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Exposure button no longer working.

Nikon D200. Had camera for 2 yrs. While shooting at a football game my xposure button stopped working. I can't take a picture. The letters CHA are flashing on the control panel. I changed the battery (twice) but no change. I changed memory card with 4 different cards. Every time the control panel will read" This card can not be used" I used four different cards, the ones I've been using for years, but same message appears. I restored all default settings and then checked every button, lever, and knob to be sure it wasn't between settings. I can't find this error message anywhere in the manual. I alson tried various lenses to no avail.

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Re: exposure button no longer working.

When you insert the card and get the CHA Flashing error, remove the card and format it. Reinsert it again.
Should work.

Also, if it doesn't work, there is a strong possibility there's a broken or bent pin in the memory card section of your camera. Just look closely and inspect that section to see if there's a broken or a bent pin.
This happens when you forcibly insert the card the wrong way. This has happened to a lot of users.

Posted on Oct 20, 2007

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I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...

If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.


Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

3 Answers

I have a Nikon D200 I have been using in high school football stadiums shooting football, using a Nikkor 2.8 180 ED lens. I have noticed while shooting there isan orange horizontal strip that appears...

Have tried resetting the settings of your camera to make sure that this is not a problem with some of its settings , but if still the same after the reset this can be a problem with the lens....

Hope that helps......

Oct 11, 2008 | Nikon Digital Cameras

1 Answer

All my exposures are dark experienced this once before and it was some setting that was at either 1 2 or 1 3 I can 39 t recall the setting any ideas as to what it would be Added by avatarpatty jenks 8...

Did you check the exposure compensation setting? The button is on the top right of your camera and is labeled with a "+/-" symbol. Press the button and use the main command dial to zero the setting.

Sep 15, 2011 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Any grid in nikon D200?

To turn on the Grid Display in the view finder...

Press Menu button, then go into the Custom Setting Menu (looks like a pencil). Select "Shooting/Display", then select "Grid Display", select "On" then "OK".

Happy shooting!

Sep 26, 2009 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Error 11 at nikon camera

First, if you can try the lens on another camera body, please do. See if the same thing happens on a different camera body. If it does, it's a problem with the lens. If not, you need to look at the camera. You can verify it's the camera by placing a different lens onto the body and see if you're experiencing the same problem. If it is indeed the body, I would suggest you take a pencil eraser and gently but firmly clean the contacts located on the lens mount. It's my experience (I also shoot with a D200) that often times when a lens isn't autofocusing, it's due to direty contacts either on the lens itself or the camera body. Cleaning them is a good start though and will narrow your issues down to the lens or the camera body. After cleaning, try the lens again to see if it's working correctly. If not, send it to Nikon in New York for repairs.

Jul 11, 2009 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

I have a nikon d200, lately the shutter lags 1-2 seconds.

It is probably delaying while it autofocuses.  If it is like most Canon cameras, depressing the shutter half-way should allow you to focus without taking a picture, then when the moment is right, depress the shutter button fully to take the shot.  You will want to practice this a bit to get used to it.  Shooting in low-light it can take longer to find the focus, so it becomes more necessary to use this technique.
Hopefully that helps, but I am not a Nikon user.

May 10, 2009 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera With 18-135MM

1 Answer

Nikon D200 / photos coming out magenta somtimes blue

Set it to a manual white balance colour temperature, 5200K being an average one to start testing at. Does this make a difference? If not, then the sensor, RGB lightmetering sensor or exposure board may be at fault. The peripheral area of most sensors is used for white balance metering, which denotes a sensor issue, although if the exposure board isn't reading this information correctly, then it will give varying results. However, Nikon's 420 pixel RGB sensor on the D200 may also be taking WB readings. I'll be talking to Nikon soon, but try manual settings first.

Jun 30, 2008 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Prob with exposure analog...

i could tell you how to fix it but it would probably cost more than a new camera. just buy a new one.

Jun 25, 2008 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

Exposure button not working

Have you done the firmware update? If not the update is available here: CLICK HERE FOR MACINTOSH or CLICK HERE FOR PC.

If that didn't solve your issue, you may have to go to an authorized Nikon dealer to have the camera reset. The internal battery cannot be serviced by untrained persons. I would also suggest that going forward, you carry your camera inside your coat when you're outside in cold weather, since electronics are easily damaged (especially software) by frost and / or water vapor which can very easily damage parts of your camera (hardware and software) in any weather.

Oct 20, 2007 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon d200-manual mode

x250 means flash synch speed is set to 1/250.  Is your speedlight connected or is you on-camera flash up?

Sep 20, 2007 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

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