Question about Nintendo Super Scope 6 for Super

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SNES scope! only registers once on the first target & not 2nd

Problems with my SNES scope! When powered on, asks me to set the aim and then shows the first target. The scope fires when i pess the button and hits the first target however when it asks me to confirm/adjust my aim by shooting at the second target when i press fire nothing happens no matter how many times i press fire??
Tried swapping the port connections from 1 to 2 and back again but nothing registers on the second target......any suggestions?

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SOURCE: Hi,

make sure you're aiming at the center of the screen during adjust aim. also, try rapidly tapping the fire button.

Posted on Jun 30, 2010

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Do you have a low power eyepiece inserted at the viewing end?
Have you aimed the telescope at the moon as a basic test of
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If your telescope is not properly aimed at the target (a star or a planet, or other object in the night sky) then you will see nothing.
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Have nintendo scope 6 and able to do first screen but when it goes to test aim screen nothing happens just remains on screen


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How do i sight this scope in, say for 100 yds what are all the sighting knobs for...?


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How to use the BDC on my rifle scope



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  2. Step 2 Determine the trajectory of the specific cartridge you have selected. There are several ways to do this. Ammo manufacturers publish trajectory and wind drift information. There are web based ballistic calculators like http://www.biggameinfo.com/BalCalc.aspx which will tell you how much your bullet drops at known distances.
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I got this from a website, hope it helps.

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Make your adjustments, using the grid on the target to tell you how many inches it needs to move, and shoot the target again to confirm the adjustment is correct. It's pretty standard to shoot at least a three shot group to ensure the bullets are reasonably close to each other.

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you look through that to see what the telescope is aimed at, just like what a sniper does before he pulls the trigger.

put in the lowest power eyepiece you have in the telescope, the one with a high number on it.

it's a good idea to align the 'finder' with the telescope during the day time--it's much easier.

if your telescope and finder scope aren't aligned properly, aiming your telescope at any target will be off and you'll just get frustrated.
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always use the lowest eyepiece first, then work your way to higher magnification, if you want to get a closer look at your target.

use lowest power eyepiece in telescope--> look through finder scope -->focus the image--> switch to higher power of eyepiece for a closer look at your target.

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1 Answer

SUPER SCOPE SNES


Super Scopes are NOTORIOUS for breaking down, losing calibration and whatnot.

As of such, there are no listed ways of fixing a super scope. You'll just have to buy a new one.

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