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Which countries around the world use wind energy to produce electricity?

What are some countries around the world use wind energy to produce electricity?

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India obviously

Posted on Feb 13, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Is China cancelling building coal burning plants as reported in the New York Times?


possible-- as it the chinese governments intention to use renewable energy
to that effect they are producing and using solar panels just about everywhere , converting dams to hydro power and wind where possible
it is because of the immense pollution problems in all of the major cities

Apr 02, 2017 | The Computers & Internet

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Laser Lidar Guidance Adds Power to Wind Turbines The wind industry may soon be...


Laser Lidar Guidance Adds Power to Wind Turbines

The wind industry may soon be dependent on a different kind of environmental awareness that has more to do with lasers than ecology.
A new laser pointer 100mw system that can be mounted on wind turbines allows them to prepare for the wind rushing toward their blades.

The lasers act like sonar for the wind, bouncing off microscopically small particulates and back to a fiber optic detector. That data is fed to an on-board processor that generates a three-dimensional view of the wind speed and direction. Subtle adjustments in the turbine blade's angle to the window allows it to capture more energy and protect itself in case of strong gusts.
The startup company that developed the Vindicator system, Catch the Wind, recently deployed a wind unit on a Nebraska Public Power District turbine. It increased the production of the unit (.pdf) by more than 10 percent, according to the company's white paper. If those numbers held across the nations' 35 gigawatts of installed wind capacity, the laser lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) sensors could add more than 3.5 gigawatts of wind capacity without adding a single additional turbine.
"This is what they call disruptive technology," said William Fetzer, vice president of business development for Catch the Wind. "There are roughly 80,000 to 90,000 wind turbines out in the world, and they don't have this technology."
Wind farms are only as good as their data. There have been revolutions in assessing wind resources over long time-scales, but the short-term gustiness of the wind has remained a problem.
Current wind turbines rely on wind-measuring instruments known as anemometers that are mounted to the back of the turbine's gear-housing unit, called a nacelle. The data from the wind is fed to a computer that optimizes the blades' configuration to capture the most energy from the wind.

In many cases, cup anemometers, which took their current form in the 1930s, are still used. They work well enough, but have to be positioned behind the blades, which subjects them to turbulence. And, importantly, they can only tell you how fast the wind was blowing after it passed. That doesn't help you with a freak gust of wind or any of the odd behavior that renewable energy developers have caught the wind exhibiting.
Fort Felker, director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center, said he saw great potential in laser pointer 200mw lidar and similar sound-wave-based systems generally.
"Once you have a detailed knowledge of the coming wind, there are a lot of opportunities," said Felker told Wired.com.
While he estimates the amount of energy that could be captured is below Catch the Wind's 10 percent, he said the systems could really help reduce the wear-and-tear on machines caused by strong winds hitting improperly positioned blades.
"Researchers have already demonstrated that substantial reduction of loads is certainly possible," Felker said.
laser lidar, despite first being demonstrated for wind measurement in the 1970s, has been slow to catch on. The systems have been too expensive.
"Widespread deployment of the technique has so far been hampered by the expense and complexity of laser lidar systems," a 2005 NREL research report found. "However, the recent development of laser lidar systems based on optical fiber and components from the telecommunications industry promises large improvements in cost, compactness, and reliability so that it becomes viable to consider the deployment of such systems on large wind turbines."
Now, even the most venerable R&D testing group in the world, the Danish National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy's Ris?e wind outfit, is working on a turbine-mounted laser lidar system, though they only claim a 5 percent increase in electricity production.

Catch the Wind grew out of a small-business grant that the company's predecessor, Optical Air Data Systems, received from the U.S. military. They developed a laser lidar system for helicopters working in the dusty Iraq and Afghanistan terrain. The company developed their rugged and relatively lightweight laser lidar systems by marrying aerospace knowledge with emerging telecommunications tech like better fiber optic cables and laser pointer 300mw diodes.
Still, Catch the Wind may have a tough road ahead. The energy industry is notoriously risk averse. Besides, wind electricity in many places is already cheaper than wholesale electricity prices.
Erin Edholm, a representative for National Wind, a wind-farm developer that's put in more than 4,000 megawatts of turbines, said that the company's wind resource assessment team "has not used [laser lidar] or considered using it to date."
But that doesn't dim the hopes of Catch the Wind's Fetzer for the company's ultimate success.
"When you do disruptive technologies, it takes time," Fetzer said. "People don't believe that things are as bad as they are until they can see what we can do."
It helps that they don't need the wind turbine manufacturers to incorporate their technology to jump start their business. They've got what's known as a "bolt-on" solution, meaning it can be attached to existing turbines. They don't need manufacturers to incorporate their product to sell it to wind farms.
Still, some wind farmers may worry that the warranties they have on their turbines would be voided by adding a laser lidar system. Fetzer said Catch the Wind is working out the warranty issues.
General Electric, which is the largest wind turbine manufacturer in the United States, is not using or developing laser lidar specifically, either. Catch the Wind did recently sell one of their machines to a large, unnamed turbine manufacturer.
Though Catch the Wind is not discussing pricing for their products, Fetzer maintains that their customers will make their money back in the three-to-five year range that he says wind developers are looking for. The 2005 NREL report calculated a preliminary cost for a generic laser lidar system of less than $95,000, once production was up and running.
The development of controls for capturing the most energy from the wind has been a constant theme in wind energy research. But it's not always the company that develops the technology that reaps the rewards from its commercialization. Wind turbines in the 1980s struggled mightily to convert the wind's gusty capriciousness into steady rotary power.
At the time, the turbine's rotor had to turn at a constant rate. Researchers realized that their machines could operate over a larger range of speeds if the rotor could speed up or slow down in response to the wind, but they would need power electronics to translate the power into electricity suitable for the grid.

A multimillion dollar R&D program launched by laser pointer U.S. Windpower and the Electric Power Research Institute to commercialize a variable-speed rotor resulted in a mostly defective turbine design that helped push U.S. Windpower out of business. The variable-speed rotor went on to become a standard part of wind turbine designs.
Catch the Wind obviously is hoping not to suffer the same fate. They are exploring a variety of business models including sharing the revenue from the extra power they say their systems can generate. If they don't generate any more electricity, the wind turbine owner doesn't pay anything. If they do, Catch the Wind gets half the take.

on May 19, 2016 | Infiniter 2000 Green 532nm Laser Pointer

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Should people invest renewable energy?


While it's fairly easy to fit solar panels on your roof to generate electricity - and save money - investing in funds that hold the wind and solar firms offers more of a challenge.
It sounds like the perfect investment. Equip your house with solar panels and look forward to dramatically reduced utility bills and the potential to earn a handsome return by selling any excess energy to the electricity grid.
Thousands of people across the country have already embraced this idea since the government introduced the Feed-in Tariffs (FIT) Scheme in April 2010 to encourage the uptake of small-scale renewable and low-carbon technologies.
Greg Shreeve, the insight manager at the Energy Saving Trust, believes getting solar panels installed is a no- brainer for many people. The potential benefits to be enjoyed, he argues, more than makeup for the upfront costs.
"The technology pays for itself within 11 years and will go on generating electricity for your home," he says. "It's a great way to actually start making money when energy prices are rising. It's free electricity and low-carbon technology, so a winner all round."

Apr 02, 2017 | Computers & Internet

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Can hydrogen run a generator to produce hydrogen perpetually?


No. We all can't be versed on every aspect of our world but some parts are important to keep us from falling into poor investments and scams. There are several laws of thermodynamics, essentially how energy works in our world and are a fundamental part of our understanding of physics.

One of those laws suggests that energy like arithmetic will not change unless something operates to change the numbers. The energy that is put into a system (2 + 2) is always going to equal the energy that goes out of a system (4) So just as 2 + 2 is not going to suddenly equal 5 or 6 the energy we put into our system is not somehow going to create more energy. The best we can hope for is to create a system that will somehow gather more energy from another source like solar panels. In this case it is like saying 2 + 2 + 1 equals something more.

In your suggestion you want to add hydrogen to a generator and then use the resulting electricity to produce hydrogen by splitting water and then use that hydrogen to run the engine. But you are leaving out some of the elements. The engine is probably no more than about 25% efficient. That means that 75% of the energy in the hydrogen fuel you use is used to create heat and is lost to friction. So far your equation then looks like 2 + 2 - 3 . The generator also loses some energy to friction. Add to this it takes more energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen than we recover when hydrogen and oxygen combine to produce some excess energy. So in every step along the way we are losing our desired goal to losses in energy like heat and friction.

But even if the system were somehow perfect it could not be any more perfect than to lose no energy. You will not be creating new new energy with such a system. Even if we could get it to run forever the system is not going to give us new energy we could use for something else as every bit would be used to run the system. This is why we say that efficiency can never be greater than 1 or 100%. And we can not have "over unity" or "perpetual motion" machines.

If we want "free energy" what we could do is make solar panels. And then use those solar panels to gather additional energy from a source outside the system and then produce hydrogen from solar energy. What we can't do is use a solar panel to produce electricity for a light that shines on the solar panel as once again this would be a closed system with no energy flowing into the system.

When it comes to energy systems look for the source of the energy. If it is supposed to be coming from inside the system perpetually then it is likely a scam. If there is an outside source it may be useful depending upon the economics and how much energy we get relative to our energy investment.

Jan 04, 2017 | Green Living

3 Answers

Whats the best renewable energy source?


The beat renewable energy sources are those sources of energy which can be renewed easily and which is eco-friendly in nature.
Some of the best sources of renewable energy are:
1. Solar energy: The most efficient renewable energy source. The sun rays are absorbed by the solar cells on the solar panel and later it is used as electricity.
2. Wind energy: Used in turbines to make them run and generate electricity.
3. Water energy: Water has been used in hydroelectric plants to produce electricity.
4. Nuclear energy: Nuclear fission is the main source of energy today. The energy generated by this fission is used to produce electricity.

clean-energy-300x300-h5e4c0qyooy4xzhh2iqsf0gc-4-0.jpg

Jan 04, 2017 | Green Living

1 Answer

How does a wind turbine work?


A Wind turbine operates on a simple principle .The energy in the wind turns 2 or 3 propellor like blades around a rotor .The rotor is connected to the main shaft which spins a generator to create electricity. Wind turbines are mounted on a tower to capture the most wind energy.

Aug 31, 2014 | Vacuums

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Where is the world's largest onshore wind farm?


For details check out this WEB site.
http://www.treehugger.com/renewable-energy/worldatms-largest-onshore-wind-farm-909-megawatts-to-be-built-in-oregon.html

May 01, 2013 | Renewable Energy

1 Answer

What are New World wines?


The term 'new world' refers to wine produced in new world wine producing countries such as New Zealand, America, Australia, Chile, Argentina, or South Africa- in essence, all wine producing countries outside of Europe. They are referred to as New World because these countries did not start producing wine until the 15th, 16th, or 17th centuries.

Feb 03, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

2 Answers

What country produces the most apples in the world?


China is the world leading producer of apples, with about 41% of the total apples production per year. US comes in second place, with about 6% of the world apples production.

Jan 17, 2013 | Cooking

1 Answer

Glass cover exploded in millions pieces.luckily nobody got hurt.


energy from tightening the screw on the plastic cover of the glass lid, resulted in a series of molecular transitions, that reacted with the metal around the glass to produce the shattering of the lid. amazingly producing a new source of energy that should be investigated. the company should recall all glass lids asap, and exchange them with some inert cover material. someone may be seriously injured.
The glass lid on our unit exploded yesterday scaring the heck out of my wife who is still picking glass out of

Jan 14, 2011 | Rival WS60T Non Stick Electric Wok

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