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Adjusting exposure in snow scenes - Canon Cameras

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You generally need to overexpose a stop or two. Without knowing the model of your Canon, I can't give you specific instructions. If your camera has an exposure compensation feature, you can use it. If not, you'll have to set the film speed lower by a stop or two.

Posted on Aug 24, 2016

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What should exposure compensation be set on


That depends on what you're taking a picture of. Normally, you'd want it on zero.

Use it if the exposure meter produces an exposure too light or too dark for the subject. The camera's meter is designed to render all scenes as a medium gray. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to render the scene as a medium gray. In this situation you want to use positive exposure compensation to render the scene brighter.

Conversely, if take a picture of a black cat sunning itself on a black car, the camera will again try to render the scene as a medium gray. In this case you want negative exposure compensation to darken the scene.

Jul 09, 2011 | Kodak EasyShare C143 Digital Camera

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CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN TO TO ME WHAT IS EV COMPENSATION AND HOW DOES IT WORK


EV compensation is "Exposure Value compensation". The camera contains an exposure meter which determines how much light is on the scene and sets the exposure appropriately. However, this meter does not know WHAT you're taking a picture of, nor does it know what effect you're going for. The best it can do is to assume you're taking a picture of an "average" scene and want it to be of "average" brightness. It does this by assuming the scene is "middle gray," halfway between black and white. Most of the time this works fine, because most scenes are, well, average.
However, this is not always the case. Suppose you're taking a picture of a white dog playing in the snow. Almost everything in the scene is bright white, but the camera doesn't know that. It tries to make the scene middle gray, and the result is that you get a gray dog playing in gray snow.
On the other hand, suppose you're taking a picture of a black cat sleeping on the hood of a black car. Here everything is black, but the camera doesn't know it. It tries to make an average scene, resulting in a gray cat sleeping on a gray car.
EV compensation allows you to override the camera's exposure setting. In the first example, you'd want to add two or three stops (positive EV compensation) to force the camera to render the dog and snow as white instead of gray. In the second example, you'd want to subtract a stop or two (negative EV compensation) to render the cat black instead of gray.
How much EV compensation is correct? Well, that depends on the scene. With a digital camera, you can look at the picture and see whether the dog looks white or the cat looks black. Film photographers take lots of shot, using various levels of EV compensation, so that one of them would come out right.

Mar 19, 2011 | DXG Technology DXG-505V Digital Camera

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Hello, I would like my pictures to have a white background. When I take the picture on a white background the background ends up looking gray. I am taking pictures of baby clothing and I want the clothing...


Exposure meters are designed on the premise that the scene is an average, middle gray, in brightness. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray dog playing in gray snow). If you take a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray cat sitting on gray ground).

If the white background is dominating the scene, the camera will reduce exposure to try to make the entire scene come out middle gray. The solution is to meter on something else. Move in close and fill the frame with the subject, press the AE-LOCK button, then move back, compose the picture, and take the shot. For full details, refer to the "Shooting with the exposure locked --- AE-LOCK" section in the manual (page 52 in my copy).

If you're taking a lot of pictures, you might want to switch to Manual mode and set the exposure accordingly.

Dec 29, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F717 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I take pictures of white puppies on the same table in the same room.. some of the lighting is fine, some dark could it be the sandisk..??


Most likely it's the camera. Almost all cameras are designed to meter the scene as a medium gray. If you photograph white puppies in the snow, the camera will try to make the whole picture come out a medium gray, leading to gray puppies in gray snow. If you photograph black puppies in a coal bin, the camera will again try to make the whole picture come out a medium gray, leading to gray puppies in gray coal.

For this reason most cameras provide some means of adjusting the exposure. Since you didn't specify the make and model of your camera, I can't tell you exactly how to do it. Please look in the manual under "Exposure Compensation."

Jul 02, 2010 | SanDisk ULTRA II 4GB Compact Flash Card...

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Exposure control options


The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are four scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

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SCENE Modes


The SCENE Modes allow you to rapidly and conveniently enable complex camera settings required in frequently encountered situations automatically. Such factors as ISO, f-stop, shutter speed, exposure compensation, flash mode and white balance are applied for optimum results in each of the ten SCENE Modes. The SCENE Modes in the C-5500 are: Landscape + Portrait Portrait Landscape Night Scene Sport Beach & Snow Fireworks Sunset Available Light Portrait Candle

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5500/C-55 Sports Zoom...

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Shooting modes


The Shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM (P)/AUTO Modes Used for general photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. In PROGRAM (P) the brightness (exposure compensation) can be adjusted. In AUTO mode you cannot use exposure compensation or panorama features. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the landscape This setting allows for both the foreground subject and background landscape to be in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Sports Suitable for capturing fast moving action without blurring. Even a fast moving object will appear to be stationary. Beach and Snow Suitable for taking photos at the beach or on snow covered mountains; situations where there would be vey bright conditions where the sun reflects off of sand or snow. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the Wide position and cannot be changed. Movie The movie mode enables you to take a Quicktime movie for either viewing on the LCD or on your computer. The movie will record as long as the shutter button is depressed and or until there is no storage space left on the memory in use. No sound is recorded.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-425 / C-170 Digital...

1 Answer

Why can't I access Shooting Menus?


The Shooting Menus allow the user to control many aspects of the operation of the digital camera. You can change image size and compression, exposure compensation, sharpening, etc. When using a "Scene Mode" (Fireworks, Museum, Beach/Snow, etc)the camera determines the best settings for the particular scene and the options are limited in the Shooting Menus. If the Shooting Menu contains fewer options than expected or you are unable to adjust a particular setting be sure that the camera is not set in a scene mode. Depending on the camera model you should use "A" or "M" mode for full control.

Aug 30, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 3500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why can't I access Shooting Menus?


The Shooting Menus allow the user to control many aspects of the operation of the digital camera. You can change image size and compression, exposure compensation, sharpening, etc. When using a "Scene Mode" (Fireworks, Museum, Beach/Snow, etc)the camera determines the best settings for the particular scene and the options are limited in the Shooting Menus. If the Shooting Menu contains fewer options than expected or you are unable to adjust a particular setting be sure that the camera is not set in a scene mode. Depending on the camera model you should use "A" or "M" mode for full control.

Aug 30, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 2500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

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