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Lint exhaust vent

Flexible duct venting needs replacement

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Check vent/lint indicator alert

Contact Miele 1800-999-1360 for a new blower fan

Posted on Aug 22, 2009

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SOURCE: I want to put a vented dryer in my garage. Can I

It is never recomended to vent more than one appliance together. Each should be vented by itself.Dryer vents get a lot of lint so please vent it out separately.Hope this helped.

Posted on Jun 22, 2011

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1 Answer

Keep getting warning "check exhaust" on a new gas dryer. All exhaust is clear. What's going on?


The CHECK VENT duct blockage sensing system detects and alerts you to blockages in the duct work that reduce exhaust flow from the dryer. This light does not indicate any problems with your dryer. If this light blinks, it indicates that your home's exhaust system/duct work has a serious restriction

Every time the dryer is turned on, the CHECK FILTER LIGHT WILL BLINK, as a reminder to make sure the filter is clean. Always make sure the lint filter is clean before starting a new load; a clogged lint filter will increase drying times.

The Kenmore Elite dryer has a sensor that detects poor exhaust venting, and when it does, a light flashes on the control panel. This warning light does not include a mechanism to stop gas flow, but if it is allowed to flash for an extended period, poor venting may cause the dryer to overheat. As a result, a fuse might blow and disable the gas valve or ignitor. You can prevent this by diagnosing the reason for the flashing indicator light as soon as possible.

In many cases, LINT has built up somewhere in the exhaust pipes.

Check under the lint filter. Pull it out,look inside the slot it fits in, and clear all lint from this area.

Is it possible you have used the WRONG VENT MATERIAL?
Check your vent to make sure it is 4 inch rigid or semi-rigid metal ducting. If your venting is plastic or flexible foil, replace it before using the dryer.

Check your vent hood outside. You may have a restricted or damaged vent hood. It must be clean and free of lint buildup. Check the damper and make sure it opens fully and easily and is free of lint.

I know you said you have no elbows, but I have posted the pipe run lengths with and without elbows. Keep in mind this is with 4 inch rigid or semi rigid metal ducting.

Measure the length of your exhaust system and count the elbows. Use the chart below to see if your duct is too long. If it is too long, have the duct routed to another location that is within the venting guidelines.

0~90 degree elbows=65 ft of 4 inch rigid metal duct.
1~90 degree elbow=55 ft of 4 inch rigid metal duct.
2~90 degree elbows=47 ft """"""""
3~90 degree elbows=36 ft """"""""
4~90 degree elbows=28 ft """"""""

You should always use duct tape or metal tape on all joints, NEVER USE SCREWS, as screws capture lint inside the pipe.

One more note. Lots of people overlook the fact that fabric softeners can build up on the lint filter over time. This buildup can restrict the airflow through the filter reducing dryer efficiency and lengthening drying times. After removing lint, if the filter looks dark or dirty when held up to the light, follow these steps to clean:

Use hot soapy water and a stiff brush to clean
the filter.
Make sure the filter is completely dry before
reinstalling it and using the dryer.
NEVER operate the dryer with a wet lint filter.

Oct 29, 2014 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

I have a GE model # DCVH680EJOMS front end loading Dryer and it seems to take multiple cycles to get my clothes dry. I discovered that Water is collecting in the flexible exhaust tubing...not just a...


Hi and Welcome to FixYa. I am Kelly

You already have discovered the problem. Lint has built up in the vent / exhaust ducting. Most of the time the through the wall vent flapper gets lint build up on it outside the house and then as that restricts airflow you get condensation in the ducting. The condensation causes the lint to form a cake like paste inside the ducting. THOROUGHLY Clean out your vent ducting from the dryer connection all the way thru the outside wall and your dryer will be fine. If you need to replace the ducting please do so. Ducting is cheaper than the electricity you waste on clogged ducting. You proved your dryer will work correctly when you dried a load of clothes with the ducting removed.

Thanks for choosing FixYa

Kelly

Sep 27, 2010 | GE DCVH515EF Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Takes 4 or 5 cycles to dry clothes.


Most of the time this problem is attributed to a blocked or more precisely, a partially blocked dryer vent system. When a dryer vent is blocked it stops the air flow and the heat backs up into the dryer turning the heat sensors on and off prematurely taking longer for the clothes to dry. Over time this may cause the heat overload fuse to blow and you will have no heat at all.
First take a look at the dryers ducting between the dryer and the wall to make sure the vent duct (normally a flexible style) has not been crushed or kinked.
If the dryer duct to the wall is in good shape then in most cases there is a blockage some where between the wall where the ducting connects to the vent and where it exhausts outside.
The major cause of a blocked dryer duct occurs when the water in the clothes is heated to a high temperature and turned into steam, which is then exhausted out the back of the dryer to outside. As the steam cools on its journey and gets closer to the outside of the house, it tends to get cooler and turns back into water droplets. This is going to be the point where the dried lint, as it escapes past the lint filter, sticks to the newly formed water drops and starts a gradual chocking down of the 4" diameter vent to 3",2",1" and finally stops all flow of air.
Remember, the dryer is designed to exhaust so many cfm's and the more choked the vent the more heat is backed up into the dryer.
If you cannot access the dryer ducting, because it is in the wall or ceiling, to look for the obstruction, then look in the yellow pages or contact the local appliance repair service company and get the name for a good duct cleaning company.

Apr 08, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is not drying. Lint is not collecting on


There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust.

However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. With a clog comes condensation and longer dry times. The dryer will continue to run inefficiently and cause the heating circuits to work harder and overheat. This will eventually lead to a failure of the heating circuits. If you are seeing condensation inside the dryer, it is strongly recommended the you inspect and clean the dryer exhaust vent hose. You should repeat this a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not become clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Sep 07, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

The lint screen does not capture lint. The lint


To dispell a common myth. There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted through the dryer vent exhaust ducting along with the moisture from your clothing as it dries. If the exhaust vent remains unobstructed, all the air and lint will be blown out the end of the dryer vent exhaust. However, if the air meets any resistance from kinks, excessive bends, or sags, moisture will build up inside the dryer vent exhaust causing the lint to stick to the interior walls of the vent hose. Over time this lint builds up and forms a clog. It is strongly recommended to have the exhaust vent hose checked and/or cleaned a couple of times a year to ensure it remains obstruction free.

The most frequent causes of dryer vent clogs comes from the following:

1. Ducting that runs in an upward direction in homes that have an attic exhaust. This is a stupid design that gravity will always win. When the dryer shuts offf, anything left in the vent will fall down the ducting to the base of the wall and accumulate. Over time, this forms a clog.

2. Ducting that runs under the home in a crawl space. If not correctly hung from the rafters, the ducting will develop sags causing choke points where lint can accumulate. Leaving it on the ground is not the answer, either. This gives opportunity for rodents to possibly chew through it. This will cause leaks which exhausts warm moist air under your home resulting in mold and mildew.

3. Using plastic dryer vent hose. This type of hose is not recommended because it kinks easily and can get crushed, causing an obstruction where lint can clog. Rodents can also chew through it easily. Pushing the dryer up against the wall and crushing the hose is a common cause. Use the semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists crushing, kinks and rodent infestation.

4. Rodents. Mice love lint. If given the access to it, they will build inside the dryer vent hose which provides a nice warm place to live with lots of bedding material. Make sure you exhaust vent on the exterior of your home is about 12 inches from the ground.

5. Exhaust vent screens. I know there are many types of exhaust vents on the market that you can purchase that have screens on them to prevent birds and rodents from entering them. The screen can actually become and obstruction, though. The smaller the opening, the more resistance the blower fan meets and lint will clog at the end of the exhaust. If you chose to use a protected exhaust vent, the ones with louvers work better. You will still need to periodically check the ensure it does not becoe clogged.

6. Excessively long vent hose. The rule of thumb when it comes to dryer vent ducting is: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the BETTER. Excessively long dryer vent hoses will clog due to the fact that the blower fan is not able to push all the air and lint all the way to the exhaust.

7. Kinked, Excessively Bent, or Crushed vent hoses. If the vent has any choke points due to kinks, bends, or gets crushed behind the dryer, you will develop ponts where the exhaust vent will clog.

The following link may also help in providing some basic guidance on how to install dryer vent hose:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r389357-dryer_ducting_installation_tips

I know it may seem that I'm beating this point to death, but it is important to provide good air flow for your dryer. The number one cause of dryer failures and house fires comes from poorly maintained and poorly installed ventilation ducting.

If you have any questions, pleae let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Aug 19, 2009 | Whirlpool Duet 7.0 Cu. Ft. Super Capacity...

1 Answer

Whirlpool model # lgr7646ez3


Here are a list of causes that may contribute to this lack of sufficient drying.


CAUSE
• Lint screen is clogged with lint.
• Restricted air movement.
Exhaust vent or outside
exhaust hood is clogged with
lint.
• Exhaust vent is crushed or
kinked.
• One fuse is blown or circuit
breaker is tripped. The dryer
will appear to operate, but you
will not get any heat.
• Cycle Control knob or temperature
selector is set on air dry.
• Load not contacting the sensor
strips and automatic cycle
ending early.
• Fabric softener sheets blocking
exhaust grill.
• Dryer located in room with
temperature below 45ºF (7ºC).
• Large amount of moisture in
the load.
• Cold rinse water used.
• Load too large and bulky to
dry quickly.


Here are the solutions to combat the issues.


SOLUTION
• Clean lint screen.
• Run dryer for 5-10 minutes. Hold hand under
outside exhaust hood to check air movement. If you
do not feel air moving, clean exhaust system of lint
or replace exhaust vent with heavy metal or flexible
metal vent.
• Replace with heavy metal or flexible metal vent

• Replace fuse or reset breaker.
• Select the right cycle and temperature for the types
of garments being dried.
• Level dryer.
• Use only one softener sheet per load and only use
it once.
• Move dryer to a location with temperatures above
45ºF (7ºC).
• Expect longer dry times with items that hold more
moisture (cottons).
• Expect longer dry times.
• Separate load to tumble freely.

This will help you fix this problem. i suspect an exhaust obstruction.

Mar 11, 2009 | Whirlpool LGR7646E Dryer

1 Answer

Overheating dryer


blowing when the tube is off usually = dryer fan ok, and is a sign that the duct is blocked past that point,
most commonly there is a blockage in the vent hood, the screen that keeps bugs and rodents from gralling up the exhaust, is also very good for catching any lint that squeezes past the lint filter.
most exterior hoods can rmove the screen for cleaning
any flexible ducting is a likely ara as well, the corrugations make a lint trap
check also that the duct from the heater element into the drum is not dislocated or blocked

Oct 23, 2008 | Amana Dryers

1 Answer

I want to know how to remove the lint trap (not just the screen but the entire assembly) from a Maytag Performa PYET344AZW front loading electric dryer. The lint screen will not even properly slide back...


Besides drying clothes, dryers also remove lint. This fine, fuzzy material can cause trouble because it blocks dryer lint traps, clogs vents, and fills blowers. Lint can also gather around and in the tracks of the drum rollers, or in and under the pulleys and the drive belt. The result is poor clothes drying or -- sometimes -- no drying. To avoid lint problems, clean out the dryer's lint trap system every time you use the dryer.
To clean the lint screen, remove it from the unit. The screen may be located near or under the door sill, or in the top of the dryer near the control panel. It can usually be removed by pulling it up and out of its housing. Remove the accumulated lint to clear the screen; then replace the screen.
The exhaust vent also collects lint. Vent maintenance involves cleaning the lint from a screen in the dryer's vent exhaust collar and/or at the end of the exhaust vent where it sticks out through a basement window or through an exterior wall. To clean the screen, remove the clamp that holds the vent to the collar, or back out the screws that hold the vent to the collar, or pull the vent straight off an extended collar. Clean the screen thoroughly and replace it in the vent assembly.
To clean the vent itself, use a vent-cleaning brush (available at hardware stores) to pull out any lint deposits. Also check the vent run to make sure that the vent piping or tubing isn't loose at the joints, or -- in the case of flexible plastic venting -- isn't sagging between hanging brackets. Breaks or sags cause undue strain on the dryer's blower system, and can cause drying problems. If the vent pipe or tubing has become clogged with lint, remove the lint by pushing a garden hose or a drain-and-trap auger through the vent to a convenient joint. Disassemble the joint to remove the debris. With this procedure, it isn't necessary to disassemble the entire vent to find the blockage.You can head off problems before they become too serious by providing routine maintenance for your dryer's door gasket, thermostat, timer, and other frequently used parts. Let's discuss how to service these important components in the next section.  
how-to-repair-a-dryer-1.jpgTHANK U.. RATE IT...

Sep 11, 2008 | Dryers

2 Answers

CLOTHES DRYER (ELECTRIC) HAS HEAT AND TUMBLES BUT CLOTHES ARE NOT GETTING DRY.


DISCONNECT THE EXHAUST FROM THE BACK OF THE DRYER. RUN ONE LOAD OF LAUNDRY. IF THE LOAD DRIES O.K., THE EXHAUST DUCT IS RESTRICTED. CLEAN OUT THE DUCT WORK. IF IT IS FLEXIBLE MATERIAL, REPLACE WITH RIGID METAL DUCT WORK.

Apr 22, 2008 | Dryers

2 Answers

Dryer takes too long to dry


This complaint is most often caused by the dryer's vent being blocked with lint. Dryers need to be properly vented, otherwise the moisture in the air can't be properly carried away. Vents that go out the roof are particularly problematic-- the dryer may take far too long to dry clothes and the vent pipe may even drip water that can't be exhausted. Minimum size for a dryer's roof vent is 4 inches. If your dryer has chronically poor drying, if possible, have the vent moved to where it exits a house wall near the dryer. The vent should be made of 4-inch aluminum rigid duct and elbows or, where absolutely necessary, flexible metal (but not flexible thin foil). Do not use flexible plastic duct-- it restricts air flow and is combustible. The dryer should vent outside--never into a crawl space, wall, ceiling chimney, or other type of flue. The bottom of the exhaust hood should be located at least 12 inches above the ground. Here is what to do: 1) Check the lint trap and clean it. 2) Be sure the dryer isn't pushed so close to the wall that it pinches off the airflow through the vent's air duct hose. 3) Check the point where the air duct vents away from the house. Be sure plants, birds, or anything else hasn't blocked it. If the duct vents out the roof, it could easily be blocked with lint. 4) Disconnect the air duct hose from the back of the gas dryer and clean out built-up lint. Note: For safety, first turn off the gas to the dryer, then unplug the dryer; this means you will have to re-light the pilot light later if the dryer has one (read your owner?s manual for proper re-lighting techniques). 5) If necessary, clean out the ductwork from the dryer to the exterior wall where it vents; this may involve disconnecting sections. One trick that sometimes makes this job easier (but only if the dryer duct is fastened firmly at all connection points) is to blow lint and debris through the duct and out the exterior wall vent, using an electric leaf blower.

Jan 18, 2006 | AEG T57800 Electric Dryer

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