Question about Sigma AF 28-200 Lens

1 Answer

Zoom lens My zoom lens on my digital camera suddenly quit moving it's full travel distance and when that happened it corrupted the flash card.  With a new flash card the lens works but still doesn't travel it's full distance. The lens is 28 - 200 but now it only moves from about 55 - 100.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points


    An expert that got 5 achievements.


    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

  • Expert
  • 117 Answers
Re: zoom lens

What camera are you using is the lens making a noise when it stops focusing  call sigma imaging uk 01707 329999

Posted on Dec 13, 2008

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Hello, I own a Quantaray 28-90 MM zoom Macro lens. I would like to know its equivalent Nikon lens, which would be one of the following: 1) D or G type Nikkor 2) CPU Nikkor lens other than D...

This Quantaray lens is similar to a Nikon D-type lens in that it has an aperture ring. However, Nikon D- and G-type lenses communicate subject distance information to the camera using a proprietary protocol. Third-party manufacturers have to reverse-engineer the protocol, and they don't always get it right.

What this means for non-flash photography is that this lens works fine, with only minor exposure differences since Nikon's Matrix metering uses the subject distance information.

For flash photography, subject distance information is critical. My advice is to try it as D-type lens and look at the results. If they look good, fine. If they don't, try it as a non-D- and non-G-type lens (the second choice in your list).

The above assumes you have the Nkon-mount version of the Quantaray lens.

Jan 26, 2015 | Quantaray Camera Lenses

1 Answer

Wont turn off-on

Taking out the battery, when a camera acts strange, is a good thing ONLY. be sure the camera is not busy saving pictures, because you could damage all pictures on the memory card.
I'm not sure the lens was out, when it was connected to the computer. Let us assume it was. Normally, the battery should be charged when the camera is connected to a USB connector on the PC. But not all USB connectors are perfect wired. And if you use a USB hub you can be sure the battery was not loaded. So as soon as the camera came from the PC it needed full power and could not get it.
Now you removed the battery, but before placing it back in the camera, please charge it on an external charger. When you place the charged battery, and the yellow light starts flashing again and won't stop quick, you could try to reconnect the camera to the computer and see what that brings. I would have switched off the camera, before I disconnected it from my PC.

Than the sand issue. If just a grain of sand is in the lens bellow, it could serious obstruct the lens from going back. If you can see the grain of sand, you could try to get it out. Very thin needle (or two?)
But if you can't see something, don't move the lens at all.
You could damage the gears in the focus and zoom mechanism.
I wish you luck with the camera.

Nov 11, 2013 | Samsung Digimax EX1/TL500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon 17-85 IS zoom ring locked at 17mm.

Sometimes, if that lens has heavy use or if it has been traveled with a lot, several of the internal zoom screws may come loose deep inside the lens and cause the zoom to freeze. It requires a complete disassembly of the lens to reach the screws and re-seal them so it does not happen again.
Bob Kilbourn

Aug 08, 2011 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

Cannot figure out how to take good macro shot with new Tamron len

With an SLR you only get true macro focussing on a lens that has proper macro focussing abilities. Unfortunately in the photogaraphy world, there are a huge number of lenses which claim to have macro ability but are stretching the term far too much.

Strictly speaking, macro means that the lens is capable of producing images on the sensor which are the same size as the actual subject or even bigger, at life size this is described as 1:1 macro. Your Tamron lens is only capable of a maximum 1:3.7 "macro", and that's only at the 200mm zoom setting with the subject no closer than 45cm from the lens. By SLR zoom lens standards, that's actually pretty good, but if you want to go closer and get greater magnification you need to either use a supplementary close-up filter lens or for better optical quality use a set of extension rings. The trade off with close up filter lenses is poor image quality and usually plenty of colour fringing and with extension rings is that if you're using a 2x magnification at 200mm, your f5-ish maximum aperture at 200mm becomes a very dark f10.

The only way to get good macro results is to either use a proper (=expensive) macro lens and excellent lighting, or use extension rings plus a good ring flash unit. However you can improve your macro by investing in a more capable zoom lens with a closer minimum focus distance and a better aperture at the telephoto end of the range. This can be expensive, or you can pick up some very cheap 35mm film SLR lenses. Using an adapter will never allow you to achieve infinity focus on a Canon digital SLR but you can get a close focussing 200mm f3.8 very cheaply. The crop factor of your smaller sensor means it will have the same angle of view as a 310mm lens but the aperture will remain at f3.8. As Canon digital SLR's have the deepest body register (lens to sensor distance) of the current systems then you'll also have the effect of using it on an extension ring. The downside is that you'll have to use the lens in a totally manual mode as no information will be communicated to your camera body. By mounting the lens back to front using a reversing ring you can achieve some really stunning macro magnifications but then you need a tripod, powerful flash and absolutely no wind... There was also a Makinon 80-200mm zoom which sells for next to nothing on auction websites, but it had a macro collar which allowed it to achieve around half size macro (1:2).

Alternatively, if the Fuji still works and does the job just keep it in your camera bag ready for those types of shots. overall, that seems the easiest and best solution unless you really want to get heavily into macro shooting.

I hope that I've helped you, please ask more if there's anything unclear. I've tried to keep a very complicated subject as simple as possible. Please also take a moment to rate my answer.

Mar 05, 2010 | Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DI XR for Canon

2 Answers

My nikon 55-200 zoom lens is stuck at full zoom

Don't force it.
Did you get dust or dirt in it?
The only solution is to bring it in for service or send it to Nikon if it is a USA model.
Nikon USA will NOT repair any gray market items.

Jul 12, 2009 | Nikon Zoom-Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED...

5 Answers

I want a nature camera

First, to answer your lens question, 400mm is unlikely to be adequate. On a digital camera this is going to give only 6x magnification. Some nature subjects will require much more than that.

Also, do not need a fully featured 'pro' camera. These have features which you may not want. Look at lenses first, and let that dictate the camera.

It rather depends on your intended subject matter, but in general for nature photography (I presume you are thinking of vertebrate animals, rather than plants or insects.) you require very long focal length lenses. This is because wild animals are very difficult to approach, and many are comparatively small as well. As an example, you may only be able to get within 30ft of a heron however well you are hidden, and for a bird that size at that distance a 400mm lens will just be big enough. Just.

As a rule you want to fill the frame. So to work out what focal length you need you need to work out the size of the image in the camera. This is not difficult to work out, as the magnification is only the ratio of the subject to lens distance to the (Thoeretical) film/sensor to lens distance. (Most long lenses are physically shorter than their theoretical focal length. That's the true origin of the word 'telephoto', the lens is optically 'telescoped' into a shorter package.)

In reality this varies a little as the lens moves in and out to focus it, but in practice you just use the focal length of the lens. So for out Heron which is about 10,000mm away with a 400mm lens the magnification is 400/10,000 = 4/100 =.04. A heron is about .5m tall (18inches roughly), and 500mm x 0.05 = 20mm. The hieght of a digital sensor is about 16mm, so that's full height, but a heron is a tall bird, so portrait mode might be better, and that will be closer to 24mm.

So in our example, a 400mm lens will do but only for an animal half a meter in size, if you can get thirty feet away. And that's pushing your luck. (The nearest I ever got to a heron without sitting all day in a hide hoping for it to show was twice that distance!)

Most subjects will be smaller, or further away. Getting within 150ft of a deer in clear view is quite a challenge even for an expert stalker. At 1.5m tall with a 400mm lens, the image will be 12mm high. If the subject is a grizzly bear, then I doubt you would want to be that close.

Of course if you are wanting to photograph smaller animals, then the problem is compounded. Especially if they are easily spooked.

In essence you want as long a lens as you can manage, so you can photograph from a comfortable (for the amimal) and safe (grizzly bear) distance. However, as in many instances you won't be able to control that, and the range of animals you want to photograph will vary in size, you really want either more than one lens, or a really good zoom.

Really good zooms of long focal length are very expensive, so two lenses might be a better option, or a long lens with a factory matched multiplier would be almost as good. (Zoom lenses cannot perform at optimum over all the focal lengths available, so really good ones are difficult to design and make.)

So you first need to decide what focal lengths you need.

Then you have to consider camera shake. As a rule of thumb you need an absolute minumum shutter speed of 1/(focal length in mm) for hand-held shots. As you will be using long lenses, with small apertures, you won't be able to take shots hand held.

One (partial) solution is to use an image stabilized or shake reduced system.

Image stabilization is built into the lens, and works by moving optical elements to compensate for vibrations. This makes the lenses much more expensive, and will eat batteries. This has the advantage that it is always optimal for the lens.

Shake reduction moves the sensor in the camera, to achieve the same effect. It makes the camera a little more expensive, but the lenses are a lot cheaper, and that's where most of your money will go!

(Note, that digital image shake compensation is not the same thing, and reduces the image sharpness.)

Of course the traditional solution is a really sturdy tripod. Most tripods are simply not up to the job, so you need to check out as many reviews as you can. But be aware a really good tripod will not be cheap.

The camera mount must be really rigid if the camera is not to move during exposure (A camera with a mirror-up function can help. The mirror is the Major source of vibration in a camera, this allows the mirror to flip well before the shutter fires allowing time for vibration to die away.) and the tripod itself must not flex or twist.

A tripod with the means of suspending a weight underneath is useful, extra weight will make sure the tripod feet are firmly placed and help pre-stress the tripod so any residual 'slack' is taken up. (A simple hook that you can hang a kit-bag on will suffice!)

A good tripod and head could cost £200 or more alone!

As for selecting the lenses....

Canon do some very long focal length lenses but they are also very expensive (£2000+) These include a zoom with image stabilization, and a dedicated multiplier to double the range. A good used example will cost over £1000.

However, you should be aware that Canon are generally quite expensive, and other manufacturers produce similar systems, at various prices. I would look at Nikon, and Pentax, these brands are still well regarded.

Jan 23, 2009 | Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM Autofocus...

1 Answer

Distance scale does not move on canon efs 17-85mm lens

Yes, this is normal. Some zoom-lenses adjust the focus when zooming, to always keep the subject in focus. Those tends to be the more expensive lenses.
So you don't have to worry, nothing is wrong with your lens.

Jan 10, 2009 | Canon EF-S 17-85MM F/4-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

Lens for Nikon D60

I will try to help you, but please understand that my experience is with Nikon film cameras. Assuming that the D60 works in a manner similar to a Nikon 35 mm body and that Sigma macro lens work like Nikon macro lens, you should be able to determine the usable subject to lens distance by experimentation. First, make sure the lens is in the macro mode. To do this you must set the auto-focus mode control to the manual focus mode (see your manual). On Nikon lenses, you must first set the focus ring to infinity, then move slider switch, which has two positions marked; "normal" and "macro., to the macro position. You should now be able to rotate the focus ring to the macro range. Use the zoom ring to zoom in and out and focus with the focus ring. The the range over which the lens to subject to lens distance will yield an in focus image will be rather limited and in the range of an inch or so to 6 or 8 inches.

Dec 09, 2008 | Camera Lenses

1 Answer

Lens is moving

It is not normal. Something may have loosened up internally. Set the lens to 50mm and then move the camera between pointing lens forward and lens down toward the floor as the camera might rest when you have it on a neck strap and bend over. I am guessing that gravity is pulling the lens out to the 200mm position. In any case, you should have a camera repair man look at it. I do not know what the repair could cost, but you have a superb lens and, if necessary, you may want to spend the money to fix it.

Oct 29, 2008 | Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR...

1 Answer

The Power Zoom appears to be locked at 80mm.

(I just cut-n-pasted the comment into the solution so this shows up as a solved problem in searches.)

"I've found the solution!
Just goes to show that sometimes it's worth simply calling the importer's service department, who told me in 30 seconds!!
Hold the zoom twist-ring and push, or click it up or down, depending on which way you are holding the lens.
So simple; I even accused him of not knowing what he was talking about.. and of course apologised profusely when it suddenly happened."

Dec 15, 2007 | Pentax Zoom Wide Angle SMCP-FA 28-105mm...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Sigma AF 28-200 Lens Logo

Related Topics:

147 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Sigma Camera Lenses Experts


Level 3 Expert

93802 Answers


Level 3 Expert

3283 Answers


Level 2 Expert

159 Answers

Are you a Sigma Camera Lens Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides