Question about Nikon COOLPIX P90 Digital Camera

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Camera won't take photos, battery is fully charged, I performed a reset using wrench, there is a red circle in the viewfinder or it projects a red light from front of camera but will not take pictures, leaving on vaacation in a few days of course, 2nd major issue I've had with this camera, hate it

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

jackboy
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SOURCE: Nikon Coolpix 3200 won't take pictures

Wat sort of error messages are you getting when you press shutter?

Posted on Aug 16, 2007

  • 370 Answers

SOURCE: my d40 won`t take pictures

Try Blow cleaning the Memory card slot ... sometimes dust does that

Posted on Oct 12, 2008

  • 111 Answers

SOURCE: Nikon D40 problem, often will not take pictures

Chuck,

Sounds like your lens might be set to M rather than M/A. Try that and let me know.

Posted on May 14, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Nikon D50 - clock and battery icons blinking

Hi
I had the same problem and rectified it by going to Nikons website , follow this link for the answer:

http://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/10601/p/19%2C244/c/241/kw/Clock/r_id/127673

Posted on Mar 26, 2010

nic_percival
  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: My Nikon Coolpix S2550 says the battery is low when I need to use the flash - but I have fully charged the battery please help

I have a mains/USB charger and my Nikon Coolpix S2550 does not charge from it but WILL from a laptop. The clue is the flash LED should flash, on charge, slowly - less than one a second. The 'wall' charger makes that flash perhaps twice a second.
And of course the laptop will tell you the charge status.

Posted on Jul 09, 2012

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1 Answer

Nikon Coolpix S9400 - the monitor has gone blank, although camera is not "dead".


The Display is OLED and when it is off it is really OFF.
FYI:
This camera has FIVE (5) Brightness levels for the display. The Brightness is usually set in the TOOL (wrench) menu.

If you are positive the batteries are good, fresh and or fully charged it is MY OPINION that the camera is non functional. The Viewfinder is critical for camera operation. Sorry I am not much help here it seems this camera needs either repair or replacement.

Dec 03, 2016 | Nikon Coolpix S9400

1 Answer

Won turn fully charged battery


How long you have the battery? I suggest you to fully discharged the battery and then charge it as much as you can, do this circle for several times. Hope this can help

Jul 23, 2013 | Fuji FinePix A330 Digital Camera

2 Answers

My Nikon Coolpix S2550 says the battery is low when I need to use the flash - but I have fully charged the battery please help


try leaving the camera on to drain the battery down, then try charging it again.. or could be a bad battery

Dec 30, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

I advise a high school yearbook and we shoot a d100. Today it's too dark to see through the viewfinder (yes the lens cap is removed), and i ger the r06 error. I've reset the camera, removed and...


First, the "r06" message is NOT an error code. It indicates the number of shots remaining in the internal memory buffer, before the camera must prevent additional shutter actuations so that it may transfer those images already in the buffer to the memory card. This "r" number will decrease with each shot taken in rapid succession until it reaches 0. The shutter release will no longer work until the buffer is transferred to the memory card, then shooting may continue again.

As far as not being able to even see through the viewfinder, it sounds like something may be obstructing the light from reaching the meter and viewfinder. The problem is most likely the position of mirror inside the camera body. With the lens off the body, the mirror should be plainly visible at about a 45 degree angle to the opening. A side view drawing of this is below. The solid red line is the mirror in the normal position. The red dashed line is the up position of the mirror when the shutter is released.

steve_con_93.jpg

When the mirror is in the "normal" position, the light from the lens is projected on a screen so that the image is visible in the viewfinder for composing and can be metered. When in the "up" position (when the shutter release is fully depressed), the light from the lens is projected on the camera's sensor for as long as set by the manual settings or program; based on ISO, aperture, etc. At the end of this time, the mirror returns to the "normal" position.

If your D100's mirror is not in the lowered 45 degree angle position, the image seen in the viewfinder is inside the camera - not that which the lens would project. Hence, the dark viewfinder, long exposure times and - I'm guessing - severely overexposed pictures because way too much light is striking the sensor because the meter is only seeing darkness.

If the mirror is ok, with the lens removed from the body, look for the aperture lever as shown in the yellow circle in the picture below:

steve_con_92.jpg

By default, the aperture is at minimum. The camera moves the lever from this position to full open (and anywhere between) as needed. You should gently move the lever to the other end of its travel to open the aperture to maximum. Point the lens away from a light source but preferably at a light colored background. Look through the lens. There should be no obstructions and be clear. Next, look at a dark colored background to find the same results. If you want, you can even allow sunlight to shine through the lens onto a sheet of paper (like a magnifying glass). The result should be a bright circle with no obstructions. Obstructions in the lens will prevent the meter in the camera from getting accurate information about the scene and if significant enough, prevent viewing through the viewfinder.

You may wish to have the camera & lens professionally cleaned and serviced to repair a mirror or lens issue.

If this was helpful, please rate it as such. Good luck!

Oct 04, 2011 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I,ve not been able to see anything on "DCR-HC32 -HC-42" LCD screen, but its working properly if we press it blindly, otherwise its viewfinder is o.k


If the touch screen of the Camcorder is not working, please follow the troubleshooting steps.

Please make sure that you're using fully charged batteries.

Turn off the Camcorder and turn ON again and check the operation.

Try resetting the Camcorder by pressing the reset button above the hand strap.

shajanrs_39.jpg

Note: In the above picture, 10 represent the reset button.


If the issue persists again, please perform LCD screen Calibration and check if that helps.

Please follow the steps below to perform the LCD Calibration

shajanrs_40.jpg

shajanrs_41.jpg

shajanrs_42.jpg

shajanrs_43.jpg









Perform a power resetting of the Camcorder. To perform power resetting, please remove the battery pack, turn the Power switch to ON for more than 15 seconds, turn the Power switch to OFF position and then reinsert the battery pack.


If the issue persists even after performing all the above-mentioned steps, service is required.

I hope this information will help you to resolve the touch screen issue of the Camcorder.

Feb 08, 2011 | Sony Handycam DCR-HC42 Mini DV Digital...

1 Answer

I have a new refurbished kodak easyshare c160 -- the camera will not last but for one or two pictures without completely draining the batteries. i have tried about 4 new sets of photo batteries....is this...


Solution: As digital cameras become more advanced and include more features, the power needed to keep them functioning has also increased. That means that typical alkaline batteries likely won’t do more than power your camera for a few shots before running out of juice. Sometimes, your digital camera may not power on at all if the inserted alkaline batteries aren’t fully charged or powerful enough. Rather than carry along dozens of alkaline batteries for a single photo shoot, you can save money by purchasing rechargeable NiMH (nickel-metal hydride) batteries. Rechargeable batteries can be purchased with a charger that you plug into a wall outlet, and they fully charge in one to five hours depending on the charger and the type of batteries you’re using.

If you’re already using rechargeable batteries but are experiencing short battery life with your digital camera, it’s likely time to replace your rechargeable batteries with new ones. Depending on the number of charging cycles you perform (how many times you discharge and recharge your batteries), rechargeable batteries typically last for two to three years before they no longer hold a full charge. You may also ensure that you’re charging your rechargeable batteries directly before use. As batteries sit unused for extended periods of time, they automatically lose some of their charge.

There are many ways you can conserve battery life while using your digital camera, too. For starters, if your camera has a viewfinder in addition to an LCD, use the viewfinder to frame your shots and turn the LCD off because LCDs draw a lot of power. If you prefer to use the LCD, you can still conserve battery life if you refrain from looking at each picture on the screen after you take it.

Jun 13, 2010 | Kodak EasyShare C160 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am in Pune 411004 in India and have purchased Samsung digital es 15 camera recently. Original 2 aa Alkaline batteries have been completely used up.when I replaced these with 2 new eveready batteries...


Solution: As digital cameras become more advanced and include more features, the power needed to keep them functioning has also increased. That means that typical alkaline batteries likely won’t do more than power your camera for a few shots before running out of juice. Sometimes, your digital camera may not power on at all if the inserted alkaline batteries aren’t fully charged or powerful enough. Rather than carry along dozens of alkaline batteries for a single photo shoot, you can save money by purchasing rechargeable NiMH (nickel-metal hydride) batteries. Rechargeable batteries can be purchased with a charger that you plug into a wall outlet, and they fully charge in one to five hours depending on the charger and the type of batteries you’re using.

If you’re already using rechargeable batteries but are experiencing short battery life with your digital camera, it’s likely time to replace your rechargeable batteries with new ones. Depending on the number of charging cycles you perform (how many times you discharge and recharge your batteries), rechargeable batteries typically last for two to three years before they no longer hold a full charge. You may also ensure that you’re charging your rechargeable batteries directly before use. As batteries sit unused for extended periods of time, they automatically lose some of their charge.

There are many ways you can conserve battery life while using your digital camera, too. For starters, if your camera has a viewfinder in addition to an LCD, use the viewfinder to frame your shots and turn the LCD off because LCDs draw a lot of power. If you prefer to use the LCD, you can still conserve battery life if you refrain from looking at each picture on the screen after you take it.

Jun 13, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

Olympus C-765 - won't take photos anymore. Memory card is fine and camera has worked perfectly for the past two years. Does anybody have a solution? The camera seems to function as normal, but when I press...


Reset the menus to default or factory settings.
Then test the camera again.
Make sure that the battery is fully charged or new.
You might consider to buy a new battery (Ebay is a good place) for this camera. Then test.
Problems like this can show up when the battery is weak or not fully charged.
You may try to remove the battery for 24 hours and then after try it again.

Apr 15, 2010 | Olympus Camedia C-765 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Red Flash mark while taking photo


It sounds to me like you are not waiting for the camera to charge the flash when turning the camera on or between shots. It seems you are using 1700mAh batteries and most modern digital cameras are better off using 2500mAh batteries. Your camera was released in September 2006 so it is considered "modern". With 1700mAh batteries, your flash (warm-up) recycle time time will be rather long or the amperage may not be enough to fully charge the flash unit. I highly recommend Duracell 2500mAh rechargeable batteries.

Oct 12, 2007 | Olympus FE-170 Digital Camera

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