Question about 1995-1997 Chevy 1500 Truck Ignition Starter Alarm Switch

1 Answer

No fire to my 1995 chevy cheyenne 350 5.7l

It was sitting at an ideal and died. I have replaced the distributor and ignition coil and fuel pump. I have no spark still and don't know where to go next.

Posted by Anonymous on

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  • Chevrolet Master
  • 1,051 Answers

Is the dist. all new inside and out. There is a module in the dist. that can cause your problem and a secondary coil on the shaft of the dist. but I would think no fire would be more of a module problem. You can take it to a Autozone and they can check to see if it is good.

Posted on May 14, 2017

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: distributor cap firing order 1993 chevy cheyenne truck v6

Firing order is 1-6-5-4-3-2 cyls. # 1-3-5 on drivers side front to back and cyls. # 2-4-6 passenger side front to back.

Posted on Nov 30, 2008

grease16
  • 58 Answers

SOURCE: 92 CHEVY BLAZER K1500 WON'T START

try messing with the radiator because it is most likely overheating

Posted on Dec 02, 2008

Mike258
  • 1498 Answers

SOURCE: how to troubleshoot 1993 chevy Z71 pcm

Hi Nsilguero,

I apologize for the delay in responding.

From your description, I'm leaning toward a timing chain problem, first stretching, then skipping and finally breaking.

If you're getting voltage to the coil and still getting no spark, there is a test I'd like you to try.

Take off the distributor cap and have someone turn the engine over while you eyeball the rotor. Is it spinning?

This going to take some back and forth interaction. Comment me back with the results. We will proceed from there.

Mike

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

sledge1863
  • 149 Answers

SOURCE: 1995 lumina cranks but will not start

Sounds like it has jumped timing, dont know which engine you have so could be chain or belt.

Posted on Mar 23, 2009

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 97 5.7 vortec I am getting no spark at

check to make sure there is power going to the ignition coil, can simply be done by using a test light, if there is power to the coil check the coil wire and plug wires, could also be a loose or broken ground wire, check to make sure all grounds are tight and free of corrosion and rust, could change the camshaft positioning sensor too but that should'nt have anthing to do with the spark

Posted on Mar 20, 2011

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1 Answer

No fire to distributor


I'm sure you know the fuel pump won't have any affect on the ignition.
You may need a repair book to get the procedures and wiring diagrams to troubleshoot the ignition system.
I am assuming a new coil came with the replacement distributor. Did the cap and rotor get replaced too ?
Do you have voltage going to the distributor coil ?
Is the rotor turning when the engine is cranked ?

Jan 18, 2013 | 1995 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

I was accelerating the other day and all of a sudden my car starts bucking and losing acceleration. After about a minute it dies completlely. I wait a few minutes and try to start it and it starts barely...


A few Ideas from the 1995 Nissan Sentra maintenance manual - Troubleshooting section

Priority Action Part Type Cause
1 Inspect Battery Battery Discharged or Faulty.
2 Inspect Battery Cable Corroded, Broken, Shorted or Poorly Connected Battery Cable.
3 Inspect Fuel Filter Clogged or Dirty Fuel Filter.
3 Inspect Distributor Cap Distributor Cap Cracked or Burned.
5 Inspect Coil - Ignition Faulty Ignition Coil.
6 Inspect Wireset Worn, Damaged or Faulty Spark Plug Wire(s).
7 Inspect Spark Plug Incorrectly Gapped or Fouled Spark Plug(s).
8 Inspect Starter Starter Motor Faulty.
9 Inspect Fuel Pump Low Fuel Pressure.
10 Inspect Solenoid Switch Faulty Starter Solenoid Switch.
11 Inspect Relay - Fuel Pumpat Faulty Fuel Pump Relay.
12 Inspect Fuel Injector Pressure Regulator Faulty Fuel Injector Pressure Regulator.
13 Inspect Ignition Switch Improperly Connected or Faulty Ignition Switch.
14 Inspect Starter Drive Faulty Starter Drive.
15 Inspect Fuel Injector Dirty or Worn Fuel Injectors.
16 Inspect Fuel Pump Strainer Clogged or Dirty Fuel Pump Strainerat.
17 Inspect Engine Control Computer Incorrect Operating Information Being Delivered and Sent From The EEC.
18 Inspect Fuel Tank Fuel Tank Empty.
19 Inspect Carburetor Carburetor Flooded or Faulty Choke.
20 Inspect Distributor Worn, Loose, or Incorrectly Installed Distributor.

Mar 26, 2011 | 1995 Nissan Sentra

1 Answer

1979 chevy van not getting spark.was running fine day before.turns over fine,getting fuel.could it be the module


First thing is what condition are the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires in?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil located in the top of the distributor cap is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Bat" or "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position. Then check the secondary resistance to the ignition coil.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


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Jul 29, 2010 | 1979 Chevrolet C/K 3500

1 Answer

I have an 88 Chevy Cheyenne 4.3 V6 with a throttle body. It is acting like gas is not getting into the jets. I checked the fuel filter, fuses, relays, wiring to the jets, and still can't find the...


If the fuel pump does run and there is fuel pressure but there is no fuel injector pulse to the fuel injectors at the top of the throttle body, then the problem is either with the distributor, the ECM, or the wiring between the ignition module inside of the distributor and the ECM.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

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Jul 13, 2010 | Chevrolet C1500 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 95 gmc will not atart i changed the fuel tank


If you do have fuel pressure, but there is no fuel getting into the cylinders to run the engine, then the engine does not have an injector signal or pulse to open the fuel injectors.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 24, 2010 | 1997 GMC Sierra K2500

1 Answer

After driving for 45 minutes the car starts hesitating, putting, as if its not getting gas, then shuts off.I let it sit for 20 minutes its fine for another 25 to 45 minutes


That is the classical sign of a control module over-heating or an electric fuel pump that is faulty.

The ignition module located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil. A faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 20, 2010 | 1989 Cadillac Sedan DeVille

1 Answer

My1998 chevy blazer only runs for a few seconds. I replace,fuel pump,filter,plugs,wires,injectors, brain box,cap,rootor.lots of gass in line.what do you think?ITS LIKE A RELAY OR SOMETHING IS KEEPING THE...


It would seem like a problem with the ECU or the fuel pump, but the common link between those two systems is the ignition module that is located on the distributor under the distributor cap, and that module is actually responsible for the fuel pump signal to run the fuel pump, the dwell signal to cause the ignition coil to fire, and also the signal that the ECU uses to time and fire the injectors, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto parts stores.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Jun 17, 2010 | 1998 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

I can crank the truck with no problem. After it idles about 15-20 mins (i think it may reach a certain temp)it wants to shut off. It will not crank again until it sits for about 30 to 45 mins. I have...


The ignition module on this model is bad to go bad,When this truck dies like that again,check to see if it is firing.If it is not giving any spark,replace the ignition module,if it does not fix the problem,replace the pick up coil in the distributor.Ignition coils can cause this also,but the symptom sounds like the module.If I can help,let me know,If you have spark after the engine dies(check for spark after it dies)then check the fuel pressure,and the fuel filter.If the fuel pressure is fine,then the module and the pick up coil need replacing.

Aug 29, 2009 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

3 Answers

Broco died at red light and wont get fire at all


ck all fuses and fusible links and relays

Aug 22, 2009 | 1989 Ford Bronco

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