Question about Philips 50PFP5332D 50 in. Plasma Television

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Pink pixils on light background

My 50" plasma has pink pixelations running through my white and light colored backgrounds. What can I do?

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When this happens the voltages on some of the circuit boards can be adjusted to claer up this problem. THIS IS NOT some thing a person should do them self, the voltages are dangerous and critical to the operation of the set. "This should only be done by a trained service technician."

Posted on May 26, 2009

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How to turn off backlight on iphone 4


There is no separate "back light" setting like there used to be on some earlier phones.

In the Settings app of your iPhone, there is a section called "Display & Brightness". You can use that to make your phone's display brighter or dimmer, but as you have probably discovered, it dims or brightens both the foreground and the background elements together as one.

You can turn it all the way down, which is very dim and hard to see in normal indoor light conditions, but may be preferable in extreme low light conditions like in a nightclub setting, or in complete darkness.

Why isn't there a separate back light setting?
To fully answer this, I would probably have get into more than you ever wanted to know about displays.

First, there is really no background or foreground on today's smart phone displays. The foreground elements and background elements we see on the iPhone are really a graphic illusion created by lighting individual pixels with different colors. All of these pixels are on the same plane, so nothing is really behind or in front of anything else. It's just artistically drawn to look that way.

Brightness is simply an "intensity" setting applied uniformly across all of the underlying individual pixels within the display matrix, and has no relationship to color. For clarity, let's look at the difference between lightness in colors, versus display brightness:

COLOR LIGHTNESS is a matter of how much WHITE (all the RGB colors summed, for example) is present in a given color. This has nothing to do with display brightness.

DISPLAY BRIGHTNESS is a matter of how much LIGHT INTENSITY is applied uniformly across all pixels in the display matrix.

At zero display brightness, you would not see white any better than black, blue, green, red or any other color. You wouldn't see anything.

Why did you expect to be able to control the back light?

Prior to the smartphone era, the displays on early cell phones and pagers (and lots of other devices that had displays) had a lighted background that contrasted with dark foreground elements.

The background intensity was a separate setting on those devices, but that's because the background was the only thing that had intensity. The foreground elements were solid black LCD (liquid crystal display) segments that were used to form characters and very simple graphics and lines.

Everything we see on today's smartphone displays is dynamically drawn by lighting different pixels with different colors at different times. Individual pixels on a Retina display are nearly microscopic in size--they cannot be separately discerned by the eye.

Imagine a matrix of microscopic light bulbs, each of which can separately change to any of millions of colors and levels of brightness at any time, on command. Just imagine the sheer number and complexity of possible commands to control a Retina display!

Even if Apple wanted to provide a new feature that enabled us to separately control the perceived "back light", it would only be an illusion as well.

Such a feature would require some sort of complex algorithm to determine which pixels are involved in what you perceive as the "foreground" elements at any given time, so it could add intensity only to those pixels considered to be "background" at any given time.

Since "foreground" and "background" elements drastically change shape (and location) at any time, such a feature would be pretty daunting to implement.

You might be better off using a pure black graphic as your background image if your goal is to have more contrast to make the app icons stand out.

Cheers,

-=Cameron

Aug 12, 2014 | Apple iPhone4 4G iPhone 4

Tip

Why the white or black spot on LCD Display


Dead and Stuck Pixels <br /> Pixel defects for an LCD monitor are defined as one of two types: dead or stuck. Technically, both types of pixel defects are stuck pixels but it really deals with the electrical currents and the state of each pixel or sub-pixel. <br /> A dead pixel is defined as a pixel or set of sub-pixels that has failed and is permanently in the off position. This condition means that the pixel will not let any light through. This can be observed as a dark or black spot on a brightly colored or white background. <br /> A stuck pixel is defined as a pixel or sub-pixel that has failed and is permanently in the on position. This can be either with a single or multiple sub-pixels for a given pixel and is best observed on a dark or black background. A white pixel means all three sub-pixels have failed while a green, red or blue pixel means one of the sub-pixels has failed. <br /> Hope this helps, if so do rate the Tip

on Jan 16, 2011 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Magental background on all prints looking like a pink papr instead of white


That sounds like a white balance issue to me. Do you use manual white balance setting or auto white balance?

Nov 05, 2013 | Konica Minolta Bizhub C550

1 Answer

Pink horizontal lines on samsung plasma tc when white background


I have this same tv and have the same problem, anytime there is a white background there is this pinkinsh tint in the middle of the screen, easily seen during those Apple commercials.

Aug 13, 2012 | Samsung 3D Plasma TV PN58C8000YFXZA...

1 Answer

My brand new LG 37' Led/Lcd t.v. had four very light white spots that you can see in the background what causes this?


Hello
Dead and Stuck Pixels
Pixel defects for an LCD monitor are defined as one of two types: dead or stuck. Technically, both types of pixel defects are stuck pixels but it really deals with the electrical currents and the state of each pixel or sub-pixel.
A dead pixel is defined as a pixel or set of sub-pixels that has failed and is permanently in the off position. This condition means that the pixel will not let any light through. This can be observed as a dark or black spot on a brightly colored or white background.
A stuck pixel is defined as a pixel or sub-pixel that has failed and is permanently in the on position. This can be either with a single or multiple sub-pixels for a given pixel and is best observed on a dark or black background. A white pixel means all three sub-pixels have failed while a green, red or blue pixel means one of the sub-pixels has failed.
Hope this helps, if so do rate the solution

Jan 16, 2011 | LG 37LC7D 37 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

MY lg plasma tv has very small white dot in the background. IS there a fix for this?


I THINK ITS A DEAD PIXEL , YOU CAN'T DO ANYTHING WITH YOU DISPLAY , CHANGE THE PLASMA DISPLAY COST YOU MORE THAN HALF OF THE TV

Oct 06, 2009 | LG 50PX5D 50 in. Plasma HDTV

1 Answer

White has turned pinkish


sounds like the linear adjustment is out of whack.....most projection type tvs, projection, lcd, plasma, have to be correctly aligned so that the color grids overlap each other to properly display the correct hue being created. you'd need the service code to re-adjust it, or have it serviced. also possible that one of the color grids is bad, but if you have all three (red,blue,green) colors showing on the entire screen area i would doubt it

Jul 24, 2009 | Vizio GV42L 42 in. LCD Television

1 Answer

Plasma TV


If you mean the picture froze or formed fuzzy pixelated picture and crackling, this will be due to a poor aerial signal to the tv, but if you mean the screen rolls with pink/white patchwork type squares and shows the picture in the background, all be it fuzzy, then that's the same fault as I am getting and have had to report the fault to LG as I am on my second TV. If it is the problem mentioned in the first sentence, it is happening to our friends in OS and they have been told by specialist aerial fitters, the signal is too weak for the tv.

Mar 16, 2007 | LG 50PX4DR 50 in. Plasma TV

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