Question about Celestron AstroMaster 114 AZ (50 x 114mm) Telescope

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Which lens is more powerful..a 10mm or a 20mm?

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A 10 mm. If you know the focal length of your scope, divide that by the focal length of the eyepiece, and the answer is the magnification you will get. However bear in mind when viewing astro objects, a very high magnification will degrade the image sharpness, and make the object hard to get on centre. Most experienced amateur astronomers use a medium power eyepiece at most.

Posted on Apr 10, 2014

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Where can i buy a replacement 10mm lens for celestron 31035 astromaster 76EQ telescope


There are various qualities of 10 mm, some fearsomely expensive. In the USA try here

http://www.optcorp.com/manufacturer/orion?cat=14

May 28, 2014 | Celestron 31035-astromaster 76eq - Kit

1 Answer

A lens is missing


This telescope uses 1.25 inch eyepieces. Comes originally with a 20mm and a 4mm (probably cheap modified acromats) The 4mm would exceed the maximum practical magnification. 50x per inch. Many eyepieces available on Ebay and telescope vendors. If the 20mm is missing, buy a 20mm Plossl. I prefer other designs focal lengths under 12.5mm because of the eye relief. Agenaastro makes great, inexpensive ($55). I like the Sterling Plossls from Smartastronomy too Eyepieces for planetary viewing I suggest the 5.2mm for your high power or a TMB planetary (Astronomics has them for $50 Get the 5 or 6mm

Clear Skies!

Oct 04, 2012 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

What foclelength of lenses are required to construct a telescope


Eyepieces determine the magnification of the scope-- first determine the focal length of the scope. It should be in the manual or written somewhere on the scope -- let's assume it is 1000mm.

So a 10mm eyepiece will give you 100 power

1000 divided by 10

a 20mm eyepiece will give you 50 power magnification

1000 divided by 20


www.telescopeman.org

Sep 23, 2011 | Meade Polaris 285 (225 x 60mm) Telescope

1 Answer

I have a zennox 700x76 with diemeter coated lens lenses h10 and h20 were do i get a lens to see things closer


The maximum magnification of any telescope is about 50 times aperture-- your scope is about 2.5 inches in diameter-- so 50 times 2.5 is about 125 power for your scope. Usually you only get 30-40 times aperture and 50 is only possible on perfect sky conditions.

You already have the 2 best eyepieces for that scope which are a 10mm and a 20mm. If you bought a 5mm you would only be able to use it a very few nights during the year (perfect sky nights) and it is more difficult to focus.

This company along with many others sell eyepieces--

http://www.agenaastro.com/



www.telescopeman.org
www.telescopeman.us
www.telescopeman.info

Jul 29, 2011 | Optics

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No they did not give me the right stuff they gave me 20mm but it was supposed to be a 60mm


Why would you need a 60mm eyepiece? I doubt these can even be purchased since I have never seen anything over 50mm -- this is a VERY low power eyepiece! The bigger the number the lower the magnification.

The normal ones would be 20mm-25mm and a 10mm-12mm.

This company sells eyepieces-- they come in 3 sizes, .965, 1.25, and 2 inch. Measure the hole in the focuser and buy the correct size:

http://www.agenaastro.com/

Apr 03, 2011 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

2 Answers

Iam finding my sigma 10-20mm lens is not focusing on automatic,can you advise,it is switched to auto,on a canon 400D,with polarising filter fitted!


Hi Dose the lens work in manual focus if so it may need a new motor if you are in the uk I can repair it for you for £45.00

Nov 03, 2009 | Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM for Canon...

1 Answer

I dont know how to use my barlow lens


I use a barlow lens quite a bit with my telescope. It is usually inserted before the diagonal if you use one or before the eyepiece if you don't. The barlow lens for your telescope will double the power of the eyepiece used.

However, despite what the manufacturer claims for your telescope things will look quite poorly if you try to view at 180 power. Generally you'll get the best images by using 50x for each inch of your objective lens. For example, your telescope has a 50mm lens. That's roughly 2 inches. 2 inches times 50x gives you a maximum useful power of 100x. Depending on the viewing conditions you may be able to exceed this or not even reach it. Things will look blurry and dim when you try to use too much power.

Your power or magnification is calculated by dividing your telescope focal length which is 360 mm by the eyepiece focal length. You have two eyepieces with focal lengths of 4mm and 20mm. If we divide 360mm by 20mm we get 18 power. If you add a barlow to that you get 36 power. Dividing 360mm by 4mm (no barlow) we get 90 power. That would be your maximum useful power.

Therefore, you should be able to used the 20mm eyepiece with or without the barlow but the 4mm should only be used without the barlow.

I hope all of the math wasn't confusing.

-jodair

Feb 12, 2009 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

3 Answers

Bushnell 18-1560 Telescope


Hello,
What you have is called a refractor-type telescope with the primary lenses (the Objective) at the top of the tube and the only other lenses in the system are your selection of eyepieces, probably a barlow lens (2X magnification of any eyepiece used), and a diagonal (in line mirror so that you cand see into the telescope from the side.). As the focal lenth of the eyepiece decreases, so does the distance away from the Objective Lens. I believe that you are using the telescope with a diagonal mirror which makes the optical path longer. The fact that your longer focal lenght eyepiece can focus and not your short one would be only if you didn't have the diagonal or the eyepiece all the way in tight to allow the focus mechanism (rack and pinioin) to get compressed enough to focus. Look at the Moon, if the image gets smaller then bigger as you focus, but not sharp, then I would have to tell you that your eyepeice lenses are not in the right order. Someoner may have taken it apart and didn.t put them back in the correct order. The lenese could just be very dirty also. Barrow a short focal lenght eyepice from a friend and see if it works in your system. Then you will know for sure.

May 15, 2007 | Bushnell Deep Space 18-1560 (150 x 53mm)...

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