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Dual Booting I've got two reformatted, non-partitioned hard drives both with XP freshly installed and I want to dual boot from them but, when I switch on the machine it goes straight to the C drive installation (I can access the F drive and see all that is there) When I go to the boot screen there is only one system shown. So, how do I get the thing to fire up from the F drive system? C is set as master and F as slave. THEN - if anyone can answer that one - how do I dual boot without turning the machine on and off? Thanks

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Yo u cant dual boot without restarting the machine unless you use virtualization technology ie virtual pc or vm ware


Regards Al

Posted on May 26, 2009

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Dual boot xp with windows 8


No solution now, Install Windows XP again on first partition, Make sure BOOT.INI, NTLDR, NTDETECT.COM in the same partition in which Windows XP is loaded. Then install WIndows 8.
OR in the current scenario you've to do much technical work using third-party tools.

Feb 27, 2014 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

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How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





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If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

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How to make dual boot with window xp vista and windows 7


Dual booting Windows is the most challenging of the three options; however, making it work can be very rewarding. The process of creating a dual boot environment differs from Windows Vista to XP. Please follow the instructions according to which version of Windows you are currently using.
To run two operating systems on your computer, you will need to add a second partition. If you are not familiar with adding a partition, you can learn how in this section. Please note: each operating system will be able to see the other partition; thus, you can share files between them.

Dual Boot with window x and windows 7

You will need third party software to create a second partition for Windows 7; once you have created the partition, you can install Windows 7 on it.

Create a New Partition (Vista)

Click the Start button, right click Computer, and clickManage

In the left pane, click Disk Management

Now create a new partition by shrinking a previous volume so you can use the newly created space. Right click on the partition and clickShrink Volume.

Now right click the free space and click New Simple Volume…
Specify the volume size and click Next

Format the drive as NTFS, give it a label, and click Next

Power on your computer, insert the Windows 7 DVD, and restart your computer

Press the necessary key to initiate booting from your DVD (usually Esc or F12.)

Windows will now load the installation files.

Click Install now
Your computer will restart several times during the process as it configures itself and installs updates Be sure to leave the DVD in the drive and let Windows take care of itself.


Memory (RAM) – 1.25 GB required, 2 GB memory recommended.
Recommended 15 GB hard disk space per virtual Windows environment.
NB: Windows XP Mode is only available in Windows 7 Enterprise, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate.

on May 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Is this computer able to dual boot win 7 and xp


Which version of xp are you trying to install 32 or 64 bit ?

Your ability to install a second operating system on your Windows 7 system hinges on one thing: partitions. If your computer has only one partition, you can't dual-boot your system without erasing all information on your computer. Two hard drives, or two partitions, enables you to dual boot. Check this information first, before proceeding.

Click "Start" and type "disk management" into the search bar. Click on "Create and format hard disk partitions" in the list of programs to open "Disk Management." Look at the list of partitions and available drives. The information here will be different on every computer. "C" is your primary hard drive and active operating system partition, and this drive contains your Windows 7 installation. You can't install Windows XP here without formatting the system. Check for secondary drives and partitions in Disk Management. Your system may have a "D" or "E" drive. Some computer manufacturers create a hidden partition with recovery software: don't remove this partition. If you have a secondary partition called "D" with more than 2GB of free space, you can install Windows XP here. b> Installing XP b> Insert the Windows XP Setup disc into your CD or DVD drive and close any windows that appear. Shut down your computer with the disc in the drive. Turn the computer on and look for a message saying "press any key to book from CD." Press any key on your keyboard when this message appears. Most computers are configured to look to the CD or DVD drive first, before booting to the operating system. If your system doesn't recognize the disc, you will have to enter your BIOS and change the boot order. Look to your manual for information on changing the boot order. Press "Enter" on the "Welcome to Setup" screen to load the Windows XP setup program. Read the license agreement and press "F8" to accept. Windows will detect that an operating system is already installed on your primary partition and present a list of other partitions to install XP. Use the arrow keys to select your secondary partition ("D") and press "Enter" to confirm that you want to install XP here. Then choose what to do with the partition: leave the file system intact or format the partition using FAT32 or NTFS. Windows XP supports both file systems, but requires NTFS on partitions larger than 32GB. You don't need to format the drive to install XP. Follow the prompts on screen to enter your personal information, serial number, and date and time. The setup program copies files to your PC and reboots -- don't press a key to boot to the CD. When you have to operating systems installed, a DOS screen appears asking you to choose an OS; press the down arrow key to highlight Windows XP and press enter to complete the setup. You will have to choose this every time to boot into XP, otherwise your computer will boot to Windows 7 by default. Hope this helps.

b>

Jan 06, 2013 | HEWLETT-PACKARD Pavilion Desktop with AMD...

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I tried turning my GX60 into a dual-boot and didn't do the partitions right. Sort of put 2 OS in one partition. Now it won't boot and it gives me readings of Drive C: can't be accessed or...


Hi,
I think that the operating has gone corrupt and needs to be reinstalled. First, make sure that your PC can read the hard disk in BIOS (at boot up, press F2 to enter BIOS and check "Drive Configuration). You should be able to find the hard drive (as well as CD/DVD ROM) here. If not check the hard disk cables etc. At boot up, you may also press F12 for Boot Menu and select the primary hard disk for booting up the PC.
Secondly, boot the PC from CD ROM, Delete the partitions and make fresh partitions for installation of the operating system. You may also add the hard disk of your PC to another PC (as slave) and delete all the partitions from the operating system and make fresh partitions. Place the hard back into your PC and proceed with installation.

Hope it helps! Good Luck! Thanks for using Fixya!
CreativeTECH

Sep 22, 2011 | Dell OPTIPLEX GX60 Motherboard

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.
Step 0: Download the Windows 7 Beta and Burn It to a DVD
Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.

Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive
Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP
To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.
To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista
The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.
Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space.
Step 2: Install Windows 7
Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).
Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.)
After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.
Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.

on Dec 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Hello i m using hp product name-KQ311AA-ACJmodel no-a6450in and serial no-INA81008F5.problem is whenever power is switched on after booting when the option of loading either windows xp or windows-7 comes...


Hi, not sure exactly what you are describing here; you are I believe using dual operating systems? There does seem to be a conflick, causing niether operating sytems to bootup correctly. I will give you the procedure to delete and install one operating system, if this is not what you wish, can you come back to me?
Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} To install new version of XP. Insert XP CD into drive, reboot pc pressing ESC button, or delete in some machines. This takes you into BIOS, change your primary boot device to CDrom, save changes and reboot. Select boot from CD once this appears and wait for files to be installed. Select the part of the hard drive you wish to use for your operating system (usually the largest) and select partition this drive. Delete any previous os, and reformat hard drive. (Be aware this removes everything saved on your hard drive, so always back up first) Re boot afterwards and reinstall of operating system will commence automatically (do not select boot from CD here).



Jul 08, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

How can i format my laptop?


u can format in progress install new windows

Jan 14, 2010 | Acer Aspire 5600 Series 5630-6951 Laptop

1 Answer

I have installed Ubantu in my aspire 5050. Now I want to install win XP so that I can open MS Office from Linux


do you want to make a dual-boot system? you must have installed windows OS first and leave a non-partitioned drive in your hard Disk. Then you can install Ubuntu next, instaling it to the non-partitioned drive. When the PC boots, you will be prompted to what OS to boot.

Anyway, you can Install Windows XP in any free Drive. But it is dangerous since Windows Installer might destroy your Ubuntu installation files.

Oct 05, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

I need to setup a dual boot computer. I have 2 hard drives each has an os I need the option to select at startup


Try Install KDE on your desktop, I think its much better than gnome for booting setup. There's another way which one you'd like to booth by striking the F8 key repeatedly on the restart or starting your PC and select the drive which drive you like to boot.Or you can configure it on your bios setup by hitting the del key and configure your boot priority.

Sep 11, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

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