Question about Frigidaire GLER642A Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Back panel of dryer gets really hot.

First, the dryer was running, but there was no heat. I found that one of the cords within the power cord was burnt up and actually severed. (sorry for my discription...not real technically savvy) I replaced the whole power cord which solved that problem. However, when I tested the dryer out, i noticed that the top part of the back got really hot. I also noticed that that section of the back panel was slightly discolored (light brown). So I took the dryer apart and got to the heating element and found that part of the coil was free of the bracket holding it in place. I reattached the coil to the bracket, cleaned the entire dryer of lint, and put it back together. When I tested it this time, the back was still getting pretty hot. Any ideas??? Is this normal? Any advice as to how I should approach this. Thanks for your help.

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Frigidaire Master
  • 8,220 Answers

If it was me I would replace the control thermistat mounted on the blower housing.

Posted on Jun 09, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Dryer get hot, shuts off, and will restart once cooled off. How to wire in a four wire cord to the dryer?


If this is an ELECTRIC dryer and it runs, but does NOT produce heat/or shuts off, you may have a potential clog in the exhaust ventilation causing the dryer to overheat. The following two links can give you advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3574266-thorough_dryer_advice


IMPORTANT: Your problem may or may not be related to a heating element problem as there are numerous factors that can cause a dryer not to heat. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat and internal temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

To verify if you have your appliance power cord is installed correctly, refer to the following link:


http://www.fixya.com/support/r3575913-installing_a_220_vac_appliance_cord


Once you have verified your power cord installation, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits will either be located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand, or under the dryer drum on the right hand side. Usually, an easy way to determine is by the location of the lint screen filter. If the filter is on top of the dryer, the heating circuits are in the back of the dryer. If the lint screen is in the door, the heating circuits are located under the dryer drum.

On a Whirlpool Duet or Kenmore Elite model, the heating circuits are located inside the dryer under the dryer drum on the right hand side. You will need to remove the lower toe panel under the door to access. The toe panel comes off by locating and removing the screws under the bottom front edge of the panel. The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals (all the way towards the back of the dryer cabinet). The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) may be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify any parts you may need. The heating components are usually listed under the "Bulkhead" section.


If you have any questions, please post back and let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.


NOTES:
If your model number is not listed on some of the websites, use the part numbers from the Sears website and use that as your search criteria. Some model numbers will not reference on some sites, but the part numbers will.

Dec 10, 2010 | Kenmore 400 6942 Dryer

1 Answer

My dryer will not heat. was working fine but i moved and had to rewire a new cord on then when complete it will turn on but no heat. Is there a chance the thermal fuse needs replaced?


Verify your voltage at the wall receptacle before assuming you have a dryer problem. You should be reading 220-240VAC across the two HOT (left and right) terminals. If the voltage is not correct, you may have a breaker tripped somewhere. Most homes utilize a single dedicated 220VAC breaker for the dryer circuit. However, some older homes, may use two 120VAC breakers. So, if you are missing half your voltage, you may have a breaker tripped, or a bad receptacle.<br /> <br /> If the voltage IS correct, you may not have your power cord installed correctly. Since you mentioned you changed the power cord, you may want to go back and verify how you have it installed. The following link explains how to properly install an appliance cord to your dryer:<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.fixya.com/support/r3575913-installing_a_220_vac_appliance_cord">http://www.fixya.com/support/r3575913-installing_a_220_vac_appliance_cord</a><br /> <br /> <br /> Make sure you have the wires correctly terminated at the terminal block in the back of the dryer.<br /> <br /> <br /> If the power cord is installed correctly, and the voltage at the receptacle is correct, UNPLUG the dryer and check the continuity of the power cord. Perform a resistance check from end to end to ensure the cord isn't broken.<br /> <br /> NOTE: The reason a dryer will still run with half the input voltage, but won't heat, is because the drive motor only uses 110-120VAC to run. This voltage is tapped off the source voltage. The heating circuits, however, require the full 220 service to work.<br /> <br /> If you have any questions about these procedues, please post back with your MODEL NUMBER and let me know. I hope you find this helpful.

Aug 24, 2010 | Whirlpool Dryers

1 Answer

DRYER WIILL NOT HEAT


If this is an ELECTRIC dryer, If your dryer runs, but does NOT heat, any one of the following could be causing your problem:

1. Heating Element
2. Thermal Cut-Out (TCO)
3. Hi-Limit Thermostat
4. Improper input line voltage
5. Defective power cord. The following link explains how to troubleshoot and diagnose a no heat problem on an electric dryer:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits are located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand. Just remove the back panel of the dryer for access.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed also have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify the parts you need.

NOTE: In many cases the problem is NOT the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

Mar 27, 2010 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer won't heat up, runs fine , no heat


If your dryer runs, but does NOT heat, you more than likely have a problem in the heating circuits. Any one of the following are the common causes of this problem:

1. Heating Element
2. Thermal Cut-Out (TCO)
3. Hi-Limit Thermostat
4. Improper input line voltage
5. Defective power cord.

The following link gives some advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits are located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand. Just remove the back panel of the dryer for access.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed also have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify the parts you need.

NOTE: In many cases the problem is NOT the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back with your complete MODEL NUMBER and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

Mar 18, 2010 | Roper Dryers

1 Answer

It blows air but it is cold it does not get hot had thermail limi


If your dryer runs, but does NOT heat, you have a problem in the heating circuits. Any one of the following could be causing your problem:

1. Heating Element
2. Thermal Cut-Out (TCO)
3. Hi-Limit Thermostat
4. Improper input line voltage
5. Defective power cord.

The following link gives some advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits are located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand. Just remove the back panel of the dryer for access.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed also have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify the parts you need.

NOTE: In many cases the problem is NOT the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back with your complete MODEL NUMBER and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

NOTE: The door switch is a separate issue. You are right in your assumption that the switch is bad and needs to be replaced. However, a switch that stays on would normally cause the dryer to, not only run, but continue to heat.

Mar 18, 2010 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

My friend has dryer #LER4634JQ1,has had problems with power to the home,electician states one side of electric panel not getting current.Dryer has power,tumbles but won't heat,heating element tested OK....


Yes, an electric dryer requires 220VAC in order to heat.

I would recommend you begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). IMPORTANT: If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good at the terminal block with the dryer plugged in, you have an internal electrical problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord. Replacement power cords can be purchased at any hardware store for about $20.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, which is tapped off the input voltage. The heating circuits require the full 220-240VAC in order to work. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer will run, but won't heat.

Perform these steps and post back and let me know if you need further assistance. I hope this helps you.

Mar 11, 2010 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Kenmore electric dryer, model 96589210 - How do I get to the heating element to replace it? Dryer runs but no heat. Vent seems to be ok, power breaker seems to be ok.


Have you confirmed the heating element is bad? There's more to the dryer heating circuits that can cause a no heat problem besides the heating element.

If your dryer runs, but does not heat, the following link explains how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits will be located under the dryer drum on the right hand side.

To access the heating circuits, you will need to UNPLUG the dryer and remove the lower toe panel under the door by inserting a putty knife in the seam on the top of the tow panel, about 2 inches in from each side. This releases the retaining clips that hold the panel in place. You should be able to view the heating circuits on the right hand side under the drum.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare.

NOTE: Your model number is "110.96589210". Use this for your search criteria. Sears has some excellent exploded view diagrams to assist you in locating and properly identifying the parts I have described.

If you need further assistance, please post back with your complete model number (located on a nameplate around the door opening) and let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Feb 22, 2010 | Dryers

2 Answers

We have cleaned out all the vents and reset the


This site has been really helpful and has alot of information on solving problems with Dryers and other appliances. Hope this helps.

www.acmehowto.com/howto/appliance/appliance.php

Dec 29, 2009 | Whirlpool GEW9250 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Whirpool LER4634JQ1 runs but no heat checked the vent it is fine ...no lint build up in either the dryer or the vent


The following link explains how to troubleshoot a dryer no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r630242-dryer_runs_but_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer will exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuit can be accessed by simply removing the back panel of the dryer. The heating circuits will be located on the right hand side. The Heating Element is located inside the heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals. If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace both components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set (part number AP3094244). Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace. The heating element part number is AP3094254. All these parts can be found at appliancepartspros.com.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Aug 02, 2009 | Dryers

2 Answers

How do you install a 3 prong power supply cord to a GE Dryer?


DO NOT CHANGE THE POWER SUPPLY CORD.
you can't change the power supply cord.
the cord came with the dryer is 240v. the three prong is 120v. the dryer will burn up. if you change the power cord without changing the regulator , motor, and the heating element.
you need to get a electrician to run a 240v double breaker from the panel to the dryer.

Apr 23, 2009 | GE DVLR223 Dryers

Not finding what you are looking for?
Frigidaire GLER642A Electric Dryer Logo

Related Topics:

275 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Frigidaire Dryers Experts

Dan Webster
Dan Webster

Level 3 Expert

8220 Answers

Tim Whalen

Level 3 Expert

3074 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

78267 Answers

Are you a Frigidaire Dryer Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...