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Number of sugar molecules in DNA section containing 3 base pairs?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: a small battleof mineral water contains 13.5 mol

About 10^40

Posted on Jan 26, 2010

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What doe's D.N.A. mean


Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is the molecule containing the genetic instructions that determine hereditary traits.

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Orange trees


All plants make their own sugars or starches or oils out of hydro-carbons that they manufacture from carbon-dioxide from the air, and from the destruction of water molecules where it takes the hydrogen and gives off oxygen in the process. Therefore more sunlight and more water will produce more sugars.

Oct 18, 2013 | Computers & Internet

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How many atoms of hyrdrogen gas in tow moles how


Hydrogen gas is a diatomic substance: Each molecule contains two hydrogen atoms.
A mole of hydrogen gas contains 6.02*10^23 hydrogen molecules, but since each molecule contains 2 hydrogen atom you have 2*6.02*10^23=?
The formula for nitric acid is HNO_3. It contains 5 atoms regardless of the elements
Now, 0.25 moles contain 0.25* 6.02*10^23 molecules oh nitric acid, ans since each molecule contains 5 atoms then 0.25 moles contain 0.25*5*6.02*10^23=? atoms
0.25*1*6.02*10^23 of hydrogen atoms, and the same number of nitrogen atoms and 0.25*3*6.02*10^23 oxygen atoms.

Oct 01, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

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Instruction manual for csi dna lab kit


Csi Dna Laboratory Instructions - Website of letosaga!

letosaga.jimdo.com/2012/10/11/csi-dna-laboratory-instructions/
Oct 11, 2012 - The kit offers instructions for conducting 10 experiments and provides.... Comments about Bowen Hill Edu Science CSI DNA Laboratory Kit: ...

Instruction manual for csi dna lab kit - Fixya

www.fixya.com/support/t11150204-instruction_manual_csi_dna_lab_kit
Jan 5, 2012 - instruction manual for csi dna lab kit - Planet Toys Csi Dna Lab question.

[PDF]Crime Scene Investigator PCR Basics™ Kit - Bio-Rad

www.bio-rad.com/webroot/web/.../10002461.pdf

Bio?Rad Laboratoriesreal-world forensic science labs. Bio-Rad is ... TH01) actually used in forensic DNAprofiling; the DNA sequence at this locus contains four ..... Much of this background information is provided in the instruction manual and the appendices.

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How many grams of aluminum acetate contain 2.24 x 1022 atoms of hydrogen?


1 Look up the formula for the aluminum acetate.
2 Count the number of Hydrogen atoms per molecule: Call that nH.
3 Dividing 2.24*10^22 by nH you get the number of molecules of acetate.
4. Divide that number by Avogadro's Number to obtain the number of moles required.
5. Multiply the number of moles by the molecular mass of the aluminum acetate (look it up or use the periodic table to calculate it), you will get the mass of aluminum acetate that contains 2.24*10^22 hydrogen atoms.

Sep 14, 2011 | Texas Instruments TI-84 Plus Calculator

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Brian Power Question? Five Associates stray off course during The Expedition and find themselves in a new Quest where there is nothing but a pile of molecules and the Avatar. Exhausted from playing all...


Every associate leaves 4/5(n-1) molecules of a pile of n molecule. This result in an awful formula for the complete process (because every time one molecule must be taken away to make the pile divisible by 5):

4/5(4/5(4/5(4/5(4/5(4/5(p-1)-1)-1)-1)-1)-1), where p is the number of molecule in the original pile, must be a whole number.


The trick is to make the number of molecule in the pile divisible by 5, by adding 4 molecules. This is possible because you can take away those 4 molecules again after taking away one fifth part of the pile: normally, 4/5(n-1) molecules are left of a pile of n molecules; now 4/5(n+4) =4/5(n-1) +4 molecules are left of a pile of n+4 molecules. And because of this, the number of molecule in the pile stays divisible by 5 during the whole process. So we are now looking for a p for which the following holds:


4/5×4/5×4/5×4/5×4/5×4/5× (p+4) = (46/56) × (p+4), where p is the number of molecule in the original pile, must be a whole number.


Therefore, the smallest (p+4) for which the above holds, is 56.

So there were p=5 power 6 - 4 = 15621 molecule in the original pile.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cell Phones

2 Answers

What is the electron dot diagram for nitrogen


The electron-dot structure (also known as the "Lewis dot structure") for N is shown below:dubblea_6.jpg The red dots represent electrons that comprise the atom's 5 valence electrons. Recall that the valence (outermost) electrons are those that are involved in chemical reactions of bonding. The rule you should apply to drawing this electron dot structure is to first draw (or imagine) a rectangle around the atom's symbol, letting the rectangle represent the atom's core electrons (not shown), those within the atom's inner (s) shell. Then place one electron on each side. That leaves the remaining electron to be placed on one of the already occupied sides to give the electron pair.

It doesn't matter what side you place this 5th electron, because the final result is the pattern shown above, 3 single dots and one pair of dots, which neatly reveals the bonding power* of N (3) - and the existence of the one electron pair, which predicts special types of reactivity you will probably appreciate in more advanced topics of this element's behavior.

*The single electrons are more reactive than the electron pair, and will readily form bonds with other atoms, such as H. This allows you to predict that N and H atoms will combine to form NH3.

How do you know there are 5 valence electrons? For the answer, refer to the following partial image of the Periodic Table of the Elements I drew using Word and SnagIT software:
dubblea.gif
Notice the number-letter labels above each column ("group") of elements, for example "5A." The letter A indicates the groups of "representative" elements, the most common elements studied in general chemistry courses. The numbers before the "A" represents the number of valence electrons surrounding each element's atoms. For example, hydrogen has one valence electron, nitrogen has 5 valence electrons, and oxygen has 6 valence electrons.

Using the rules described above for drawing electron-dot structures, how many single dots and double dots should be drawn around H? Around O? Can you predict the bonding power of each of these atoms? What molecular compounds do you predict would be formed from the reaction of H and H? What molecular compound do you predict would form between combining H atoms and O?

Hints:
Reactions tend to occur that cause the single electrons (dots) to pair up. This occurs because paired electrons are much more stable than single electrons. A strong driving force for a reaction is the going from a less stable state to a more stable state. Hydrogen atoms from H2 molecules (diatomic molecules). H and O atoms combine to form dihydrogen oxide, also known as water!

Summary:
  • A very simple set of rules allows you to predict the electron dot structures of the representative elements.
  • The electron dot structures are very useful, because they can allow you to predict the bonding power of each representative element.
  • They are also useful in guiding your prediction of the compositions of molecules that can form during reactions between their atoms (that is, how many of each element in the molecule).
  • In more advanced topics you will also be able to use electron-dot structures to predict the shapes (or geometry) of molecules, including bond angles!
  • So, learning the skill of drawing electron-dot structures is very important to mastering chemistry!

###

Nov 04, 2010 | Scientific Explorer My First Chemistry Kit

1 Answer

How do I calculate this question with the fx-115es. Find the number of moles of nitrogen in 1.75 mol N2H4?


You have 1.75 moles of hydrazine or 1.75xNa molecules of the substance. Since each molecule of N2H4 contains 2 atoms of nitrogen 1.75Na molecules contain 2x1.75xNa atoms of nitrogen. The number of moles of nitrogen is 2x1.75xNa/Na, which leaves 2x1.75 or 3.5 moles.
Your answer: 1.75 mol of hydrazine contain 3.5 mol of nitrogen atoms.

Sep 23, 2010 | Casio FX-115ES Scientific Calculator

1 Answer

The blades on my blendtec jug are stiff, any way to loosen them?


What you need to do is turn them by hand each time you use it, before you put your food in. Sugars and other deposits are often left around the blade assembly when you mix smoothies and stuff. Often this sugar is difficult to clean. Turn them by hand first to break the sugar molecules, then when you are done I would add 2 inches of water and a drop of soap. Run it for about 20 seconds and rinse. That should help the next time you use it. It also helps to use it daily. It keeps the molecules from hardening.

Jul 28, 2010 | Blendtec Extra Carafe / Jar for the Total...

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