Question about Nikon D40x Digital Camera

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Problem with image resolution


I have a Nikon D40, and when I take a image, no matter in whatever image resolution and size, it shows up only half photos and for some photos is shows up clearly, when I transfer it to my machine, I mean certain photos shows up fine and certain photos only 50% or 25% of the photo is shown.
. It is so impertinant, kindly please help.

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Re: Problem with image resolution

do the image is is also decrease or u feel that image resulation is low by quality if u tell me more then may be i say u something more about it.

Posted on Nov 19, 2007

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How to make date show on photo with nikon d40

The date and time (and a lot more) are stored with every picture in its EXIF metadata. Any photo viewing/editing program should be able to display this data. To print this data, please consult the documentation for whatever program you're using to print your pictures. Depending on the program and printer you may print the date on the image, in the margins, or on the back.

Jun 29, 2014 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

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No preview image

Hi there:
You can view pictures in the folder when connected the camera at pc monitor? but cannot take pictures or movies... the LCD stays blank?
If this answer is yes, could be a problem with the CCD image sensor, if no, your LCD display go to bad and will need replacement.

Check this interesting article about bad CCDs.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

Feb 07, 2012 | Nikon Digital Cameras

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How slove the problem


Specifications Recommendations

The Nikon D60 is an inexpensive 10 MP DSLR that comes with an excellent 18-55mm VR lens for about $650 as of June 2008. It was a announced in January, 2008, and sold for about $750 with lens in February 2008.

The Nikon D60 is a replacement for the almost identical D40x.

Personally I prefer Nikon's least expensive D40 over the D60 or D40x. The D60, D40x and D40 are actually exactly the same cameras, differering only slightly in their internal electronics, but differing greatly in their prices.

The D60 is actually a D40 body with a few more card-clogging pixels, a VR lens and adaptive dynamic range, but a slower maximum shutter speed with flash.

The D60 is less sensitive to light then the D40 (its default ISO is only ISO 100 compared to the D40's default ISO of 200). Its less sensitive to light because the pixels have to be made smaller to cram more of them into the same-sized sensor. Smaller pixels collect fewer photons than larger pixels. Since the D60 is half as light sensitive, the D60 has to use twice as long a shutter speed or a larger aperture, which makes it more likely to make a blurry picture than the D40. OOPS!

Save your money and get the D40 instead. The D40's faster sync speed is invaluable for use with flash outdoors, and the extra light sensitivity in normal use will help make sharper pictures. These three cameras (D40, D40x, D60) otherwise, for most users, are identical. Compare them in person and you'll see. Megapixels don't matter.

(I detail the few fine points which are new in the D60 further below.)

I had my hands on a D60 back in January 2008. The D60 is an excellent camera, but for most of the people who will buy it, it's the same thing as the $300 less expensive D40. I'd suggest getting a D40 and putting the $300 towards more lenses and/or a bouncable flash.

In fact, the faster flash sync speed (the fastest shutter speed with flash) is more than twice as fast in the D40 (1/500 vs. 1/200), and along with the faster base ISO, the D40 is more likely to make sharper photos for most people, for hundreds of dollars less!

The only significant feature in the D60 over the D40x and D40 is adaptive dynamic range. The D60 does not have any of the other next-generation functionality of the D3 and D300.

The D60 is just a D40 with more pixels, but slower shutter speeds with flash outdoors and less basic light sensitivity due to the smaller pixels needed to jam more of them onto the same-sized sensor.

I make excellent 12 x 18" (30 x 50 cm) prints from my 6 MP D40; do you plan to print bigger? Really? The resolution makes no difference unless I'm printing at 20 x 30" (60 x 80 cm) or more.

Since the D60 costs $300 more than the D40, I'd much rather have a D40, 1/500 flash sync for better daylight fill-flash range, a minimum ISO of 200 and $300 left over to buy lenses and an external flash that I can bounce for better lighting. For instance, the D40, 55-200mm VR and SB-400 is a far better way to spend the same $750.

Sep 19, 2011 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

When I want to take a photo, the monitor is blank, rather than showing what I am pointing the camera at. Last time I used it, it was ok... what has gone wrong? Thanks

If the D40 monitor showed you the image while taking the picture, there was something seriously wrong with the camera, which now appears to have fixed itself.

The D40 works as SLRs have worked for half a century, giving you the image through the viewfinder. The LiveView capability, allowing you to use the LCD monitor like a point&shoot camera, is a relatively new development, which Nikon introduced with the D3 and D300 a year after the D40.

Dec 17, 2010 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

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Monitor screen can not appear photos before shooting

That's the way the D40 works. The monitor is for menus and picture review, not to show images before shooting. Nikon introduced the LiveView capablitily with the D3 and the D300, introduced after the D40. The D40 works as SLRs have worked for half a century, giving you the image through the viewfinder.

Nov 27, 2010 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

How do I set the resolution?

Press the info button on the back to bring up the shooting information screen. The second item from the top on the right column is the image size. Press the button to activate the settings, then use the multiselector to navigate to the desired setting. Press OK, use the multiselector to select the desired size, then OK to set it.

Your choices are Large (3008x2000), Medium (2256x1496), and Small (1504x1000).

Note that you cannot change the image size if you're shooting RAW. The image quality setting is the one just above the image size.

Oct 11, 2010 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Camera won't show the image on the screen when taking the pictures. I have to use the small view finder to take photos. No image on the display until the photo is taken. How do you sqitch it back to the...

You don't. The D40 works as SLRs have worked for half a century. Only more recent dSLRs (Nikon started with the D3 and D300) have the LiveView capability that lets you handle your dSLR as a point&shoot.

Jun 11, 2010 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

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Can't view pictures downloaded from Nikon D40


Mar 04, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

300 dpi

Shooting pictures in Fine quality will give you atleast 300 DPI resolution. Check your camera setup menu to see what quality you're shooting in, and adjust as necessary.
If you need to print 300dpi, this is done in whatever program you're using to output. In Photoshop, this is done by going to image>image size and changing Resolution to 300 (or whatever other resolution you want)

Apr 08, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

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