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HOW TO USE AD820 OPAMP TO PRODUCE A SQUARE WAVE

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How does DC to AC attained in an inverter?


An oscillator is used. Typically a square wave ocsilaltor but a sine wave oscillator would be the ideal circuit design. Then this alternating current is put through a transformer to alter the voltage level through magnetic induction and the turn ratios between the primary and secondary coils to produce the required AC voltage.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_oscillator

Aug 19, 2015 | Electronics - Others

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I have a 1990 olds 98 regency. When u go around curves to the left it dies. Now it wont start at all. Its not the fuel,is it coil pack or in steering column


Please check for spark, injector pulse and test Crank position sensor.
1. Use a lab scope to check the square wave signals from the crankshaft sensor at the module pins G Dark Blue/White and H Light Blue/White.

2. Should produce roughly a 0-5 volt square wave. Voltage could be a little higher, depending on the brand of module.

3. If there is no signal on one of the wires, then check the wire for an open or short to ground.

4. Disconnect the crank sensor and check for power and ground to the sensor on the White/Black and Gray/Red wires.

5. Check the connections at the ignition module for being clean and tight.

6. Verify that the Pink wire at pin P is 12 volts key on and cranking. Verify the ground on pin K Black/White wire.

Mar 26, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Crank and cam censer


You need a scope or a graphing multi-meter to test these sensors. You need to be able to see the wave form pattern to determine if they are working properly. 2 wire sensors are AC signal generators and you should not be testing these unless you know what you are doing as they generate AC current. You can ohm test 2 wire sensors when they are disconnected. Not a reliable way make a positive diagnosis unless they are out of range. In range sensors can still be bad. 3 wire sensors are hall effect type sensors and produce a square wave form. They are not dangerous to test you just need the right equipment and knowledge.

Dec 19, 2013 | 1991 BMW 5 Series

1 Answer

1999 mazda millennia wont start showed p1345 code is there a way of testing the camshaft position sensor


you can test the cam shaft sensor ,but you will need a lab scope.
depending on what type of sensor if its a 2 wire sensor it will produce a a/c signal, if it a 3 wire sensor it will produce a square wave signal. but with out a lab scope. it just a guess

Sep 22, 2013 | 2001 Mazda Millenia

1 Answer

My dad took my car into autoZone and the receipt says "OEM Number to Cross: P1140" What is a P1140?


Nissan DTC P1140 - Intake Valve Timing Control Position Sensor (Bank 1)

Check the passenger side Intake Valve Timing Control Position (IVTCP) sensor for 12 volts on the Black/White wire. Check the IVTCP sensor for a good ground on the Black wire.

It should produce a square wave signal of around 8 volts. Check the pattern of the right side sensor and if unsure of the pattern, compare it to the left bank sensor.

Potential Causes: IVTCP Sensor
Wiring - IVTCP sensor wiring/connection.

Hope helps.

Apr 02, 2011 | Nissan Sentra Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Black max 7kw generator high voltage output


Those voltage readings MAY be normal.

The AC waveform may cause your meter to read inaccurately. You would need to use a TRUE RMS meter to accurately read the voltage.

The siple meters actually read the AVERAGE voltage and then are calibrated to mulltiply it by the "form factor" for a sine wave. OFTEN these generators don't produce a clean sine wave. A square-ish wave will read higher on the garden variety meters.

Compare the brightness of a lamp comparing to when run on your utility.

The frequency depends on engine speed ... yours is running a bit fast...check it under at least half load and if off, adjust the govenor slightly.

May 01, 2010 | Briggs & Stratton Power Products 5,550...

1 Answer

1999 jeep cherokee does not start, tried cp sensor still no spark , batt. voltage at coil on one pin during cranking, coil checks ok with ohm meter.pulled up fault codes and there were none.


should have voltage on both posts of the coil. when the computer momentarly grounds the coil (in response to the crank position sensor sending it a square wave single). it will force a good coil to produce a spark. i would look at the coil again
good luck chris

Mar 22, 2009 | 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Square Wave Question


Square Wave refers to the shape of the voltage cycle in a welding arc. In an AC wave, a typical sinusoidal or sine wave, changes the voltage from positive to negative gradually, although many times a second. This means the voltage will not be consistent and at times will actually go through zero. Square Wave, on the other hand, changes the voltage from positive to negative almost instantly, making for a much smoother and more stable welding arc. This is particularly important when welding aluminum and when considering aspects like cleaning and penetrating action.

Aug 27, 2008 | Campbell Hausfeld MIG / Flux Core Wire...

2 Answers

Bose AWR1-1W soundless


get bose to make a warranty replacement or repair, its not a user servicable part, infcat its going to be difficult to find the exact problem even if you REALLY want to open it up, it may also be a faulty opamp on IC not switching.

Sep 04, 2006 | Bose Wave Radio

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