - an important consideration for proper rounding off of the final answer.

Recall that the sum of the product values minus the sum of the reactant values, each component multiplied by its corresponding coefficient will give the net enthalpy ("reaction enthalpy") of the reaction as written. In this case, there being only one product, the reaction enthalpy is:
-1100 - (480 + 275) = - 1855 kJ. From this, we can see that as S and six Fs are combined, 1,855 kJ of heat are released into the surroundings (that is, an exothermic reaction). The amount of heat released informs you of the combined bond energy of ALL six S-F bonds.

A good rule to remember: As bonds are formed, energy is always released (an exothermic process). As bonds are broken (as in the reverse reaction), the same amount of energy is being absorbed (an endothermic process).

Therefore, in conclusion, one S-F bond has a bond energy of 309.17, which is more properly rounded off to 309 kJ.

Recall that the rule for rounding off when adding or subtracting is to make sure that the final answer has the same precision as the values used to calculate it. Since each given value was good only only to the last unit

Nov 22, 2010 | MPS Multimedia QuickStudy Chemistry for PC

3 Answers

9999555533331111 out of these numbers any 6 numbers total is 21? how


this would be explained on the basis of two FACTS below.......
sum of two odd numbers are always even and
sum of to even numbers are also always even

then how 6 odd numbers (consider 3 pairs, 9 5 3 1 being odd numbers) can make an odd number 21..!!
SO SIMPLE
Make your basics strong...


Aug 14, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Program of matrix multiplication


In FORTRAN:

PROGRAM MATMULT
PARAMETER (N=3)
DIMENSION X(N,N), Y(N,N), Z(N,N)
DOUBLE PRECISION SUM
READ, X
READ, Y
DO 200 J=1, N
DO 100 K=1, N
SUM = 0.0
DO 50 L=1, N
SUM = SUM + X(J,L) * Y(L,K)
50 CONTINUE
Z(J,K) = SUM
100 CONTINUE
200 CONTINUE
WRITE, Z
END

Aug 04, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

There is a number that six times the sum of its digits. what is this number


I think the answer is 6. Because 6 has ONE digit, therefore multiply 1 x 6 = 6. n = 1 x 6

Jun 18, 2010 | Grilling

1 Answer

BASIC EXCEL FORMULA


Are you looking to solve any particular problem?--- because there are a huge number of possible formulas in Excel.

However, in my opinion, the most commonly needed ones are addition, subtraction, division, multiplication, and summing.

Suppose you have the following numbers typed into your Excel spreadsheet:

columns: A B C D
rows
1 20 3
2 10 4
3 15 2
4 1 2 3


Then suppose you type in the following formulas (in the D column):

columns: A B C D
rows
1 20 3 =A1+B1
2 10 4 =A2-B2
3 15 2 =A3*B2
4 1 2 3 =sum(A4:C4)


Then the following answers will appear in the D column:

columns: A B C D
rows
1 20 3 23
2 10 4 6
3 15 2 30
4 1 2 3 6

Sep 29, 2008 | Microsoft Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Number of rings before recording answers


Choose how many times the line will
RINGS IS...” ring before the system answers a call.
• Set for 2 to 7 rings, or choose
Toll Saver 2/4 or Toll Saver 4/6.
• When set to Toll Saver 2/4, the system
answers after four rings when you have
no new messages and after two rings
when you do. Toll Saver 4/6 causes the
system to answer after six rings when
you have no new messages and after
four rings when you do.
• During setup, the Message Window will
display the number of rings (8 for Toll
Saver 2/4, or 9 for Toll Saver 4/6).

Sep 05, 2008 | AT&T 1738 Digital Answering Machine

2 Answers

Formulas


You may want COUNTIF if you're specifying criteria. For instance, if my prices are found in b3 to b7, here's a formula that will find all those that are less than 6 ($6.00):

=COUNTIF(B3:B7, "<6")

If you're using multiple criteria, such as you want to find all the prices that are greater than $5 and less than $8, the following will accomplish it. (The ABS gives you the absolute value of the result, in case the smaller number is first.)

=ABS(SUM(COUNTIF(B3:B7, ">5") - COUNTIF(B3:B7, "<8")))

Nov 06, 2007 | Oracle 10g Database Standard (ODBSEONUPP0)

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