Question about Lucien Piccard 26024 Wrist Watch

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Watch slow; no further adjustment possible.

My pocket watch is running slow.The adjustment lever is fully on the "F" side. How can I make the watch go faster without dismantling it.

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You cant

Posted on May 28, 2009

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How do I set the time on a Capri watch when the Crown is at the top? I can't pull the Crown out, but it does turn and the watch is running.


Is it a pocket watch? if so it may be lever set. take off front of watch and pull lever at 2 o;clock out about 1-4 inch. set with crown. return lever to normal position. done.This was typical of ril road watches of that period.

May 14, 2017 | The Watches

1 Answer

I want to know the value of my ornet antimagnetic pocket watch i think its from hong kong and this watch is old the case of this watch have a man fishing somewere in the river with lots of the treeson his...


It's rarely possible to give any kind of definitive valuation without seeing a watch (pocket or wrist) in person, but it sounds like you have an inexpensive pocket watch that was probably made in the 1960s, less likely made in the 1970s or 1950s. The use of the term "antimagnetic" on the watch, as opposed to "17 jewels," suggests that the watch is powered by a 1-3 jewel pin lever movement, rather than a more expensive movement. These movements can keep quite good time, but they are not valued by watch collectors unless the rest of the watch is of compelling interest.

In terms of value, your pocket watch has more value as a piece of jewelry than as a vintage timepiece. Most watch collectors would not be particularly interested in your watch. In the United States, I've seen similar watches, in running condition, sell for $5-10 at vintage watch fairs. Around where I live (the Northeast), as a piece of jewelry, your watch may be worth twice that but not more. I cannot speak to pricing in other parts of the country or internationally.

Jun 12, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

I have wound muy omega speedmaster automatic to tightly at the bezel and it has stopped working. Can you tell me if there is something inside that can be released tostart it again?


There's a misconception that mechanical watches can be "overwound." Mainsprings in old watches can indeed set in place and freeze up if they are wound tightly and not permitted to unwind, but the steel used in modern mainsprings used in the past 50 years or so is an alloy that's much less likely to bind up compared to 19th century pocket watches. In addition, the winding mechanism in an automatic (aka, self-winding) watch is designed to slip once the spring has been fully wound so that the rotor and winding parts aren't damaged by suddenly binding up. In a manual wind watch, once the mainspring is fully wound, it's simply not possible to wind the watch further unless the mainspring snaps or comes loose from its anchoring--in which case, you'd be able to wind the watch forever without ever storing power in the mainspring to drive the movement. While it is possible for a watchmaker to open your watch and release tension on the mainspring, it's overwhelmingly likely that something entirely different is keeping your watch from ticking and keeping time.

Mechanical watches generally stop running for two reasons: (1) lack of power to the movement; or (2) something in the movement that is preventing the movement from running. If your mainspring is fully wound, you have power to drive the movement. It's time to think about what could be causing #2.

Problems in the movement are usually caused by dust or dirt that preventing a delicate movement part from working properly (e.g., dirt at the pivots can freeze up a gear, stopping a movement). However, it's also possible to have a mechanical failure, such as a bent tooth on a gear in the train. A further possibility is so-called "overbanking," which some believe is the origin of the myth of overwinding. A mechanical watch's balance assembly drives a tiny little forked lever back and forth to control the escapement and the rate at which the watch keeps time. If the watch receives a physical shock or if the parts are worn, it's possible for this tiny lever to get bumped out of its tiny pivot and jammed in place. When that happens, the watch will stop, even though a superficial check will seem to indicate that the balance is still moving freely. At the same time, because the watch isn't ticking, the mainspring isn't unwinding, and so the watch cannot be wound further.

In my experience, watches usually stop running due to dirt at the pivots or on one or more gear teeth. I generally see overbanking in older watches or mechanical watches that have been less precisely made and not routinely cleaned over their working lives--though I have seen it also occur in a few newer watches that were dropped. Better designed watches--and I would include Omega in this category--have escapement levers with built-in guards to make it more difficult for them to overbank.

As for how dirt gets into a watch that's supposed to be water-resistant and generally sealed against exactly that problem--well, as odd as it sounds, watches "breathe," and this process draws in dust and dirt over time. Worn against the body, a watch warms up and expands the air inside it, pushing some of it out of the case; upon cooling, some air is drawn back into the case. This process is obviously reduced in watches designed with a significant degree of water resistance (aka 50 meters or more), but the process is accelerated when you pull the stem out to set the time or even wind the watch via the stem--there's some degree of air gap between the stem and the stem tube, or else it wouldn't be possible to turn the stem. This microscopic dust--in minute quantities--mixes with the lubricating oils inside a mechanical watch and increase the friction in some of the key pivots. Over time, the combination of naturally solidifying oils that are thickening and a minute amount of dust can turn lubricating oil into glue. The watch cleaning process flushes the old oil and accumulated dirt from the pivot bushings so that fresh, uncontaminated oil can be used to re-lubricate these key gear axles.

Bottom line: if your mechanical watch has stopped working, it's much more likely that something is interrupting the intricate gears in the watch movement rather than a problem with the mainspring. A competent watchmaker or watch repair technician should be able to identify the problem relatively quickly and give you a definitive answer as to the true cause of--and cost to fix--your watch.

Jun 11, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

How do I set the time on an old Regina pocket watch. I can wind it and it runs well. The piece to wind the watch does not pull in or out to set the hands.


If you can wind your pocket watch using the crown, but you cannot see any way of setting the watch, you probably have a "lever-set" movement, though it's possible you might also have a "pin-set" movement. Do you see a little button you can push in, either at 1-2:00 or 10-11:00 on the watch case? If you, you have a pin set watch. Push and hold that little button in while you twist the winding crown, and that will let you set the time. End of problem.

Setting the time on a lever-set watch is a bit more complicated and will require taking off the front bezel of your pocket watch--the metal ring that holds the watch crystal in place. Pocket watch cases of this time are usually made in 3 pieces: the bezel, the main case body, and the back. The procedure used to remove your bezel depends on the type of watch case you have.

Take a close look at the front of your pocket watch. Do you see any hinges at the bottom (that is, below 6:00 and where the bezel meets the main case body)? I suspect that you won't, as double-hinged cases are usually associated with an older style of pocket watch, but it's worth checking. If you do see little hinges for the FRONT (it's more likely that the back will be hinged), then look for a little lip on the bezel that's used to pry open the front. Pull on that to open the case.

If you don't see hinges, which is what I expect, your front bezel unscrews. You can try to do this with your bare hands, but it's a lot easier if you have a bit of "gripping" rubber so your hands don't slip so badly. I have a small rectangle of shelf non-slip stuff that works perfectly for this. Turn the bezel counterclockwise. It may resist a little bit at first due to accumulated dirt, but then it should easily screw off.

Once you have the bezel away from the face, look closely at about 2:00 on the watch dial. Just at the edge of the dial, you should see a little lever or button. GENTLY pull this away from the watch face until it stops. Now, when you turn the winding crown, you should be able to set the time. Once the time is set, gently push the lever back to its prior position. Now, you should be able to wind the watch without changing the time.

Be very careful when screwing the bezel back onto the watch body. These parts typically have very fine threads, and it's easy to cross-thread the pieces. Don't force the two pieces together; once the threads catch properly, the front bezel will screw on easily without resistance.

An older style of pocket watch required the use of a little key to set the time from the back of the pocket watch movement. However, these watches were also wound by the same key, so the fact that you're able to wind this watch with a crown suggests to me that your watch doesn't use this system.

May 27, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

How to adjust the speed dial of a18 size lever set thanks


Hi bonex_boat99,

If you have one of the more common style pocket watches like Elgin, Waltham, Illinois, etc., the adjustment of the spring tension on the balance wheel spring or "hairspring" is virtually the same for most models. It doesn't matter if the watch is a Crown (stem) set or lever-set. Open the back cover, and most watches will have a second dust cover protecting the movement.

On the main housing cover of the balance wheel and hairspring configuration is a small adjustment lever. Note the current position of the lever now, and move it slightly (very, very slightly) in the direction you need to correct for. Most movements will have "S" for Slow, and a "F" for Fast. Of course this is pretty obvious for most people. This adjustment will cause the balance wheel hairspring to become a little shorter or tighter for the faster adjustment, and therefore, cause the watch to speed up slightly. The reverse procedure will "lengthen" the spring, and slow the movement down.

Since you're apparently doing this yourself or for an associate, be careful with these adjustment, making certain to not slip and damage the wheel or spring. Run the watch for several hours, and compare the timing accuracy with your known amount of error, then make further adjusts if needed.

Of course, you still may wish to take it to a certified watchmaker or repairman for this service, especially if the watch is a heirloom or otherwise valuable piece.

Good luck with this procedure! Let me know if I can be of further service.

Thanks, Bill

Sep 15, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

Waltham American- runs too slow


Open the back of the watch and the balance wheel will be visible. There should be an adjustment lever working on the sprin.

There might also be a + and - sign to indicate which way to move it to make it run faster or slower.

Feb 22, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

I have just inherated a 1923 studebaker (southbend) 227 pocket watch. it runs ( a little fast) but runs I need to know how to set the correct time


Unscrew the bezel on the front counter clockwise, there you will find a lever at or about the 2 number..

Pull out the lever and you can set the watch.

Hope this tip helps you.

R/
David

Feb 19, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

Watch is fully wind up but doesn't run?


Several solutions:

Needs cleaning is the best possible reason.

Broken balance due to being dropped is second.

r/
David

Dec 29, 2009 | Sterling J3E Hamilton Antique Pocket Watch

1 Answer

Trying to figure out how to adjust time


You have broken or displaced setting lever in your pocket watch.
That's why it is not possible to set the time. No matter in what position the winder is, the setting gear are not engaged from the clutch wheel and the time adjustment can not be done. At the same time the crown wheel still engaged in any position and this is why it still winding in both positions.
As repairs of this can be done only by skilled man, go and see your nearest watchmaker and ask for help.

It is understandable that I can not execute repairs over the net, so, rate it as if I did it, please.

Mar 14, 2009 | Watches

1 Answer

How do I change the date on a Colibri Pocket Watch?


Usually all quartz watches are supplied with calendar setting mechanism and it is very simple-
try to pull out crown and you will notice that there are two clicks,so, when the crown is pulled out to the first click, the date can be adjusted by the turn of the crown. When crown is pulled further out (second click)- the watch is in hand setting position and you can adjust time.
Did it help?

Dec 15, 2008 | Colibri PWS-95877-N Pocket Watch

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