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Does the ceramic element in the heater lose its heating ability after a year or two

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Ge microwave ceramic element


The service manual is here.

You can find helpful exploded view diagrams and order parts by entering your full model number from the tag on the oven here.

You can download GE owner's manuals and installation instructions here.

Dec 27, 2013 | GE Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

Why does my Big Buddy Mr. Heater make a whistling or humming noise?


mr heater makes a whistling sound as gas escapes around the gasket of the ceramic heating elements, that is ,all around the outside edges of the ceramic heating elements.

You can find out exactly where the gas leak is , by pressing down on the outside edges of the ceramic elements with a big, long
slotted (flat bladed) screwdriver while mr heater is running and hot.

The screwdriver needs to be long enough so that you dont burn your hands [the longer & bigger the screwdriver, the better] & it does not hurt to wear heavy gloves too, because it gets very hot, very fast in front of mr heater.
The thicker the blade of the screwdriver is, the less chance of damaging the ceramic heating element because a thick bladed screwdriver will not concentrate all the pressure in just 1 tiny point.

You are not trying to crack the ceramic with a wood chisel.

Dont press down so hard that you break the ceramic heating element, start by pressing down gently and gradually increasing pressure until you notice a change in the whistle or sparks comming out of the heating element as loose carbon deposits
come out of the heating element and burn in the propaine flame.

When you press down on one edge ,the other opposite edge may come up slightly, resulting in loose carbon deposits escaping and burning as sparks.

also, you may not be pressing at the spot where the gas whistling is comming from and will need to move the screwdriver flat blade around the edges, here & there, to test for the effect of pressing down.

When you press down on the outside edge where the diamonds stop, while mr heater is whisteling, the whisteling will stop & mr heater will run quite. Sometimes, just pushing down with the screwdriver will stop the whisteling ,for a while,and maybe a good long while.

The big pain in the **** solution is to put a new gasket around the
ceramic heating elements, but there is no guarantee that the new gasket will not whistle.
Its a big ,nasty job, which I would rather not do--so I just push down with the screwdriver, to temporarly stop the whisteling, I guess it depends on how much the whisteling annoys you, as to if you want to go thru all the effort & expense of changing out the gaskets, without knowing if it will still whistle when you are done.

Im just a diy guy that has 3 big buddys I keep going for 4 yrs now.
I took one apart to look 4 the cause of the gas whistling, and then put it back together. Funny,it stopped whisteling & that was 3 yrs ago. I didnt put in any new parts.

It may help ,a lot ,to increase the pressure with which the Mr heater ceramic is pressed down against the gasket material.


This is accomplished by a heavy stainless steel wire that runs behind the ceramic heater element and goes through sheet metal
tabs on each side of the ceramic mounting frame.
You can bend the wire and the tabs,but only a little bit, and be very careful not to break the tabs because the tabs are not repairable, to increase the downwards pressure of the ceramic element against the gasket material. This may stop the gas whisteling--
its a try & see thing, a finicky adjustment, that sometimes works
& sometimes does not and sometimes, after a week or two, the ceramic might reseat itself against the gasket material and the whistling stop. Mine did stop whistling, but not until a couple of months after i did the job, due ,i think to reseating of the cermic against the gasket material. its try & see thing.


also ,a gas tank that has higher than average gas pressure may start gas whistling up but the whistling will stop after you have burned up the higher pressure of the propaine.

Jan 06, 2013 | Mr. Heater Big Buddy Heater

1 Answer

Heater bionaire bch9224-cn no heat


The Bionaire BCH9224-CN is a ceramic space heater, one of apparently 4 related units. The 9224 is the tallest in the family and I also have the shorter BCH9212-CN. They are electric so I have no idea what all this talk about 'gas', 'pilot light' and 'flame' is. My 9224 failed in a way that seems quite common with Bionaire space heaters in general, namely, first the smell of burning electrical insulation, then a snap or pop accompanied by a flash of light out the lower side, and then no more heat. It is possible that the original questioner had this happen but wasn't around to witness it. Now it is possible that the failure is in the electrical control board but in my case (and in fact I'm betting for many or most of the Bionaire failures) it was a wire running to the ceramic heating block (element) that fried at the connection to the ceramic element. I would say it is very unlikely the failures of the Bionaires are in the ceramic heater blocks themselves, and in fact the 9224 and the 9212 (and I assume many or most of the other Bionaires) actually have two ceramic blocks/elements fastened together, one being used for the 750 watt heating and both for the 1500 watt heating. The central wire running to the blocks must support enough current (about 12.5 amps) for both of the blocks, whereas the wires to the individual blocks need half that (about 6.25 amps). In my 9224 unit the weak spot was clearly where the central, common wire was connected to the spade-like connector that was crimped onto the central, common tab of the ceramic block pair. At first I thought I'd just toss the thing but then I opened it up, did the autopsy and repaired it by replacing the 3 wires from the circuit board to the ceramic blocks with 14 gauge wire, and made the connection of the wires to the three soft metal (tin or tin alloy?) tabs of the ceramic blocks by carefully drilling holes in the tabs and bolting eye, crimp-type wire connectors to the tabs using small screws. Oddly enough I opened up the smaller unit (the BCH9212-CN) and it has the same ceramic element pair but no indication of burnt wires.

Jan 08, 2012 | Bionaire Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Bionaire BCH9212 does not produce heat


These Bionaires (including your 9212 and its taller version, the 9224) have a small temperature safety relay mounted slightly above the ceramic heating elements. Its purpose it to shut off the elements if they overheat, which I would assume would happen if the fan stops working or possibly if the outlet to the front becomes blocked (and these ceramic elements, which are like a radiator core, do get a lot of dust accumulated on the inside which will block air flow). The sensor is a small unit with exposed contacts and if these contacts open (driven by the temperature sensor connected to them) or if these contacts do not have good contact (say by dirt or oxidation build up that makes them effectively fully or partially open) then the ceramic elements will not work. My best suggestion to explain your problem is that the contacts on that safety switch became dirty during storage. The only way to verify that (and possibly repair the unit) requires taking the outside shell off and cleaning the contacts of the safety switch with either a small, fine file (like the old ignition files) or maybe fine emery cloth.

Nov 30, 2011 | Bionaire Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Wires to heating element keep burning off


One of the creramic insulators that hold the heater elements may have broken allowing the element to ground out to the metal casing creating a short.
Also a loose wire or crimped connection where the heater element connects will create overheating and eventually a shortout.
If a ceramic insulator is broken, its probably best to purchace a replacement element wich may be available thru appliance parts online.
a loose factory connection can be replaced with a screw type wire connector be sure it will withstand the heat and amperage.

Aug 27, 2011 | Maytag Dryers

1 Answer

How to clean the intake filter


I clean mine like this, unplug the fan and head outside, I use compressed air and a blow gun. I blow the air thru the intake and then backwards thru the front heating elements and repeat until you have clean air in both directions. I average about five times both directions and I am good for the year. I have made a practice of cleaning it out in the fall of each year.

Dec 26, 2010 | Lasko 5132 Ceramic Compact Heater

1 Answer

It makes a lot of noise and its dirty inside. I just wanted to know the best way to clean it


use a compressor and a blow gun attachment blow the air thru the fan opening then back thru the heating elements do this several times back and fort until you get no more dust from the heating elements. I have done this on my own heater and it works just fine. Try this and you will find yourself cleaning the heaters each year this way with out taking them apart.

Dec 13, 2010 | Lasko 5367 Ceramic Heater

2 Answers

The heater is less than two years old and it blows cold air, and not heat!


Make sure with a multimeter that the heater is having the continuity and the switch is contacting correctly . If so the heater must work.
If not the coil can be faulty or the switch can be defective.

Sep 28, 2010 | Lasko 5520 Ceramic Compact Heater

1 Answer

Using ceramic briquettes with lp gas grill


Many people enjoy using Lp/gas grills for their ease of use and efficiency. Frustrations caused by flare ups and hot spots encourage the use of a wide variety of briquettes and other products. Ceramic briquettes are most commonly used because they provide an even heating surface and last for several uses.
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  2. Gas grills most often use ceramic briquettes, lava rocks or, more recently, ceramic tiles in order to distribute heat. Ceramic briquettes come in the traditional shape, lava rocks are similar to those used in landscaping, and tiles only differ from briquettes by shape. Traditional charcoal briquettes can be used, though they maintain several disadvantages. Use
  3. Place briquettes, tiles, or lava rocks in a solid layer on a screen between the heating element and the grill surface, making sure to leave space for air to circulate. Light the grill and check to make sure that all areas of the heating element are covered, filling any empty spaces. Advantages
  4. Ceramic briquettes, tiles and lava rocks all serve the same purpose. The advantage comes from their ability to reduce flare-ups and hot spots. They can also be used several times, minimizing set-up and making cleaning easier. Traditional charcoal briquettes are cheap and easy to find. They also provide the smoky flavor associated with traditional charcoal barbecuing. Disadvantages
  5. Ceramic briquettes, tiles, and lava rocks are not as easy to find as traditional charcoal briquettes and are more expensive. Traditional charcoal briquettes do not repel run-off from food, but rather retain it, causing hot spots and flare ups. Charcoal briquettes also need to be replaced after each use and are harder to clean up. Warnings
  6. Any additional product placed inside a lp/gas grill should not come in contact with the heating element. Doing so can cause increased stress to the grill, as well as clog vital gas ports. Always maintain a clean grill. A buildup of old briquettes can cause inadequate performance.

May 01, 2010 | Ducane 30400040 Stainless Steel Grill

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