Question about Polaroid SX-70 Film Camera

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Light meter Film overexposed must adjust light meter

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The light meter in an SX-70 is not adjustable. If the film is overexposed either the film is bad or something is blocking the light meter eye. Look for dust or debris on the eye surface and clean.

Posted on Jan 06, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Adjusting exposure in snow scenes


You generally need to overexpose a stop or two. Without knowing the model of your Canon, I can't give you specific instructions. If your camera has an exposure compensation feature, you can use it. If not, you'll have to set the film speed lower by a stop or two.

Feb 06, 2014 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Edge Of Scan Overexposed


If the slides are ok , and not overexposed themself, brown discoloration on the side means a problem with the scanner lamp.

Oct 05, 2008 | Nikon CoolScan V ED Film Scanner

1 Answer

The camera will not expose pictures properly; they are underexposed inside, or overexposed outside. The exposure adjustment feature is set in the middle or neutral mode. Changing the iso does not help. ...


It sounds like the light meter in the camera itself is probably broken and needs to be taken to a repair shop. Try using it in manual mode until you can get it fixed.

Mar 22, 2011 | Canon EOS-20D Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do i take 12 dark, 12 light and 12 perfect pictures with 400 black and white film on a vivitar 3800n camera?


For normal exposure, set the ISO dial to 400. Meter normally, adjusting the shutter speed and/or lens aperture until the green LED in the center lights up.

For dark pictures, you want to underexpose about two stops. One way is to meter as above, then stop down the aperture two stops (larger F/numbers) or increase the shutter speed two stops (larger number) or a combination of the two. Alternatively, set the ISO dial to 1600 and meter normally.

For light pictures, you want to overexpose about two stops. Meter normally then open up the lens two stops (smaller F/numbers) or slow the shutter speed two stops (smaller numbers) or a combination. Alternatively, set the ISO dial to 100 and meter normally.

You can also experiment. Over/underexpose one stop, then two, then three, then four, and even five. You might want to take a notebook with you and write down what you're doing. Record both the setting and how many stops over/under it is. When you get the film back, you can refer to your notes and see what happened.

Jan 25, 2011 | Vivitar Photography

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I took 4 rolls of film in for development but when I got them back all of them were either very under or overexposed despite taking all the pictures according to the light meter in the viewfinder of my...


Are you looking at the picture as in a print OR are you holding the negative up to the light and looking at it that way. Don't touch the negatives, they should be in a protective sleeve but you can see through it. You should be able to see if the spacing between the frames is messed up and if you have lighter and darker negatives. Looking at a print from an automated one hour service isn't worth the time of day to determine a problem. The Pentax K1000 is the work horse of the century for students learning photography and a lot of them have seen extensive use, also the camera is quite old. What I expect is if the negatives are showing overlapping frames AND the exposure is off sometimes over and other times underexposed then the camera needs service lubrication and adjustment. It's great that the light meter is working but the shutter speed could be off and the advance is skipping giving the overlap. I don't know where you are in this world but in Canada that's a $80.00 to $120.00 fix and have the repair person change the light seals while he/she has it apart.
The Pentax K1000 is still a great camera it's up to you whether or not to spend the money. I can't tell you what to do but I can suggest that if you are going to shoot film you find some place that does it with a little more human touch. Hope this was a help

Jan 24, 2011 | Pentax K1000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Pictures look overexposed


Hello

the best way to avoid these lighting problems is to adjust your aperture settings, your shutter speed and your film speed when shooting.


for more information visit this site


http://www.photoshopsupport.com/tutorials/jennifer/fix-overexposed.html


Good luck

Dec 07, 2010 | Casio Cameras

1 Answer

Bronica AE II E Finder Owners Manual


Since I never use a TTL flash with my Bronica's, I'll give you my suggestion for a great solution. Using your TTL Metz flash, (make sure you've connected the TTL cord for Bronica ETRsi) take 8 shots at different apertures on A (Automatic), then take 8 shots at different apertures on M (Manual). I realize this will waste one 120 roll of film, but one negative will stand out as your perfect exposure. Yes, whenever you reduce the ISO in half, your basically overexposing the film by one f/stop. Just remember that this overexposes everything your shooting from foreground to background. With flash, this may cause your highlights to wash out, but any good lab could print for the highlights and make the background go darker. I used to shoot Vericolor at ISO 125 instead of it's rated ISO of 160. 
Fotobean

Jan 21, 2009 | Bronica ETR-Si Medium Format Camera

1 Answer

Overexposed highlights


Normally the problem is simply that the pictures are slightly overexposed. Despite all the fancy names manufacturers stick on their metering systems, the camera doesn't know what you're taking a picture of. They basically strive to make the entire scene a medium gray. As a result, some highlights may be blown out, just as some shadows may drop out. Generally, dropped shadows are more acceptable than blown highlights.

If a picture is really important, bracket. Take one shot at the metered exposure, then another a stop under (and perhaps one a stop over, if you're feeling paranoid). It was common for a National Geographic photographer to spend an entire roll on one shot, trying different light angles and exposures. After all, film is far cheaper than air fare and hotel rooms.

One advantage of shooting digital is that you can see the results immediately, and correct for blown out highlights.

Nov 11, 2008 | Contax 167 MT 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Film = no light meter


jackson rook,

the speed of the film may be to high if your camera has dx coding contacts in the film chamber. otherwise---- film in camera or not it has no effect on meter operation. move the advance lever to the right slightly and push down on the shutter release button slightly to turn meter on.

Sep 10, 2008 | Vivitar V4000 50MM 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Reading the light meter on my camera


You didn't mention whether your Rebel was a film version or digital, but as best I can see from the manuals they are quite similar with regards to your question.

The camera does have a light metering function, but you won't see a needle like some of the older film cameras had. Instead, you will see in the viewfinder the shutter speed and the aperture settings. For example, 500 4.5 would indicate that the camera has determined that the shutter speed will be 1/500th of a second and the aperture f/4.5 to properly expose the shot. Depending on what mode you are in, you can control one or both of these numbers. If either number (or both) are flashing, it indicates that the shot will be overexposed or underexposed, and you must take some type of corrective action that the camera cannot do itself with the current mode settings.

Canon has manuals available online for all the digital Rebels and many of the film Rebels. See this link. Select EOS (SLR) Camera Systems in the top box, and choose the appropriate categories in the next two boxes, then click Go.

May 20, 2008 | Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 Lens

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