Question about Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

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Duct fan comes in, igniter lights, but no flame

I followed the start up procedures including lowering thermostat to lowest point, removing electrical service, turning the valve to the off position and venting air from gas lines.  Yet, the unit continues to fail start-up after the first to steps in the start-up trial.

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Remove the front panel. Tape the door switch to the closed position. If the thermostat is calling for heat the furnace should do the following: a light on the circuit board will flash and then the exhaust blower will start. A few seconds later (10-15) you should hear clicking at at the circuit board and an orange glow should be seen thru the small viewing port. A few seconds later the gas valve should open and the orange light will turn blue. If the blue flame only lasts a few seconds and then goes out, their may either be a blockage not allowing the flame to travel to all the burners and not allowing a flame sensor to sence flame, shutting down the unit. After a few cycles of not starting, the circuit board will flash a series of codes that you can read if you look on the back of the front cover. It will give you a starting point where we can research and come up witha more difinitive answer. Let us know what you find for codes.

Posted on Oct 26, 2007

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I have a carrier furnance model # 398AAV036060 serial # 0293A03686 it comes on for a few minutes the cuts off please help


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My York furnace sometimes doesn't completely ignite


A noisy inducer probably is headed for replacement.

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Jan 10, 2014 | Heating & Cooling

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Goodman furnace Model GDS80703AXBB -fan comes on then igniter light comes on, then burners turn on but shut off right away and wont stay lit. Now igniter light wont come on so burners not coming on at...


Sounds like either the flame sensor is not working.
The sequence for starting the furnace is:
1. extraction fan on
2. pressure sensor (for fan)
3. ignitor (spark or glow plug) comes on
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5. ignition of flame
6. flame sensor (or temperature sensor)
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It is most likely that the flame sensor is dirty or gone,
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Sep 10, 2017 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I have a Vulcan Ultra 21E ceiling ducted unit The LED flashing fault is no 8 which is a gas interruption. The unit fan runs, ignition starts full flame and gas flows for about 2 secs then shuts down The...


Just been thru a similar problem with my Climate Technologies Vulcan High Efficiency Ducted Gas heater which in this case is installed under the house. This heater is about 7 years old and I have previously (2 years back) refurbished the controller by replacing the main power supply electrolytic filter capacitors.

I also had a communication problem with the Touch pad Thermostat which in the end required replacing the entire touch pad as one of it's voltage regulators had gone intermittent (Touch pads are available on E-Bay). To operate the heater while the touch pad was out of commission I installed a manual switch between the heat contacts on the heater controller. Closing the switch causes the heater to permanently run if it has no thermostat. Once communication with the touch panel was restored we were able to try and find the intermittent heater fault.

Again I have been getting Fault Code 08 "Gas Interruption" however the heater was lighting OK and then going out after about a minute or so. In the end I found 2 distinct heater faults.

Fault 1 was the flame sensor where the weld between the wire and flame probe rod had broken but it was still touching. This meant it was sensing Flame OK and then later would go open with expansion as the temperature rose. I fixed this by replacing the Flame Probe with a new one sourced from Reece HVAC.

At this point I celebrated thinking it was fixed!

Fault 2 after the flame sensor issue was cleared the fault still persisted but slightly less often.
The heater was cycling 3 times to get going and then locking out, requiring a reset from the touch thermostat or heater controller board. Sometimes the heater would achieve a onging burn for a long period, and other times just locking out after 3 tries.

Careful observation of the flame, through the observation holes after it lit, showed correct flame sensing but as soon as the nominal 65C duct temperature was reached the combustion fan (modulates) throttles back too far and the flame goes out, the flame sensor switches off and gas valve is then closed. The pressure differential across the burner manafold controls the Gas flow rate so if the combustion fan goes too slow the flame goes out due to lack of gas.

On the control board there is a potentiometer marked "MIN GAS RATE" this needs to be tweaked clockwise until the burner remains lit when the nominal 60-65C duct temperature is reached. Don't turn it up too far or the heater may not throttle back enough and end up going out on overheat.

Once a stable flame is achieved when throttled, try the heater in the economy mode which uses a lower recirculating fan speed and check the flame still remains lit. My problem was most obvious in the Econ mode.

Hope this helps someone else - It took me over a year to solve this one. NeilP

Aug 21, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

It was first shutting on ad off strangely then it won't start up now.


On a call for heat, the 24 volt thermostat sends a signal to the control module. The control module will indicate a call for heat with a light on the control either blinking or remain solid depending upon model. The inducer (exhaust) blower will purge all gasses from the furnace and pressurize a pressure switch. Once the pressure switch tells the module to continue, the electronic ignition will energize and send 120 volts to the igniter. The igniter will glow and you will be able to see it if viewed thru the small inspection port. Once the igniter gets hot enough, it sends a signal to the module opening up the gas valve (24 volts). Either a pilot will come on or the burner tube will ignite then spread the flame to all burners. Lastly a safety sensor will be looking for a certain temperature within a few seconds and the furnace will continue to operate and the room air blower will turn on in a minute or two.

What could go wrong? The unit will not run if there is no signal from the thermostat (bad thermostat or broken wire), the control module does not sense a signal from the thermostat (bad control), the inducer does not energize (bad motor), the pressure switch does not close (blocked vent piping, bad switch, plugged condensate hose), the igniter does not energize (bad control, bad igniter), the gas valve does not open or there is no gas (bad gas valve, broken wire, no gas), the pilot does not light (dirty pilot), the burner does not light (bad burner, plugged orifice, not enough combustion air), the flame does not spread to each burner (bad flame spreader, dirty flame spreader, more bad burners), the flame safety sensor does not detect flame (dirty or bad flame spreader, bad flame sensor, broken wire, bad control), or the room air blower does not energize (bad fan motor, bad control).

This unit has a built-in diagnostic light that will blink a code when a problem occurs. Look thru a small viewing port on the lower panel and count the number of blinks. Then remove the door panels and look for a wiring diagram pasted on one of them. On it, there will be a diagnostic chart that will give you a starting point where to look for the problem. Good luck!

Mar 11, 2010 | Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

1 Answer

Furnace won't start up .. I've changed the filter and tripped the little switches but nope


What error code is flashing on the control board? If you open the panel that triggers the door switch, you will erase the code. Look for a small viewing port in the lower panel. Once you get the code, look on the wiring diagram glued to the inside of a panel for a diagnostic chart. It will give you a starting point.

On a call for heat, the 24 volt thermostat sends a signal to the control module. The control module will indicate a call for heat with a light on the control either blinking or remain solid depending upon model. The inducer (exhaust) blower will purge all gasses from the furnace and pressurize a pressure switch. Once the pressure switch tells the module to continue, the electronic ignition will energize and send 120 volts to the igniter. The igniter will glow and you will be able to see it if viewed thru the small inspection port. Once the igniter gets hot enough, it sends a signal to the module opening up the gas valve (24 volts). Either a pilot will come on or the burner tube will ignite then spread the flame to all burners. Lastly a safety sensor will be looking for a certain temperature within a few seconds and the furnace will continue to operate and the room air blower will turn on in a minute or two.

What could go wrong? The unit will not run if there is no signal from the thermostat (bad thermostat or broken wire), the control module does not sense a signal from the thermostat (bad control), the inducer does not energize (bad motor), the pressure switch does not close (blocked vent piping, bad switch, plugged condensate hose), the igniter does not energize (bad control, bad igniter), the gas valve does not open or there is no gas (bad gas valve, broken wire, no gas), the pilot does not light (dirty pilot), the burner does not light (bad burner, plugged orifice, not enough combustion air), the flame does not spread to each burner (bad flame spreader, dirty flame spreader, more bad burners), the flame safety sensor does not detect flame (dirty or bad flame spreader, bad flame sensor, broken wire, bad control), or the room air blower does not energize (bad fan motor, bad control).

Jan 26, 2010 | Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

2 Answers

My heater blows cold air. any ideas?


Your unit has a diagnostic light on the circuit board. You need to look thru a small viewing port to see it. Once you count the number of b links, remove the lower panel and look at the wiring diagram for an error code chart. Then read the following to give you some ideas what to do.

On a call for heat, the 24 volt thermostat sends a signal to the control module. The control module will indicate a call for heat with a light on the control either blinking or remain solid depending upon model. The inducer (exhaust) blower will purge all gasses from the furnace and pressurize a pressure switch. Once the pressure switch tells the module to continue, the electronic ignition will energize and send 120 volts to the igniter. The igniter will glow and you will be able to see it if viewed thru the small inspection port. Once the igniter gets hot enough, it sends a signal to the module opening up the gas valve (24 volts). Either a pilot will come on or the burner tube will ignite then spread the flame to all burners. Lastly a safety sensor will be looking for a certain temperature within a few seconds and the furnace will continue to operate and the room air blower will turn on in a minute or two.

What could go wrong? The unit will not run if there is no signal from the thermostat (bad thermostat or broken wire), the control module does not sense a signal from the thermostat (bad control), the inducer does not energize (bad motor), the pressure switch does not close (blocked vent piping, bad switch, plugged condensate hose), the igniter does not energize (bad control, bad igniter), the gas valve does not open or there is no gas (bad gas valve, broken wire, no gas), the pilot does not light (dirty pilot), the burner does not light (bad burner, plugged orifice, not enough combustion air), the flame does not spread to each burner (bad flame spreader, dirty flame spreader, more bad burners), the flame safety sensor does not detect flame (dirty or bad flame spreader, bad flame sensor, broken wire, bad control), or the room air blower does not energize (bad fan motor, bad control).

Dec 01, 2009 | Goodman GMS90703BXA Heater

1 Answer

Furnace has new board, and ignitor but still not producing heat what could be the problem


If the furnace is less than 10 years old you will have a diagnostic light that will blink a code. You will need to find the viewing port to see how many times the light blinks and then look at the wiring diagram on the reverse of the front panel for a starting point. If you first remove the panel, it will erase the code so you must look thru the viewing port. Once you get the code read the following:

On a call for heat, the 24 volt thermostat sends a signal to the control module. The control module will indicate a call for heat with a light on the control either blinking or remain solid depending upon model. The inducer (exhaust) blower will purge all gasses from the furnace and pressurize a pressure switch. Once the pressure switch tells the module to continue, the electronic ignition will energize and send 120 volts to the igniter. The igniter will glow and you will be able to see it if viewed thru the small inspection port. Once the igniter gets hot enough, it sends a signal to the module opening up the gas valve (24 volts). Either a pilot will come on or the burner tube will ignite then spread the flame to all burners. Lastly a safety sensor will be looking for a certain temperature within a few seconds and the furnace will continue to operate and the room air blower will turn on in a minute or two.

What could go wrong? The unit will not run if there is no signal from the thermostat (bad thermostat or broken wire), the control module does not sense a signal from the thermostat (bad control), the inducer does not energize (bad motor), the pressure switch does not close (blocked vent piping, bad switch, plugged condensate hose), the igniter does not energize (bad control, bad igniter), the gas valve does not open or there is no gas (bad gas valve, broken wire, no gas), the pilot does not light (dirty pilot), the burner does not light (bad burner, plugged orifice, not enough combustion air), the flame does not spread to each burner (bad flame spreader, dirty flame spreader, more bad burners), the flame safety sensor does not detect flame (dirty or bad flame spreader, bad flame sensor, broken wire, bad control), or the room air blower does not energize (bad fan motor, bad control).

Nov 28, 2009 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Just quit drying clothes


If it does not dry them all then the element is a good guess or the thermostat.

If it dries them but not all the way check that the moisture sensor is not turned down too far.

The following should help you.

How to Repair Heating Elements A dryer sometimes won't heat or heats too slowly because of a variety of reasons. By following the guidelines below, you can inspect the heating elements on a gas or electric dryer to pinpoint the source of the problem.

Troubleshooting the Gas Heater

In a gas dryer, heat is provided by a gas heater that is controlled by an air shutter. The gas heater is generally the source of no-heat or drying problems. You can often correct such problems by adjusting the air shutter on the gas burner, which is located along the bottom of the dryer.

To adjust the shutter, take out the screws and remove the panel that covers the gas flame. Turn on the dryer so the flame is burning. If the flame has a deep blue color and you hear air whistling around the burner, the air/gas mixture is receiving too much air. If the flame has a yellow tip, the mixture is not receiving enough air. Turn the thumbscrew or loosen the two screws slightly to increase or decrease the flow of air to the burner. Keep turning until the flame is a light blue color, without any yellow, and the whistling stops.

Gas dryers use an electric ignition device rather than a pilot light to light the gas heater: An element becomes hot and glows like the filament in a lightbulb. Electric ignition systems are always sealed; you can't adjust or repair them. If an electric ignition device fails, call a professional service person for replacement.
how-to-repair-a-dryer-2.jpg
©2006 Publications International, Ltd.
In a gas dryer, heat is provided by a gas heater, controlled by an air shutter.
Electric dryers have self-contained electric heating elements.

Servicing the Electric Heating Elements

Electric heating elements, found in electric dryers, are self-contained units located in the back of the dryer. A defective heating element is frequently the source of no-heat or drying problems. Remove the back service panel to gain access to the elements.

The heating elements are located inside the heater ducts. If you think a heating element is faulty, test it with a volt-ohm-milliammeter (VOM) set to the RX1 scale. Disconnect the leads from the power terminals and clip one probe of the VOM to each terminal. The meter should read about 12 ohms. If the reading is higher than 20 ohms, the heater is faulty and should be replaced. Replace a faulty heater with a new one of the same type and electrical rating. A heater connected to a 115-volt line usually has an 8.4-ohm resistance; a heater connected to a 220-volt line usually has 11 ohms resistance.

The heater may also malfunction because it's grounded. To test for this, set the VOM to the RX1 scale and remove the leads to the heater. Clip one probe of the VOM to a heater terminal and touch the other probe to the heater housing. The meter needle should jump to a fairly high reading. If the needle flicks back and forth at a low reading, the heater is probably grounded and should be replaced. Here's how to replace the heater:

Step 1: Remove the back of the dryer. If necessary, also remove the cabinet top.

Step 2: Disconnect the leads and remove the screws that hold the duct in position. Then lift the entire heater unit out of the dryer.

Step 3: Remove the screws that hold the heating element in the duct.

Step 4: Slip the new heating element into the heating duct the same way the old one came out. Be careful not to damage the resistance coils. Replace the screws that hold the heating element in the duct, reconnect the leads, and screw the unit back into position.

Servicing the Fan

The most common dryer fan problem is lint clogging the air passages through the heater and through the dryer drum. To clear a clogged air passage, remove the back service panel of the dryer and back out the screws holding the air duct in place. Then reach into the duct and remove all the lint and dirt possible. Reassemble the parts.

Also inspect the fan for a loose screw connection where the motor shaft is set on the dryer's drum. Remove the back service panel, tighten the screw, and replace the panel.

May 09, 2009 | Maytag Neptune MDE5500AY Electric Dryer

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