Question about Garland H283 Gas Kitchen Range

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Thermostat seems ok, but gas won't flow from oven burner.

I've checked the resistance on the thermostat and all checks out. There is an electric glow plug-type igniter near the oven burner, which heats up beyond red hot, but no gas seems to be flowing. The symptoms started with the oven taking longer and longer for the burner to ignite - up to 40 minutes once. Finally the burner will not come on even after an hour later after having the thermostat turned to broil. Any help on diagnosis would be appreciated.

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  • Anonymous Mar 22, 2014

    Thermostat doesn't turn off the burner

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Hi, Even tho the ignitor is glowing, it is getting weak and will need replaced. The ignitor is not pulling enough amps to open the gas valve.
This is very common problem with the gas ovens.
If I can assist you further, please let me know.

Vic

Posted on May 29, 2009

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Dbl Wall Oven 790.4777.3400 Top Mount begins to heat but then shuts off like the cancel was pressed. Replace thermostat, overload, control panel, and control board. Any other ideas?


The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Oven comes on and off intermittently or heats very little:

If the timer feature is activating and you have not touched the timer button at all, this would have to be a failed Electronic Oven Control. The timer button is either shorting at times or closing on its own from heat or moisture. The Electronic Oven Control would need to be replaced to repair the problem.

Or Why does it take the oven so long to bake?
When the food is taking way too long to bake, it's probably a weak bake ignitor. Replacing the ignitor usually fixes this problem, but you probably want to verify that the ignitor is the problem before replacing it.

Sometimes the oven thermostat or oven sensor can be calibrated wrong, or it may be faulty. If your particular range has an oven that uses an electronic thermostat, and the oven temperature is off by tens of degrees, you probably have to replace it.
On most units that have a mechanical thermostat, you can actually remove the thermostat knob, and adjust the knob to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. On many models, there's a screw on the back of the knob with a small calibration plate or ring. You can loosen this screw and adjust the calibration plate. Remember to tighten the screw again. If yours isn't adjustable, and the temperature is off by a large amount, you should just replace the thermostat.

Or Oven safety valve needs to be checked with multi meter ohms / voltage

ALSO Test the Burner Heating Element The stove's burner heating element is a coil of metal sheathed in an insulator. Electrical current travels through the element. Resistance to the passing of electrical current causes the element to heat up. A precise temperature cannot be set for a burner, instead it is turned on and off repeatedly by the control to the achieve an average temperature. When it is set to a low temperature, the element is cycled on and off more frequently. For high temperatures, the heating element is energized longer with fewer on and off cycles. Some burners have two elements, with the second only being used only for high heat settings.
Before testing the heating element, unplug the appliance or shut off the power at thefuseboxorbreaker panelto avoid an electrical shock hazard.
When a burner does not heat at all, or only heats up to a lower than expected temperature, the problem is likely to be with the heating element, the temperature control switch, or the wiring. If it only heats at the highest temperature, the problem is with the control or an electrical short, not the burner. If the burner works only intermittently, the problem is likely in the wiring or connectors. To test the heating element, try the following steps.
First, disconnect the heating element from the stovetop. In most cases, this is done by lifting up the burner on the side opposite of the terminals (the part of the burner that disappears under the stovetop). Remove the decorative ring.
Inspect the style of connection. If the burner element has visible blades that fit into the receptacle block, pinch the block with one hand, and pull the heating element free with your other hand. If the terminal block clamps over the element, the housing must be removed and the burner wires disconnected. Unsnap the metal piece or remove the screw that secures the receptacle block and then disconnect the element.
Inspect the heating element. If you find bubbles, warping, or damage to the insulation sheath, the burner must be replaced. If the terminals are dirty or corroded, this can cause poor temperature control, intermittent problems or complete failure to heat. Clean the terminals with steel wool or very fine sand paper to restore good conductivity.
Test theresistanceof the heating element using amulti meter. Set the multi meter to the ohms setting X1 and touch one probe to each of the terminals. A normal reading is typically somewhere between 20 and 120 ohms. The exact reading differs by manufacturer and mode. If the meter reads infinite resistance or the other extreme of the scale, zero resistance, then the element is damaged and should be replaced. If the measured resistance differs significantly from the expected range, the element is probably bad, but if possible, determine from the manufacturer what the actual resistance should be.
To test for a grounded or shorted element, touch one probe to the surface of the burner and the other probe to each terminal in turn. If you get continuity at any time, the heating element is defective and should be replaced.

Why is the oven temperature incorrect?

The oven temperature control is usually controlled by a thermostat that uses a capillary and liquid filled bulb. When the bulb's liquid gets heated up, it expands and puts pressure on a diaphragm which opens and closes a switch that controls the gas to the burner. Just set the dial to what you need the temperature to be. Over time, it is possible for your thermostat to lose its calibration. Sometimes, the thermostat sensing bulb comes loose from the holder. If it is out of place, the thermostat may be getting faulty readings. If this is the problem, re-aligning the bulb properly will take care of this problem.

Digital display models use a sensor to control temperature. If this is faulty, replace it. Other ovens use a mechanical system to control the temperature.

On many models, you can adjust your oven thermostat using a small screwdriver. The adjusting screw is located on the thermostat valve stem. Remove the knob and you'll see the screw underneath it. You want to turn the oven on and run it through at least two cycles while watching a calibrating thermometer in the oven for high and low temperatures. Adjust the screw as necessary to fine tune the temperature.

Some models don't have an adjustable thermostat, and you will have to replace the thermostat if you want to resolve the problem.

Mar 16, 2014 | Kenmore 47772/47774/47779 Electric Double...

1 Answer

I have a Maytag gas over/stove, Model number MGR5755QDW. The broiler heats, but the oven does not. What are the possible causes and how do I troubleshoot?


If you are having problems with the oven, the first thing to do is figure out if you have a pilot light system or a glow bar system.
Problems with the pilot light system.....The flame has gone out, re-light the pilot. The pilot flame will not light - possible oven control is not sending gas for the pilot light. The pilot light works but no main burner ignition - possible pilot assembly is dirty and the pilot flame is too small, safety valve and thermocouple is faulty, the bulb from the safety valve is out of position and the pilot flame is not touching the thermocouple bulb. Some ranges use a standing pilot light ( small flame is on all the time ) while others use an spark ignition to light the pilot light flame and the pilot light flame heats up the thermocouple bulb to allow the main gas to flow through the oven burner.
The flame needs to heat the bulb up enough to tell it to open the gas valve. Several things can go wrong here that keep this from happening:
The pilot flame may not be hot enough, usually because the flame is yellow instead of pure blue or is too small. The cause for this is usually a dirty pilot assembly. The pilot assembly would either need to be cleaned or replaced.The thermocouple bulb may not be positioned properly in the flame. You can't heat the bulb properly if it's not in the pilot flame! The thermocouple bulb needs to be in the upper third of a pure blue pilot flame--that's the hottest part of the flame.
The thermocouple itself may be burned out. It happens. It's a internal part of the gas valve so, no, you can't just change the thermocouple bulb separate from the gas valve.
But when you turn on the oven or the thermostat calls for heat, the pilot flame gets bigger and jumps down so it can heat up the thermocouple bulb. This extra gas to increase the pilot flame size comes from the thermostat.
If the pilot flame jumps upwards or just gets bigger, but doesn't shoot down, then you need to replace the pilot assembly.If the pilot flame size does not increase or jump down when turning on the oven thermostat, then the problem is the thermostat not sending enough gas to the pilot assembly. It's also possible that the pilot gas supply tube has a hole in it somewhere.
One final point on the spark-assisted pilot ignition systems. The spark comes from the spark module--the same module that sends spark to your surface burners to light them up. If you're not getting a spark when you turn the oven on, then there are several possibilities:
There could be a problem with the switch in the thermostat. You can confirm this by doing a simple continuity test of the thermostat contacts. If you don't read zero ohms when you turn the switch on, replace the thermostat.The spark module could be bad. You'll need to measure the voltage at the oven terminals of the spark module when you turn on the oven. If you get 120v but no spark, it's probably a bad spark module. Replace it.
Could be a bad spark wire or broken electrode.
Problems with the glow bar system.....You may even see the orange "glow plug" (called a hot surface igniter) glowing orange and so assume that it's OK. Not necessarily!! You have to measure the current/amp drawn by the igniter and compare it to this repair sheet before you can say it's OK or not. The gas valve has a bi-metal that open when a certain amount of current flows through it to heat it up. The igniter is wired in series with the gas valve. As the igniter gets older or weaker, it's resistance increases to the point where not enough current is flowing to the gas valve bimetal to open it up. As a result, the gas valve never opens up. BTW, a common symptom of the early stages of this problem is erratic temperature control in the oven due to delayed firing of the bake burner while cooking.
The hot surface igniter will not come on - check igniter with a ohm meter, you should have continuity through the glow bar, the glow bar can also crack = new igniter time. The glow bar comes on but the main burner will not light - you should have an amp probe to check properly, but often this is a hot surface igniter problem. The hot surface igniter often looses it's ability to get hot enough to open the gas safety valve. The safety valve can fail, but most times it is just a bad hot surface igniter. The hot surface igniter can also quit part way through cooking , in other words the oven may cycle a couple of times and then it just sits there with the red glow from the igniter. See this service sheet for the proper way and amp readings for the hot surface igniter system. Hot surface igniters do weaken and will eventually generate less heat than they normally could. When this happens they can still allow marginally correct current to flow to the oven gas valve for it to open but not get quite hot enough to ignite the gas burner immediately. When this happens, gas released into the oven can sometimes build up to the point where when finally ignited, the amount of gas lit can cause a small explosion inside the oven or cause an odor of gas with out the oven working. Yes, your glow bar igniter can glow orange-red and still be bad!! How a common gas valve works -click here.
You can get required parts from www.repairclinic.com
This will help. Thanks please keep updated.please do rate the solution positively .thank you for using fixya.

Jan 26, 2010 | Kitchen Ranges

1 Answer

I replaced what I thought was a bad igniter.But still had no glow from new igniter. Must be something else.Where do I go from here?


Hello there: The oven bake burner and ignition components are located beneath the oven cavity. In most cases the oven bottom panel can be removed for access (check your owner's manual) but on some models the oven burner has to be accessed from below in the warming or broiler drawer area. If accessing from the top, a 'flame spreader' (flat metal plate) above the burner may also need to be removed to see the burner itself.Many ovens use a single oven burner in which case they only have a single gas valve and ignitor. The same burner is used for both bake and broil functions, the broil usually being in the drawer area below the oven. Higher-end models may have a separate bake and broil burner. On such a system there will be two ignitors, one for each burner. They may also employ a 'dual' gas valve (see illustration above) instead of using a separate valve for each burner.Some range models may have an additional broil burner located at the top of the oven cavity which may be referred to as a 'waist high' broil. If not, broiling usually takes place in the drawer area below the oven, which uses the same bake burner for the broil function. Most gas ranges currently available employ one of 3 basic gas ignition systems; pilot ignition, hot surface ignition system (which uses a 'glow bar' or 'glow coil' - aka an "ignitor") and a spark ignition system. The latter two being referred to as "electronic ignition" systems as they use electricity in one form or another to operate the oven heating system. Only the pilot ignition system has an actual "pilot" (which is a small but real "flame") which might need manual lighting.
If the surface burners of a range are a spark ignition type, the oven IS one of the possible kinds of electronic ignition systems and thus will not usually have a "pilot" which needs lighting. Be aware though that just because the surface burners might light via a spark doesn't necessarily mean the oven uses the spark type ignition system too.
There is one older style of electronic ignition system which does also use an oven pilot but it is very rare and such a system hasn't been used in oven models since the early to mid 70's. It is the 'constant pilot' *electronic ignition* system.


Making Observations
The oven burner's operation will usually need to be directly observed while in operation as the first step to troubleshooting problems.Ignition System Type Links
Ignition System Types:
  • Pilot Ignition
  • Electronic Ignition with Constant Pilot (rare)
  • Electronic Ignition with Glow Ignitor (most common)
  • Spark Ignition System

  • Is there continuity between the oven gas valve's terminals?


    Hot Surface ('Glow Bar') Ignition System (most common)
    This is the most popular system currently used for ovens and is comprised of a control mechanism (whether thermostat or electronic control), the oven ignitor and an oven gas valve.


    What happens in this style ignition system is that the thermostat or electronic control switches power to the oven ignitor and gas valve circuit which are connected in series (one after the other). As power flows through the ignitor it heats and draws current (measured in amperage). Once the oven ignitor draws a specific amount of current the oven valve opens to allow gas to flow to the oven burner where the glowing hot ignitor (glow bar) ignites it. Power must continually flow through the ignitor and oven gas valve for gas to be released into the oven burner to create a flame.

    It should usually only take in the area of 30-90 seconds for the oven ignitor to reach the proper resistance to allow the proper amperage to reach the gas valve to open it and for the ignitor to ignite the gas at the oven burner.

    Dec 30, 2009 | GE Ovens

    2 Answers

    Oven won't light - electronic ignition oven


    Hi, it could be your, electric heating element and oven burner gas valve. both are located in oven burner compartment, remove last bottom panel, locate oven burner, the valve that feed gas to burner, has two wires connected to it, that's oven valve could be faulty, also look on side oven burner, you will see electrical heating element, could also be faulty, it's better to replace both oven valve and element, that's the most common problem, but first check oven thermostat, that's knob you turn to light oven, if thermostat o/k, then it's your oven valve or heating element, (used to ignite oven burner) or call a mechanic, good luck.

    Aug 12, 2009 | Kenmore 33169 Gas Single Oven

    1 Answer

    Oven takes up to 15 minutes to light. glow plug does appear to be bright orange immediately after turning oven on. it is a propane unit.


    Hi, glow plug (element) should glow red, maybe you got faulty thermocouple, located ot bottom of oven burner, unit where gas enter oven burner, they could either be gas pilot or electrical element as metering device, give a little tap, could be stuck, could also be your thermostat, check oven thermostat, many ways to check oven thermostat, give thermocouple a little tap located at beginning of oven burner, if it didn't work, call a mechnic to make futher checks. good luck.

    Aug 05, 2009 | Magic Chef CGR3725 Gas Kitchen Range

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    I have a Maytag MDR5755qdq gas kitchen range that will not turn on. The burners work fine. Do you have any suggestions.


    Check the pilot and valve in the stove if it is gas. Make sure there is gas and pilot is lit. If it is electric, then check or replace relay/fuses to the heating element.

    Jul 10, 2009 | Maytag MGS5770 Gas Kitchen Range

    1 Answer

    There is no gas going to my oven. Only the


    hello, i can help you. first of all, if the broiler works then you must have gas coming into the stove. as far as getting to the gas line, it is in the rear of the stove. typically you have to pull out the stove to get to it. that said, here are some things to consider.

    Not all gas ranges/ovens require electricity. If yours has a clock, electronic igniters, self-cleaning, or any other electrical features, the unit needs electricity to work properly. Check to see whether there's power getting to the range/oven. Does anything turn on--even a light? If not, check for a blown fuse or tripped circuit breaker.

    It won't bake If your oven won't bake, check these:

    Bake igniter
    Other causes
    Bake igniter Usually when an oven won't bake, it's because the bake igniter is weak or burned out. The igniter is a small, round or rectangular device, that's about 1 inch by 4 to 8 inches. It's near the burner itself.

    The burner is the tube-type device the gas flows through before it's ignited. It has many small holes on the sides to let the gas, when ignited, form a long, low flame. If the igniter is weak, if it glows red but doesn't get hot enough, or if it's burned out, the gas doesn't flow to the burner and the burner won't ignite. If this is the problem, you may need to replace either the igniter or the gas safety valve. Usually the igniter is to blame.

    Other causes Other reasons that your oven may not bake are:

    • The clock settings are incorrect (if you have timed baking or a self-cleaning oven).

    • The thermostat is defective.

    • The safety valve that prevents accidental gas flow is defective.

    • The selector switch is defective.

    It bakes poorly Here are two instances of when food "bakes poorly:"

    • When the item takes far too long to finish, you probably have a weak bake igniter. Often, you need to replace the igniter, but you may want to troubleshoot the oven's electrical system further to more precisely locate the defect.

    • When the temperature is consistent but too high or too low, the oven thermostat or sensor is either mis-calibrated or defective. If your oven uses an electronic temperature-regulating device, you may have an electric sensor in the oven instead of a mechanical thermostat. If the oven temperature is off by 30 to 40 degrees in this type of unit, you must replace the sensor.

      On many units with a mechanical thermostat, you can remove the thermostat knob and adjust the knob itself to more accurately represent the actual setting of the thermostat. If, when you remove the knob, there's a screw on the back of it with a small calibration plate, you can loosen the screw, adjust the plate, then tighten the screw again. If the knob isn't adjustable, and the oven temperature is off by more than 30 to 40 degrees, you need to replace the thermostat to solve the problem.


    Jun 22, 2009 | Ovens

    1 Answer

    Kenmore gas range model # 362.7121191 oven


    Could be the thermostat, glow bar, valve or wiring but usually the glow bar

    Feb 22, 2009 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

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    Speed Queen dryer does not heat...


    you have weak gas valkve coils and they will work when cold but after a few cycles they become electrically open and will not allow the gas to flow.
    just replace both gas valve coils and that will fix your problem.

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    My oven doesn't work but the burners do, what's up with that?


    I was looking for a solution to my problem. In reading the comments, I can probably provide more information than is given here. My Kenmore gas oven won't ignite. I have over 25 years as an electronics techincian so I am very aware of lethal voltages. I unplugged my stove, it is a 120 volt model. After pulling the panel off so I could get to the thermostat which is the piece the knob goes on, I plugged the stove in and checked to make sure I have 120VAC to the thermostat. I have a red wire which has 120Vac, the thermostat probe wires, and a yellow wire which goes down to the back of the oven.
    My red wire had 120Vac. I then unplugged the stove, very important at this point, and meaured with an ohmmeter across the yellow and red wires. When the oven is in the off position this is open. When I turn the oven on it is shorted. That should confirm the thermostat switch works. The next thing that has to happen is the glow bar/igniter has to glow. This is like all gas appliances, it has to glow to heat the gas valve and turn the gas on. My igniter doesn't glow so I ordered a new igniter. If your glow bar glows, it could still be the glow bar/igniter or the gas valve is not allowing gas to flow even after it is heated up.
    If anyone sees a problem with this procedure, please let me know.

    Nov 19, 2008 | Kenmore 79012 / 79014 / 79019 Gas Kitchen...

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