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What is the nitrogen cycle - Fish

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Https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm

this link has a good explanation

Posted on Jun 23, 2017

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Does nitrogen make a difference in tires?


Yes it does and it is important for aircraft tires and tires on higher end race cars but for the average motorist it is complete a waste of money.
It is a means for tire dealers and others to "upsell" customers to a very profitable product that they do not need and will be of very dubious benefit to them. Don't let them con you and here is why if you are interested in reading further.

1. You cannot get pure nitrogen in your car tires unless the tires are completely free of air to begin with and then filled in a vacuum. But they are not. They have air in them when they are filled. Further, unless you test the nitrogen going into your tires from the fill station you have no way of knowing if it is even 100% pure and often it will not be because of quality control issues..

2. Air is about 78% nitrogen in any event. Most of the rest is Oxygen and the remainder other gasses including Co2. Oxygen leaks out through the walls of the tires very slowly over time and what is left is a higher % of nitrogen. Then when you add air to your tires the oxygen in that air will slowly leak out and the cycle continues. So over time, just by adding air to your tires as they slowly lose some pressure, the % nitrogen content will increase as the oxygen will continue to very slowly leak through the fabric of the tire much faster than nitrogen which is very slow.

I saw one independent test which tested the pure nitrogen content of 2 tires, one that had a fresh nitrogen fill and another that had only used air over a couple of years. The tire which had only used air to fill it had a higher nitrogen content. Nitrogen fill = BIG FAIL in that case.

3. If you have paid for a nitrogen fill and you check your tire pressures and find they need topping up are you going to drive around to find a business with nitrogen available or are you going to just top up with air any how? Most people will just add air because they need it now and the gas station is open and convenient.

4. Aircraft and higher end race cars will use nitrogen rather than straight air primarily for one reason:
The pressures in the tires will not increase with heat and decrease when cold. They are stable.
Stable pressures are important for aircraft tires and for race tires(because the handling of the race car can be sensitive at high speeds to small changes in tire pressures. Funnily enough I never used nitrogen in my race car tires and nor did any of my competitors when I was racing. We just did not bother and set our tire pressures knowing how much they would quickly increase after a couple of laps).

But that is not an issue for passenger car tires. You fill them cold at or above the recommended pressure and, when you drive, the tires warm up from friction and the pressure increases by a few pounds which is not a negative issue. When the tires cool, the pressure drops slightly which again is not a problem because you always set your tires pressures cold. When you need to add air you can and you don't have to find a business that can do a nitrogen top up for you.

5. For 15 - 20 dollars you can buy a good tire gauge which you can use to check you tire pressures cold. When you need to add air you can and it is free. Normally I just over pressure the tires by a few pounds at the gas station and adjust them at home with my tire gauge when the tires are cold. It is simple and just check your pressures every 2 weeks or so at home at your leisure with your tire gauge.

Paying a bunch of money for a nitrogen fill and then having to pay again when you need to top them up is ridiculous for a road car. Using Nitrogen is no guarantee against slow leaks in your tires which can occur with a slightly faulty tire valve or a very tiny puncture or a leak under the tire beading where the tire wall contacts the wheel rim. So using Nitrogen does not alleviate the need to regularly check your tire pressures anyhow and to then adjust them when they drop below the recommended pressure or below your preferred higher tire pressure.

6. Finally the proponents of expensive nitrogen tire fills will tell you you need to use nitrogen or your wheels will corrode. They claim that the tiny amount of water vapour in air will cause condensation inside the tire and cause the inner surface of your wheels to corrode. This is complete nonsense. Your car will be dead long before your wheels will corrode from that. Any wheel corrosion that is possible from failure of the layers of paint protection is much more likely from the outside of the wheel which is totally unprotected from the elements, brake dust, scraping the wheels on kerbs and gutters, harsh wheel cleaners etc etc. I am yet to replace a car wheel due to corrosion, let alone corrosion on the inside of the wheel rim protected by the tire. Have you?

Dec 02, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

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Save money and get better gas milage and many more benifits!


Have your tires filled with nitrogen about 10.00 per tire. nitrogen is a dryer2_bing.gif, more stable gas that's less prone to changes in pressure due to heat or cold. Nitrogen has long been used in aircraft tires and in the tires of race cars Putting nitrogen in your tires will increase your fuel efficiency because properly inflated tires will reduce rolling resistance, which can mean as much as a 3 percent better mileage than a car with under-inflated tires. Nitrogen will not degrade the interior rubber of the tire or corrode the wheels, since it contains no oxygen or water vapor -- both present in the atmosphere we breathe and pump into our tires. When it comes down to a dollar decision, it's hard to argue that spending as much as $40 for nitrogen in a set of tires is a good fiscal move.Also it will cure a intermitten low pressure light

on Apr 18, 2010 | Ford Explorer Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

What is a biological aquarium filter?


A biological filter is a natural filtration system comprising of helpful bacterial colonies that through a cycling process transform pollutants, such as ammonia in water to harmless nitrate. This cycle process in commonly referred to as the "nitrogen cycle".

Aug 14, 2012 | Fish

1 Answer

How do I calculate this question with the fx-115es. Find the number of moles of nitrogen in 1.75 mol N2H4?


You have 1.75 moles of hydrazine or 1.75xNa molecules of the substance. Since each molecule of N2H4 contains 2 atoms of nitrogen 1.75Na molecules contain 2x1.75xNa atoms of nitrogen. The number of moles of nitrogen is 2x1.75xNa/Na, which leaves 2x1.75 or 3.5 moles.
Your answer: 1.75 mol of hydrazine contain 3.5 mol of nitrogen atoms.

Sep 23, 2010 | Casio FX-115ES Scientific Calculator

1 Answer

Yz125 rear shock amount of oil on


The volume is less than about 1/2 quart - it's usually not measured going in since you fill the shock completely - there's no need to measure. Some guys assemble the entire shock, then fill with oil and cycle the shaft, then install the bladder cap last. My method is to install the shaft and seal head and the bladder, then put about 2 PSI in the bladder, then bleed through the compression cap. My method is a bit more complicated to explain, but it's effective at eliminating ALL the air from the oil and it keeps the bladder from being installed in a collapsed state.

As far as the nitrogen charge - 145PSI is stock. 130-160PSI is typical.

Apr 30, 2010 | 2004 Yamaha YZ 125

2 Answers

Filling tires with Nitrogen!


You are not going to do any harm mixing. The only thing is, if you are going to fill with nitrogen, if you have to fill up with air in an emergency, get the nitrogen refilled at your earliest convienence. Why pay the money and waste it. It shows here you are inquiring with an SUV. I wouldn't bother. If you had a sports car of some sort that you wanted to increase handling charactoristics, I would say go for it. With an SUV just keep the tires rotated(every oil change is pretty convienant since it is already in the shop), double check your tire pressure every week or 2, keep the vehicle aligned every 6 months, and every 2nd oil change, have them check for proper wheel balance(it changes as tires wear).

Mar 28, 2010 | 2003 Toyota RAV4

1 Answer

What are the symptoms of a bad egr valve ina 1994 geo tracker?


this may help
EGR Theory. EGR serves one purpose and one purpose only. That purpose is to reduce Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx). Undernormal combustion, Nitrogen(N2)Oxygen (O2) in the air and Hydrocarbons (HC) in the fuel combind into water(H2O) Carbon dioxide (CO2) and the Nitrogen remains unchanged. Under very hot combustion temperatures, the Nitrogen reacts with the other two byproducts and forms Nitrogen oxide (NO). After being released into the atmosphere, it picks up another Oxygen and becomes Nitrogen dioxide (NO2). In the presence of sunlight,
it combines with other compounds like Hydrocarbons and forms Smog. Since exhaust gas is inert (very stable) it doesn’t burn again. So by being introduced into
the combustion chamber, it will lower combustion chamber temps enough so that
the Nitrogen doesn’t react with the other compounds and is passed unchanged out
the tailpipe thus not contributing to smog. Now, since exhaust gas doesn’t burn, it
doesn’t exactly help with combustion. At higher RPM’s, this really isn’t noticable,
but at idle, the reintroduction of exhaust gas will cause a very rough idle and can
cause stalling if to much is introduced into the combustion chamber

Feb 01, 2009 | 1996 Geo Tracker 2 Door

2 Answers

Losing tire pressure even with nitrogen in tires


Visit this website to get all you answers about Nitrogen in Tires.

http://www.getnitrogen.org/sub.php?view=getTheFacts

If the website doesn't answer your question

Get Nitrogen™ Institute
Denver, Colorado 80211
Phone: 800-406-6044
Fax: 303-845-5297

Send Them An E-Mail
info@getnitrogen.org

Dec 23, 2008 | 2008 GMC Acadia

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