Question about Car Audio & Video

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Clarion arx9170 Hello, I have this old car stereo unit tape deck/equalizer/spectrum analyzer (from 1995 or so) in my car & the backlights are not working for the main display (the button backlights are fine). I took the display unit apart, there are 4 small bulbs (two on each side of the LCD main display), and none of them appear to be burned out (i.e., the filaments are intact and none are blackened), but they are not lighting up when attached to the main unit. Any suggestions? Thanks for any help...

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  • 2,045 Answers

If you have an ohm-meter check those bulbs. If not just replace them, but, before, check fuses (if there're any)

Posted on May 02, 2017

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: NAD 712 Stereo Receiver display

http://www.bulbdirect.com/ who's your mommy? ;]

Posted on Feb 01, 2006

techman
  • 3130 Answers

SOURCE: No radio

The front end is bad on this reicever. Your going to need special equipment to trouble shoot this problem, as Its all RF. It is most likly not worth repairing as a shop will most likly charge you more then its worth

Posted on Sep 16, 2006

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: Clarion ARX9170

Go to the12volt.com you can find it there.

Posted on Sep 24, 2007

robotek
  • 1512 Answers

SOURCE: NAD 712 Stereo Receiver

the lamps i use on all NAD displays(and have done since the early 1990's) last heaps longer.You can get them from RS components in your country. They are a 14v 37ma type, and seem to last. Never had any come back for replacement again. P/N 351-9585. Increasing the ballast resistor where fitted by 25% in valua also helps preserve them

Posted on Jan 27, 2008

  • 111 Answers

SOURCE: I have a CDX-M8815X unit only works with remote commander

The problem is the ribbon cable,the one connects the face to the main board,if you live in USA you can order it from pacparts.com or sony.com.
For replace it you will need to open the unit and open the face by moving manually the gears,then remove the side screws of the face and remove face,then remove the cd mech. you will see the ribbon connector.Just replaced and put everthing back togheter.
Good luck

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

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1 Answer

Hookin equalizer to tape deck and recever


The equalizer I have seen have Line in, line out, tape in, tape out and that is how you utilize a unit like this. The line IN goes to the receivers tape record out. The line out goes to the receivers Tape play in or monitor, The tape deck hooks to the equalizer. The record or input of the tape deck hooks to the EQ record out, the Tape decks output hooks to the EQ's Tape in connectors. All these are stereo so there are left and right sides which you need to keep consistent. Red on a cable means Right, the white or black on cables mean Left or the top RCA connector on most equipment.
When playing back a tape the tape monitor is turned on with the receiver and left on. The way you record on tape from any source of the receiver is to select that source and it should go to the equalizer. Then the deck should record that source. To play a tape of the deck hooked to the equalizer then just press the tape monitor button on the EQ otherwise the Equalizer will just act as a loop and equalize any signal source that is coming from the receiver and the tape monitor on the receiver should stay on most of the time. Some equalizers have two tape inputs so you would hook another deck to that input and the owners manual of the equalizer should say how to select buttons to transfer tape signals from one to the other. If you master the concept of inputs and output of audio equipment then this hookup becomes another easy thing to do.

Sep 22, 2012 | Sony TC WE435 Stereo Dual Cassette Deck...

1 Answer

Connecting a tape deck and equalizer to a stereo receiver


Outs to Ins in a Tape Loop on the receiver. Model numbers make it easier if we or you can find the manuals for the receiver. If only one Tape Loop, nest the tape deck into the tape loop on the equalizer.

http://archiwumallegro.pl/technics_shge70-869230896.html

Sep 15, 2011 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Hello, Can somebody please tell me how I can hook up my Yamaha EQ70 to my Yamaha RX-V663? Thanks very much!


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Mar 05, 2011 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How do you connect the dbx eq to a home stereo system


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically convert ed to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Jan 10, 2011 | DBX 215 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How do I install the dbx 2231 EQ


Like any other eq...

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Rec-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Play-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.


[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Sep 23, 2010 | DBX 2231 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How do I hook up technics equalizer sh-ge70


This is boilerplate I wrote a long time ago for general eq or sound processors. Without know to what you are connecting, well, read on...

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Aug 05, 2010 | Technics SH-GE70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How to connect to reciever


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Jul 21, 2010 | Technics SH-GE50 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How to connect jacks from gemini stereo graphic equalizer eq2010 to harmon kardon avr40


I couldn't find the manual for this receiver, so you may have to adjust some of the terminology below to the labels used on the HK.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Mon as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Mon is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Apr 11, 2010 | Gemini Sound Products EQ-300 Home...

1 Answer

I need a hook up digram fof an optimus model 31-2025 stereo equalizer


http://support.radioshack.com/support_audio/doc48/48943.htm

Ten-Band Stereo Frequency
Equalizer (310-2025) Connections Faxback Doc. # 48943

Follow these steps to connect the equalizer to your audio system.

CAUTIONS: Use only shielded audio cable with RCA-type connectors (not
supplied). This type of cable is available at your local
RadioShack store.

Before you connect the equalizer, turn off all components in
your audio system and unplug their power cords.

Before you plug in the equalizer's power cord, complete all
connections and be sure the equalizer's POWER button is out.

1. To connect the equalizer to your receiver, connect the receiver's TAPE
OUT jacks to the equalizer's MAIN IN jacks.

Then, connect the equalizer's MAIN OUT jacks to your receiver's TAPE
IN or TAPE MONITOR jacks.

2. You can connect a tape deck to each set of tape jacks (TAPE 1 and TAPE
2) on the back of the equalizer.

To connect each tape deck, connect the equalizer's TAPE OUT jacks to
the tape deck's in jacks. Then, connect the tape deck's out jacks to
the equalizer's TAPE IN jacks.

3. Plug the equalizer's power cord into your receiver's switched power
outlet or any standard AC outlet.

WARNING: The equalizer's power cord has a polarized plug. To prevent
electric shock, do not use an extension cord or other
receptacle unless you can fully and easily insert the plug's
blades.

4. Connect the power cords of all other components.

(wr 08/04/98)

Feb 24, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Equalizer hook up.


only hook up to tape monitor or else u wont get an audio signal . .....also hook all equipment to amplifier not eq ...it goes tape cd tuner and any type of external equipment to amp.then find tape 2 it sould be called tape moniter and have a separet botten for u to select it goes record to eq and play from eq

Aug 27, 2007 | Spectrum Technical Hifi EQ-B5100...

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