Question about Olympus EVOLT E-510 Body Only Digital Camera

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Olympus E520 Focus problem

I have two Olympus E520, and Both have problems with focus at large apertures and large focal distances (for example, shooting at f3.5 at an object 40 feet away). The images almost always were very soft, but if I shoot the same image using Live View and Contrast Detect AF, the image was SHARP. I have an E510 too, and in this cam with the same lens, the pictures always was sharp using Sensor AF (viewfinder).
This happens with my lenses: 14-42, 14-54, 40-150 f3.5-4.5, 40-150 f4-5.6.
If I close the aperure to f8 in the E520, the images improves, but with my E510 I can shoot the 14-54 wide open without any problem.
I live in Venezuela, so sending my two E520 to USA for warranty or service (I buy them in Amazon by Internet), is a pain to me. If you can tell me how to adjust the AF mirror to compensate for front or back focus, I will apreciate so much.
THANKS.

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  • eas2lv May 11, 2010

    Have you got this resolved. I've exactly the same problem I think the AF sensors need to be adjusted but my experience with Olympus service has been disappointing -- fast and friendly service but the the problem not addressed by the repair personnel. I want to send the camera again with a mnore detailed report but if you have any suggestions or further insight it might help. Thanks

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Will watch this post have same problem with focus especialiy indoor flash shots. a lot out of focus

Posted on Dec 19, 2010

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I got a Nikon D5000 and 18-55mm lens. When I take pictures using focal between 18-24 mm the deep of field is not sharp especially for landscape pictures. I made at list 200 pictures (the same image) test...


We need to understand Depth of Field first. Depth of field increase in two ways, one with the Aperture setting and one with the distance the lens is focused on. Example, at F22 focused at 10 feet the Depth of Field will be (assume for the example) from 7ft to 20 ft. You need to use the camera in aperture mode, set it to a "Slow" aperture, the larger the number the slower the aperture. Example F2.8 is "fast or Open, F22 is slow or "closed". The problem is not in your lens or camera. To get maximum Depth of fuield you need to shoot in Aperture Mode, set the f-stop to F11 or slower, F16, F22. The use manual focus to focus the lens. Using auto focus is "ok" for many scenes but to get MAX Depth of field you cannot let the camera select the object to focus on. Here is the BEST way to do it. Setup your camera in Aperture mode, set F-stops as suggested above. Focus on the subject that you want and shoot. Dont forget, the camera will be using slow shutter speeds like this so camera shake will create blurr that can be confused with out of focus. Shooting slow at F11 to F22 usually required a good tripod. Also, another thing to know, Field of focus is deeper "behind" the spot you are focusing on than in "Frint" of the point you are focused on. Good luck, Worm1855

Dec 28, 2010 | Nikon D5000 Digital Camera

Tip

Controlling Depth of Field


A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Cameras

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I want to take a picture that is focused on the subject, while everything else in the picture is blurry


What you want is a limited depth of field. There are three factors that control the depth of field: subject distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. The greater the distance, the wider the DoF. The shorter the lens, the greater the DoF. The smaller the aperture, the greater the DoF.

One problem with compact cameras is that they have very small sensors. This means that they have short lenses. And short lenses mean they have wide depth of field. This is often an advantage, in that more of the scene is in focus. Unfortunately, this works against you when you don't want a wide DoF.

At the short end, the S2's lens focal length is 6mm. This will put just about everything in focus. Even at the other end, the focal length is 72mm. With a 35mm film camera, most portrait photographers use lenses at least 85mm in focal length in an attempt to minimize DoF to draw attention to the face and blur the background.

Unfortunately, the best you'll be able to do is to set the camera to the portrait mode, get as close to the subject as possible, and zoom in as much as possible. I realize the last two conflict with each other, you'll just have to find the proper balance for whatever you're photographing.

Nov 18, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to use olympus e520 in less light


The first answer is from some one who obviously is not familiar with Olympus (and many other brands of DSLRs) or he would know that many lenses do not have manual focus scales to use. Olympus Standard Grade lenses do not include a focusing distance scale.

The more important issues for you are determining -
1) Are you trying to use "Live View" to focus?
If so you are using a less sensitive auto focus mode. One of the benefits of using a DSLR is that it can use more sensitive auto-focus systems than Point

Sep 05, 2010 | Olympus Evolt E510 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focussing


If they are located different distances from the camera, align the point of focus on the individual you want in focus. You can increase the the range of focus somewhat by changing the f-stop value to a higher number (like f 22). This could bring objects in a wide range of distances- say 20 feet to infinity - into focus. With a lower value f-stop (f 3.5 for example), the range of focus will be much smaller, say 20 feet to 30 feet. You'll have to take the camera out of AUTO and set to A or Aperture mode to do this though. Good luck!

May 08, 2010 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

What mode do i use to make a person clear and the background blurry?


It's not the mode, it's the aperture. What you want is called a "narrow depth of field". Depth of field is controlled by three factors: focusing distance, lens focal length, and lens aperture. For portrait work you probably want a focal length in the 50-100mm range and an aperture as large (smaller f/number) as you can get.

How you get the large aperture is up to you. Probably the easiest is to select Aperture-priority mode and crank it as far as it goes.

I encourage you to experiment with it. If you can't get another person to help you, just put an object where you'd prefer to have a head. Use different apertures, and different focal lengths (moving closer or farther to compensate). It's not as if you're paying money for film and processing, after all.

Apr 21, 2010 | Olympus EVOLT E-500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How to blur the background in picture taking?


Get another camera :-(

You want to reduce the depth-of-field so that the subject is in focus while the foreground and background are out of focus and blurred. Depth of field (DoF) is dependent on three factors: distance, lens aperture, and lens focal length.

The farther the subject, the deeper the DoF. If you take a picture of a distant mountain peak, the mountain behind that and sunlit the clouds on the horizon will also be in focus. If you get close enough to a flower, you might get the front petals in focus while the petals in the back might blur.

The smaller the lens aperture, the deeper the DoF. Landscape mode, for example, will try to use a smaller aperture in order to get everything in focus while portrait mode will try to use a larger aperture in order to blur the background.

The shorter the lens focal length, the deeper the DoF. This is the killer. Due to the small size of the image sensor, the EX-Z750 has a very short lens: 7.9mm to 23.7mm. Even at the telephoto end of the range, 23.7mm would be considered very wide by film photograpers. A 24mm lens would give film photographers a sharp shot from foreground to horizon and, unfortunately, you're seeing that as well.

Note that the DoF is dependent on the actual focal length, not the 35mm equivalent you may have read about. This is a law of physics, not something that lens designers can easily alter.

Mar 04, 2010 | Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focusing problems


You may be beyond (up to close) the focal capability of the lens. Even though there is a macro setting, the lens may not have the capability to focus on an object that close (without adding an external macro lens). The specification on the minimal distance for focus should be listed in the owner's manual.

Mar 04, 2008 | Olympus SP-350 Digital Camera

4 Answers

Nikon D80


EXPLANATION.
1. The problem with 18-135 lens is because it make from plastic. Main problem from plastic is it can be reshaped after a few usage. When the shape ran out, the contact point will be defective. When the contact point didnt really touched, the processor cant send signal to lens to do autofocus (the lens focus using the lens motor, not the body). When u set to manual focus, the body doesnt need to instruct the lens to focus.
2. You are focusing something that is to near than the focal point.

SOLUTION.
1.Try cleaning the contact point on the lens. Then mount it back until the F showing up (F= aperture). This solution depend on your luck too. if the gap between to contact is so far, then it might happen back. Usually when u need it badly. haha
2. try to get more distance from your subject. Just keep press the shutter until the camera focus.

CONCLUSION
1.But new lens with metal mounting. It will last and durable.
2.Buy macro lens to close up. normal lens wont focus at short focal point!!~

Oct 08, 2007 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

S4 No Multiple Focus?


Acceptable focus depends on many things and an appreciation of aperture, lens, distance and shutterspeed is needed before understanding the finer points of 'depth of field' (what will and wont be in focus). Like all cameras, an auto focus camera cannot make everything sharp, it has to focus on one thing, usually in the middle, and the rest of the picture either falls in or out of focus, depending on the combination of the above points. For example, if you shoot on a wide-angle lens with a small aperture, say anything above f8, you should have everything you want in focus. In contrast, on a longer telephoto lens with a wide aperture (more light being allowed to hit the film or chip or whatever) the resulting picture will be sharp within only a few inches of the focus point. This can be really nice if you are shooting single portraits in bright light as the background will become extremely blurry and colourful. I am presuming that the shots you are concerned with had the camera settings set to wide aperture priority, possibly because it was dull or you had a 'sport mode' selected where fast shutterspeed is needed to catch rapid movement thus a wide aperture is needed to compensate and so shallow depth of field results. I don't know the camera you are using or whether you will understand any of the above. If you need a greater explanation of what is essentially a science, please let me know.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax Optio S4 Digital Camera

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