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Bicycle chain skips a cog

When pedaling the bicycle under force (as in going up a hill) the chain skips over a cog on the rear gear.

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  • Anonymous Mar 13, 2014

    CAN YOU SHOW ME IMAGES OF PEDAL/ARMS/SPROCKET LOOK LIKE ON A DIAMONDBACK CRUISER BICYCLE?

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You may have a bent or worn gear on the rear. Take a good luck at the teeth on your gears -- if any are bent or worn down, replace the gear set. Also, does your derailleur need adjusting? THis will produce a chattering or scraping noise in soem gears. If it's not centering the chain over the gear in each gear, the sideways force can pull it off for a moment.

Posted on Jun 04, 2009

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3 Answers

What causes a bike to be hard to pedel?


Many things. Usually too high a gear. The smaller the cog at the rear wheel the harder it is to get going, but when you do, it is the fastest speed. Move to the largest cog and pedalling will be very easy and is great for going up hills.

Apart from that

Binding brakes, spin the wheels and see how it feels.

Binding pedals, spin them by hand.

Binding centre crank, remove the chain and turn the pedals and crank.

Oct 13, 2016 | Cycling

1 Answer

Nishiki bravo bicycle will not engage gears when pedalling


has the cog seperated or snapped off the wheel as in can you freeturn the wheel and make the cog go around or does the wheel spin but the cog doesnt move,
if so your up for a new rear wheel/cog

Jan 28, 2013 | Cycling

2 Answers

My shimano ultegra left shifter is super stiff/hard to push in; what is going on?


Try flushing out the shifter(s) with WD-40, use plenty. The next step will be replacing the shift cables and cable housings.
  • Take the bicycle in an area free of cars and obstacles, such as an open parking lot. Concentration is required when learning to use Ultegra shifters or any other type of bicycle shifter.
  • 2 Mount the bicycle and rest both hands on the proper Ultegra hand control. The left-hand control operates the front derailleur. The right-hand control operates the rear derailleur.
  • 3 Start pedaling, smoothly and evenly. While pedaling is crucial to propelling the bicycle forward, it is also necessary when shifting the derailleur. Pedaling forces the chain to rotate. The chain must rotate before it can transfer to another gear.
  • 4 Push the outside right Shimano Ultegra lever in toward the bicycle. The rear derailleur will shift the chain to a smaller rear gear.
  • 5 Push the inside right Shimano Ultegra lever in toward the bicycle. The rear derailleur will shift the chain to a larger rear gear.
Rear Ultegra Derailleur Control
  • 1 Push the outside left Shimano Ultegra lever in toward the bicycle. The front derailleur will shift the chain to larger front gear.
  • 2 Push the inside left Shimano Ultegra lever in toward the bicycle. The front derailleur will shift the chain to a smaller front gear.
  • 3 Use the front and rear Ultregra hand controls interchangeably. For small changes in gearing, using the rear control. For larger changes, choose the front control. A smaller gear causes the bicycle to travel a shorter distance per pedal stroke but also requires less energy to use. A larger gear requires greater effort but in turn causes the bicycle to travel farther per pedal stroke.

Oct 25, 2011 | Cycling

1 Answer

I'm new to multi gear bikes..whats the reason for the 6 gear positions on the right and 3 gear positions on the left hand side


Bicycles have two sets of gears (front and back). The 6 position control slides the chain between the 6 sprockets (cogs) on the back. The 3 gears are for the front set of cogs. Between the two sets of sprockets, you get 18 (theoretical) different rates of chain movement per turn of the pedals. In fact some of the settings overlap. (However some of these should not be used. Do not use the settings that pull the chain to the furthest inside of one derailleur and the furthest outside of the other. This diagonal between the biggest and biggest sprockets (or smallest to smallest) puts extra strain on the chain.) The back derailleur is in the lowest gear when on the biggest sprocker. The front low gear is on the smallest cog. The highest gear possible is on the smallest rear cog and the largest front cog.

By planning the shifts in gears, you can maintain the same speed and cadence (rate of pedalling) on different terrains. (For going up a hill, use a lower gear than on flat terrain. However don't go to low or the bike may not balance well.) To shift through a large range of gears, you must be pedalling and then move the rear derailleur control followed by the front derailleur then the back again. (For faster shifts to a low speed, you can shift the front derailleur first but that can stress the system.)

For a guide to using the gears: http://www.southcoastbikes.co.uk/articles.asp?article=Gears .

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

May 14, 2011 | Huffy Cycling

1 Answer

Hi, I have recently installed a new X9 derailleur in accordance with the manufactures' instructions. I have also relpaced the rear hanger. The gears shift ok, however, when in gear, especially the...


Did you also replace the chain or any of the cogs? Skipping is a common condition when you replace one and not the other. Or if the cogs and chain are well worn, it may simply be time to replace them. You can usually do fine without replacing the gear-rings (that is, the cogs by the pedals)

Nov 10, 2010 | Sram X9 Mountain Bike Rear Derailleur

1 Answer

I'm a 60 year old female. Only just learning to ride a bike. Husband been riding for 60 years and doesn't seem to understand my problem! I have a bike with SI-6KT0B gears. I understand the principles of...


Congratulations on learning to ride the bike. I use the rear gears mainly i.e. the gears on the right hand side. Each rear gear makes a little difference so it makes it a little easier to go uphill. (When the chain is on the back smallest cog wheel it's hardest to pedal and easiest on the largest. The reverse is true of the front cog wheels) If you come to a very steep hill you should use the front gears i.e. the lever on the left hand side. This makes a bigger difference to the effort needed to climb a hill. When you have put the front gear into the easiest position, (on the smallest cog wheel) you can still use your rear gears to make it easier still. For going on flat ground or downhill most people keep both sets of gears on the hardest gear. (The front gears on the largest cog wheel and the rear one on the smallest) However there's no rule that says you have to. Use the one that feels you're using just enough energy to turn the pedals and in time you won't have to even think about the gears. I hope this helps.

Aug 09, 2010 | Cycling

2 Answers

I have been given a bike with Shimano gears.Left hand 123,Righthand 1234567.Can you give me a normal setting to start riding using them and getting used to them.


I would start out with the left gear set to 2 and the right shifter set to 4 or 5. If that's too difficult, then shift the left gear to 1.

Most people really don't shift gears on bikes much and that's a shame because it can make cycling much easier. I would advise you to take some time to learn about shifting as it will make riding much easier, especially if there are any hills around.

The left hand shifter is for the 3 large gears in between your pedals. This shifter produces the biggest change in effort. As a general rule, use the first one for uphills, the middle for flats and the last one for downhills. Of course this is all relative to your conditioning. You should attempt to maintain a pedaling cadence of 75-90 (in general) so that you always feel like the pedals are spinning and that you are not grinding it out. The right hand shifter is for the 7 gears on the rear of the bike and are used for smaller changes. Here is a link that will provide more detailed info on this subject. Happy cycling!

http://coachlevi.com/cycling/complete-beginner-guide-to-bicycle-gears-shifting/

Mar 03, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

I need to know how to place the chain back on the gears


shift onto your smallest cog on the rear and shift to your biggest cog at the front then place part of the chain onto the small cog at the back and then do the same with the big cog at the front then simply pedal forwards and the chain should go back on by itself

Aug 03, 2009 | Huffy Cycling

1 Answer

Front cog does not rotate when pedaled


You will have to remove the rear wheel and take it in to a bicycle shop and have the rear cog replaced. The freewheel part inside it has likely broken and will only rotate in both directions. It should rotate to back pedal and then catch as you pedal forward.

Apr 08, 2009 | Freestyle Cycling

1 Answer

New kmc 10speed chain skipping over a newer durace cassette


If you replaced the chain yourself , you may have left it too long. With the chain on the biggest cog on the rear and the biggest cog on the front , pull the two ends of the chain together and see where they will link up. Leave another two links in the chain and it should be the correct length. You may also have the wrong chain for the bike. Also carefully check each tooth on each cog front and back for wear. Also check the idler wheels in your rear derailleur.

Mar 29, 2009 | Cycling

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