Question about Tasco Golden Antler 3 - (9 x 40 mm) (3-9x40 mm)

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10-40x50 TG 1040x 50DS

I have lost an allen nut that holds my adjustments for MOA on my scope. Where can I find these?

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The manual is here under "Generic Riflescopes". It is a .pdf file.
http://www.tasco.com/support.cfm

The Tasco site for Riflescopes
http://www.tasco.com/section.cfm?s=Riflescopes

Any gunsmith shop should carry the allen nut.

Posted on Jul 19, 2008

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A 20 MOA scope base may be if assistance. The built in 20 MOA of elevation will allow you additional adjustment.

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yes actually there is two versions of this scope one with .25 moa adjustment and one with .1 mil adjustment.

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Can you explain to me about moas? i got this new p4 and im trying to learn how to use it can you tell me? and do i have to site it in at 100 yards first?


If you are going to attempt to sight in your rifle scope for hunting or just shooting, you will need a basic understanding of what a Minute of Angle is.

Think of a circle as it is divided into 360 degrees.

Each degree is divided into 60 minutes.

Each minute is divided into 60 seconds, but we don't use that for ballistics, seconds of angle are just used in machine shops and in rocket science.

Minute of Angle

1 MOA = 1/60th of a degree

1 MOA = 1.047 inches at 100 yards
Most accurate long range scopes are set in quarter clicks (4 clicks = 1 MOA) or eighth clicks (8 clicks = 1 MOA) but less accurate short range scopes are sometimes set in half MOA clicks (2 clicks = 1 MOA)? which to me is the opposite as it should be.


For a .308 the difference between shooting at 100 yards and at 500 yards is about 11 MOA. That adjustment with a scope using eighth clicks is 88 clicks.


Most accuracy testing is done at 100 yards, because it makes the math easier, and it is close enough to see the bullet holes through a spotting scope.

Folks usually say that 1 MOA is equal to 1 inch at 100 yards, which is almost exactly correct, as 1 MOA is only slightly more than 1 inch at 100 yards. But for what we are doing it is close enough. Now think it on out to 300 yards, 1 MOA is then equal to 3 inches. So if your shots are 1 inch off to the left at 100 yards; out at 300 yards, you will be off to the left 4 inches. Clear as mud? Hope this helps.

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We need 2 know what 4 m o a means


MOA is the abbreviation for Minute of Angle, which measures 1/60 of 1 degree. If you want all the technical jargon and math that involves, this link explains it all: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minute_of_angle

But when you're talking about rifle scopes, here's what you need to know:
Adjusting the angle of your scope by 1 MOA will change the point of impact by about 1 inch at a distance of 100 yards. So 4 MOA is roughly 4 inches over on an object viewed at 100 yards.

Usually, the windage and elevation adjustments on a scope will be about 1/4 MOA, or about a 0.25 inch change over 100 yards.

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This is my first Leupold scope, I don't understand the friction adjustments 1/2 MOA dials, I need to adjust 3 inches up and 1and 1/2 to the right, I have moved the dials in the direction indicated to no...


minute of angle is not the same as 1/4" per click at 100 yards. if it doesn't click something is wrong. i would call leupold and probably try to get a replacement from where you bought it. moa is an angle value not an inch value.

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What is the adjustment increment moa on a 3 x 9


1 moa = 1 inch at 100yards. I think your scope cliks at 1/4 moa.

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I have a Bushnell Sprotiew 4x, 15mm scope mounted on a Mossburg .22 rifle. My shots are hitting left six inches and low. Can you please tell me how to adjust this scope? Thank you.


Keep in mind Diane this is for a set distance. if you are taking a shot at a target further than your are set for (ie a target you wont get 3 shots @) remember how the bullet is travelling as it goes down range

one idea would be to set your rifle up down range and zero it in on a target (preferably paper) now adjust 1 MOA (try and have target @ 100 yards and 200 yards)

see how far the bullet moves for each moa adjustment. then check it against the next range.

this should remain constant @ a set number of inches per 100 yards.

so if you zero in @ 100 yards and then move 1 moa any direction and it adjusts (lets say and hope it is 1.047 inches") then you do the same for 200 yards. it should be twice as much movement. ie 2.094"

once you know what 1 moa represents on your scope you can adjust alot more accurately.

REMEBER the total inches of movement / adjustment per MOA is directly related to range (a precise range helps in shooting) so if your squirrel is 150 yards and your first shot is off 9" to adjust you divide 9" by the inches per moa so 1.5 (150 yards /100) X (Inches per 100 yards per moa you measured hopefully 1.047") its 9" divided by 2x1.047 = 9" / 2.094 = 4.29799

this number needs to be rounded to the nearest click on your scope (most are 1/4 MOA scopes and you can tell by looking at how many clicks/lines are inbewteen each large number on your windage and elevation dials

so to turn this into an adjustment we round 4.29799 to 4.25 which is 4.25 MOA or 17 clicks on a 1/4 min scope.

GL and any questions just post and ill help

not please rate this as fixya :)

Note i can provide EXACT information that would allow you to determine range, and windage and elevation adjustments by looking through scope and estimating range
then factoring in weather variables. NOTE you hafta enjoy math or just want to know how to shoot really well. :)


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Lost manual for trophy scope 3-9x40 rifle


There is no manual for elevation and windage adjustments. (at least not one that comes with your scope; all your scopes manual will say is whether its FFP or SFP (First Focal Plane or Second Focal Plane, the scale used on your scope for mil dots)(you can get this info by finding a store that sells this scope and asking a sales rep)

To adjust for elevation and windage you have to take into account the daily factors (unless your shooting in the same indoor environmental controlled shooting range each day you SNOB! jk

The formula takes alot of variables into account and is known as Exterior Ballistics

!) Environmental Factors - First thing you account for.

A) Elevation from sea level plays a large part into your environmental adjustments. Your elevation from sea level determines largely the Barometirc Pressure but it also varies slightly with Temp and Humidity (Major Factor)

B) Temperature - The temperature can affect the density of the air. The hotter it is the thinner it is and therefore less resistance and a higher bullet trajectory (Minor Factor)

C) Humidity - This again will affect the densify of the air infront of your bullet (Minor Factor)

D) Barometric Pressure - The other large factor in air density this is the base stat that the others modify

These all combined create a ratio that you apply to standard MOA (windage and elevation adjustments) to obtain the shooting information for that particular environment)



2) Bullet Factors (Listed on the Box you buy) - There are a few bullet factors to take into account.

A) Speed - the bullets feet per second can vary as much or more than 500 feet per second with the
same caliber ammunition.
B) Grain - The Grain of an ammunition is a measure fo its "Sectional Density" or weight to volume
ratio
C) Ballistic Co Efficient - This number is the measure of the bullets ability to maintain its speed
during flight. This also varies from Grain to Grain


These factors are complex and a pain for the best of shooters to determine. adding to that confusion. there are many ways to determine a bullets ballistics coefficient and each one gets a different number. In this case bullet data is best retieved from the manufactuerers box and take their word for it.

3) Lastly you account for shot factors.

A) Range - by referencing your standard elevation MOA adjustments and mutliplying by the ratio for environment the Elevation MOA is achieved.


B) Windage - Windage is done in inches per mile per hour then is multiplied by the Mph of the wind.
In order to be precise the windage is done in inches instead of MOA. it needs to be converted heres and example.

You Ballistics Cheat Sheet for the day says the windage at 900 yards is 5.2 Inches per mph of wind.
you apply the ratio for your environment .90 (all example numbers. this number would represent a shooting environment with an air density lower than standard/ the cheat sheet's known MOA adjustments). the 5.2 inches is multiplied by .9to acheive 4.68?? idk the point is you mulitply that by the wind of 10 mph to achieve a total of 46.8" of wind drift to the target.

now for the conversion to MOA. 1 MOA is eqaul to 1.047" per 100 yards. meaning for every 1 moa you adjust the bullet will move 1.047" per 100 yards (our target is 900 yards; meaning that each MOA for this target is 9*1.047" = 9.423" per MOA adjustment. so take that number and divide our total wind drift by it. ie 46.8 / 9.423 = MOA Windage Change of 4.9665... now you need to know whethere your scope is 1/4 minute clicks or 1/8 minutes (how many spaces between large numbers?) you would adjust to 5 MOA for a 1/4 minutes scope equaling 20 clicks on an 1/8th minute scope it would be 40 clicks.

This is the math of shooting. to learn how go to
WWW.shooterready.com they are an excellent sight to get the math down WITHOUT wasting ammo. Once you have the math you an transfer it to your gun. waste a few rounds checking it out and youll be hitting targets @ 1800 yards in no time

I like to take the simple way after i learned how to do the hard way

There is software tha will do the exterior calcualtions for you.

if your interested i use Sierra Infinity V6 Ballistics Software

GL


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1 Answer

Buy riflescope!!!! Which one????


Robert, I have the Simmons 6-21x44 MilDot # 511056 scope on my Savage model 10FCP Law Enforcement issue rifle. I think you should check it out. It has 90 MOA internal adjustment and you could get you something like a 15 MOA or 20 MOA tactical rail and push your adjustments out to 1000 meters!!!

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Sniper scopes


A scope is a personal preference really but there are some ground rules that do need to be followed.

any scope will be effective in a good shooters hands. however there are some bells and whistles that are nice to have.

1) For long distance shooting a scope with 40 MOA is preferable this allows for 10 MOA down and 30 MOA up giving the rifle the ability to zero for any range.

2) Hold over graphs are a beauty when your in a rapid target environment. here is an example
http://www.zeiss.com/C12568CF00206298/GraphikTitelIntern/rz1000_lg/$File/rz1000_lg.gif

this is more of a hunting scope but this hold over calibration allows for rapid fire.



Check this site out it will help you determine what you need

http://www.boomershoot.org/general/ChoosingOptics.htm

if you have any other questions or more specific questions post a comment and ill get back ta ya.

GL bud

Aug 20, 2008 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9003 (525 x 76mm)...

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