Question about Sony Cybershot DSC-H3 Digital Camera

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8x10 inch pictures transfer to Photoshop as 9x12 centimeters

I have my camera set to take full file sized pictures but after I have put them on my computer using iPhoto they have been reduced to only 9x12 centimeters. They look really pixelly when I try to increase the file size in Photoshop. How can I make sure the full files get on my computer so I can use the full file in Photoshop?

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  • brendaboonst Jun 01, 2009

    What kind of like window pic manager?

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Open them in some like window pic manger and change the size there then after that up load them to your photoshop

Posted on Jun 01, 2009

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I would like to transfer a photo file of 7500 MB. Tells me not enough room. Help!


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Setting dpi on my nikon d3100


DPI (dots per inch) is an output specification and is irrelevant to the camera. The camera puts a value into the field simply because it has to put something there. The DPI is set by the printing program when it prints a picture. A picture printed at 4x6 will obviously have more dots per inch than the same picture printed at 8x10.

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How to get 300 dpi with canon sd630


Dots per inch is a measure used by printers when printing a picture. As such, it is irrelevant to the camera when taking a picture. There's no way to change the value the camera inserts into this field. Your photo editing/printing program will let you change this value if you need to. However it is usually more convenient to specify the output size instead of the resolution. For example, you might specify a 4x6 or 8x10 print and let the program figure out how many dots per inch it needs to use to produce a print of that size.

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How do I change resolution for pictures on camera? What should the resolution be set at?


Press the Menu/OK button. Repeatedly touch the down-arrow function area until you see the "Image Size" option. Touch the MP icon area to enter the image size menu. Touch the left-arrow function area to select the desired image size. Press the Menu/OK button to confirm, save, and exit.

What do you want the resolution set at? What do you want to do with the pictures? If all you want to do with them is to send them by email or to put them on the web, the VGA setting (640x480) is probably enough. If you don't ever print pictures larger than 4x6 inches, the 3M setting (2048x1536) is probably adequate. If you're going to want larger prints, the 8M setting (3264x2448) will let you make 8x10 prints and even larger.

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Hi there I just bought a eos d2000 camera and am concerned about the file size when transfering the images onto my laptop. they seem to be way smaller than most digital images and im not shure if this is a...


Go into the camera's settings and see if there is an option there to change the resolution, if it's the size in MegaPixels you're concerned about.
There may also be an option to take the pictures in RAW format rather than JPG, if it's the size in MegaBytes that you're concerned about.

Other tell-tale signs of small files could be:
File is a video file.
Picture was taken as a burst or panoramic.
Digital zoom was at full. (Try setting the camera to not use digital zoom - it's basically just cropped.)

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Took extraordinary pictures with nikon d40 but can't edit them


You have your camera set to RAW format. It is not a compressed file, it is a full size file. Opening this in editing programs will either crash your computer or will refuse to open because of the size of the file. They are not damaged but your computer cannot handle the files. You should take them to a photo shop and have them put the files on a cd and consult your manual to change your camera to JPEG format.

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72 dpi instead of 300


In elements 6 go > Image > Resize > Image size > Resolution change to 300

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Canon 5D resolution question


The 5D has a 12.8 mega pixel sensor.

2 x 4 ft. is 24 x 48 inches, so you have to cover 1152 sq. inches using 12.5 million pixels.

Spreading 12.5 million pixels over 1152 sq. inches means 10,850 pixels per sq. inch. Taking the square root gives you a maximium resolution of 104 pixels per inch (or 'dpi')

Photoshop will allow you to increase the resolution by a process known as 'interpolation' .. increasing to 300 dpi using Photoshop before printing will give a better result.

NB. Depending on your printing process, you may end up dealing with files up to 500Mb in size ....

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Confused about Resolution Sony DSC-T7


2.2 MB is the size of the file on your hard disk. Being a .jpg, it is a compressed file. The file size does not reflect the size of the image stored inside the .jpg. Yes, the size sounds about right. It will increase or decrease depending on how much detail there is in the picture. If, for instance, your picture is made up of nothing but uninterrupted blue sky, the disk file will be quite small - as the .jpg does not need to store much information (the more repetitive information, the smaller the file). On the other hand, if your photo consists entirely of nothing but blades of grass, the disk file will be comparatively large. When you see "DPI", that refers to print resolution. So, since you're not printing, but rather, viewing onscreen, Photoshop "assumes" a convenient "screen resolution", as though you printed on the screen (don't ask!). If you look at the other settings, you'll note that Photoshop also thinks your photo is 36" wide!!! You adjust the DPI (or photoshop will) when you print. Till then, it doesn't mean much. Let me give you an idea of your image's possible DPIs. Assume you really want to print a 36" photo: 2592/36" = 72 DPI If you make the picture 12" wide: 2592/12" = 216DPI At 10": 2592/10" = 259.2 DPI At 8" 2592/8" = 324 DPI How do you get my photos above 200 DPI? By printing the picture small enough, less than 12.96" on the wider side. See calculations above. The resolution at which you shot the image (2592X1944), will not cause blurriness. As for the cause? There could be any number. Was the subject moving? Were you? Did you shake the camera while shooting? Is your shutter speed too slow? Should you have been using flash? Is the camera autofocusing correctly? Are you waiting for the autofocus to lock before pushing the shutter the rest of the way? Etc. Hope this helps somewhat...

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1 Answer

S 5i Question: What are the best settings for quick pics


Hi: Let's go by parts... :) You want to print your photos in 8 x 10 inches without bluring some areas on the picture... in Europe we talk about centimeters. It's something like 20 x 25 centimeters. If you want the picture to be with the best quality for printing, then you have to set your image resolution in, at least, 300 dpi (dots per inch) - this you have to do with software, like Adobe Photoshop CS2. For you to change the resolution of your picture to print with that size without losing any quality, you have to have a picture with, at least, 3000 x 2400 pixels. So, it's better for you to take pictures with the highest quality in your camera, 2560 x 1920, and still you loose some detail. When you have a picture with the resolution 1024 x 768 taken by any normal camera, you will get a resolution of 72 dpi (the same resolution that pictures in the Internet or monitors have. When you print it at your size, 8 x 10 inches, the computer or the printer, one of them is going to change the resolution of your pictures. That process is called "interpolation" and it means that some pixels are generated with middle colors. It's dificult for me to explain the process without showing images but I think that if your search through Google engine you will find lost of pages talking about it... maybe one day I can post in my site about that subject ;) If you have any question about what I tryed to explain just post again ;) Regards

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