Question about Bernina Sewing Machines

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Thread problems The thread is spasmodically pulled through to the back of the sewing leaving a jumble of threads. Could be a tension problem but I don't know how to fix it. Machine is a Bernina 807

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  • thewalnuts May 25, 2009

    We've fixed it now!

    A previous repair to increase the tension on the thread as it exits the bobbin was the cause of the problem. The tail of the spring leaf should have been inserted into a slot in the bobbin carrier and it had been left out when re-assembled, so the thread would occasionally snag.

    Thanks to those who replied to our post for help.

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You need to take out the thread and and bobbin thread and re-thread your machine...take the bobbin out of the casing and replace it properly...now turn off your machine wait 30 seconds turn back on and sew on scrap piece of fabric

Posted on May 23, 2009

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Tip

Setting Sewing Machine Tensions


When you sew you want a nice sturdy seam, one that won't pull apart or leave gaps or cause puckering. To get this it's important to have the tensions set correctly. Many seamstresses get confused about how to set their tension. It's a fairly simple process once you understand a few basic things.

BASIC LAW OF TENSION to form the stitch: The UPPER thread tension changes the look on the UNDERSIDE of a seam while the BOBBIN tension, the bottom tension effects the appearance of the TOP SIDE of the seam. That is quite opposite of what most people think. Basically what you want is for the top and bobbin tensions to equal so that the stitch forms half way between the two.

If you can see threads from the bottom side of the stitch showing on the TOP side of the seam, like the graphic below, then either the BOBBIN tension is too loose or the TOP tension is too tight.

If there are loops on the bottom side of the seam, like the illustration below, then the TOP thread tension is too loose, or the BOBBIN tension is too tight. Typically the TOP tension is too loose.

If there is puckering on the top side then most likely the TOP tension is too tight, though it may also be the the BOBBIN tension is way too loose.

So how can we tell which it is? The best way its to begin by taking a scrap piece of the fabric you will be sewing on, or at least the same type of fabric, picking the widest zigzag stitch possible with a medium to long length of stitch and sew several inches. Now examine the seam remembering which is the top and which is the bottom. If it does not look identical on both sides then one of the tension settings is wrong. (it is also possible that the needle is the wrong type but for the moment let's assume it's the tension).

If there's a problem with the stitch you can use the above rules to figure out which tension is off. However, as the top and bottom tensions work together let's begin by going through a basic check-off list.

First examine the threading of the upper thread and make sure it is correctly following the path and isn't catching on something. This is really important when you think you've looked through everything and just can't 'see' the problem. Taking the time to go through these steps can save you a lot of pulled hair!

Next pull out the bobbin and examine it in it's case. Are the threads would around it evenly or are they all jumbled and crisscrossed? Jumbled up is a BAD thing. Try a different bobbin that is wound correctly. Now examine if the thread is coming out of the proper place, through the tension slot. Pull on the thread to see if there's total resistant. If so, something isn't right. But it can also be a problem if there is no resistance so let's now do this test.

Suspend the bobbin in it's case by the thread. Let it dangle there is space, still holding it by the thread as if it was a yoyo. It should dangle there with a little slipping, the length of thread between it and your fingers getting a bit longer. If it hits the floor there's no resistance! You have NO tension. That is BAD. Now, while still dangling it gently flick your wrist like you're holding a yoyo and wanting it to drop down a little bit, which is exactly what it should do if the tension is correct. If it doesn't release any thread at all, doesn't drop down a bit then the tension is too tight. Most bobbin tensions are adjusted by turning the little screw on the casing next to where the thread comes out. (Make sure that the bobbin turns in the case the right direction too which is the same direction of the slot!)

If the bobbin drops a lot it is too loose and you will need to tighten it a bit. Remember that a gentle flick should allow more thread to come out but not reel out. There should be some resistance.

Now that we have the bobbin correctly adjusted place it back in the machine and sew another test seam and examine it. By using the rules at the beginning of this tip determine if the upper tension is just right, too loose or too tight. Adjust the upper thread tension accordingly, first raising the pressure foot then turning the dial or however your machine adjusts tension. The higher the number the tighter the tension and vice-versa.

So that you know what the upper tension should feel like pull on the thread at a point BEFORE it goes through the needle first. Pulling after it goes through the needle puts a bit more tension on the thread and I want you to feel the tension before that point. If the tension is too tight and you pull on it after it goes through the needle it may break the needle if it's a small sized needle. You should feel some resistance. You shouldn't have to tug hard on it to pull more thread through but it also shouldn't reel out without any resistance. If the thread is breaking either the tension is very high or the thread is catching somewhere. Check the threading as well as look to see if the spool is turning freely on the spindle. Sometimes the thread will catch on the spool itself. When you buy a new spool of thread remember how the end was through a tiny slot on the side of one end? If that slot is on the bottom of the spool on the spindle it can sometimes catch the thread as it turns. Simply turn the spool upside down and re-thread the machine if needed.

Now once more do a test seam and examine it. Follow the above steps until the top and bottom of the zigzag are identical - perfect!
mszona.jpg

on Jul 01, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

My top thread keeps catching and bunching up under the needle plate.


  • Raise presser foot when upper threading.
  • Thread normally through all guides
  • Lower presser foot
  • Thread needle, leaving a 6" thread tail
  • Raise foot and gently pull thread (no tension)
  • Lower foot & gently pull thread (you'll feel resistance)
  • Delint upper tension with Compressed Dry Canned Lint Remover ie: Computer Quality. Be sure no thread is in machine and foot is up so tension is released
Nancy Notions Trusted by sewing enthusiasts for more than 3 decades

Jul 13, 2015 | Baby Lock Ellure

1 Answer

My machine will sew fine for a few minutes and then the tension will go loose and the bobbin thread will leave long threads for a while and then the threads knots up in a big bunch. It doesn't matter how...


It could be your top threading, your thread tangled, or your thread is old. Try different thread and do this test, with the presser foot up, pull the top thread, it should move smoothly, now put the presser foot down, pull the thread and it should barely move. This usually seats the thread in the tension discs. If, that doesn't do it, insert a new needle.

Dec 23, 2010 | Brother CS-6000

1 Answer

Sewing machine sews the first stitch and then needle comes unthread


It probably is your threading, rethread, then with the presser foot up, pull on the thread, it should feed smoothly, now put the presser foot down, pull thread again, it should barely move. Sometimes that seats the thread in the tension discs. Check your tension, mine is set at 3 and leave enough of a thread tail, 3-4 inches. Hope this helps.

Nov 15, 2010 | Brother LS-2125 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

Hi, I'm trying to sew a silky fabric and the stitches on the bottom keep getting jumbled and the top thread breaks


My guess is that you have lost all of your upper tension and you may have your needle in backward.
Unthread the machine.
Raise the presser foot. Turn the handwheel until the take-up lever is at it's highest position. Set the upper tension dial/knob to 5. Remove the needle and replace it making sure that the flat side of the needle shank is to the back. Thread the machine.
With the presser foot up, the upper thread should pull through easily and then grab when the presser foot is lowered.
Test sew.
The upper tension pulls the stitches up and the lower tension pulls the stitches down. When they pull properly, the stitch is even.

Oct 29, 2010 | Husqvarna Huskystar 215 Sewing Machine

6 Answers

The bottom thread gets all knotted up when I sew... everything locks up and there is a mess of thread on the underside of what I'm trying to sew. help?


The tension in the top thread is controlled by a dial, and the tension in the bottom thread is controlled by a small screw on a spring on the bobbin. The tensions are supposed to be exactly equal in order to make the stitch perfectly in the middle of the cloth. Uneven tension will pull the stitch up or down from there. You can tug on each thread to feel how much tension there is. Often the bottom will get too much tension by just inserting the bobbin upside down. Leave the bobbin door open, and watch the operation. The top thread is pulled down around the bobbin. See if it is getting caught on anything?

Dec 18, 2009 | Singer 3116 Simple

1 Answer

White 1620 will not maintain thread tension


Sounds like it could be thread, try this: Thread test
Test your thread quality to start, thread your machine and LIFT the presser foot (this opens the tension disks). Pull your top thread straight back. If you feel no tension no matter how much thread you pull, your thread is good. If that your machine passes that test, we can go to step 2. If not, try different spool of thread, do the same test until you get a smooth pull (tip: always check your thread this way when you thread your machine)
Step 2:
Pull on your threaded bobbin thread while it’s in the machine. Does it pull smooth and even? If so, go to step 3. If not, try a new bobbin (bobbins get bent or distorted if wound too tight).
Clean thoroughly in the hook and bobbin case area and oil 1-2 drop is all.

Mar 19, 2009 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Zig zag stitches are not holding


When ever a machine is jamming up the bobbin thread, it is a result of your top tension. It is either set to low (under 4), or the thread has come out of the take-up lever. Check your threading, fromt he spool pin, down to 2 and up to 3. Three is the take up lever. From the take-up lever down to 4. Set the thread behind the thread guide and thread the needle form front to back. Low quailtu thread 9dual duty or all purpose) can also create this problem.

thanks,

Bonnie

Aug 24, 2008 | Kenmore 15516 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

Thread breaking.


Rethread the machine following these directions:
all machines thread the same. TTN tension, take up, needle.
Beginning with the spool, guide the thread through the thread guides to the tension assembly. Pull the thread through the tension assembly and test it to make sure the tension is working correctly.
(To do this test, adjust your tension setting to normal or medium or 5 or something in the middle. Raise the presser foot and pull the thread through the tension. It should pull easily!! Lower the presser foot and pull the thread. It should pull noticeably harder.) If it passes this test, continue up through the take up lever,then down through the thread guides to the needle. Make sure your needle is fully inserted and turned the correct way.( If you load your bobbin case from the left side,the needle rule is normally FLAT to the RIGHT is RIGHT. There are some exceptions. If you have a newer style drop in bobbin or your bobbin case loads in the front then the rule is FLAT to the BACK.
Remove the bobbin case and bobbin. Pull on the bobbin thread to make sure it doesn't pull too hard. It should have some tension on it but not a lot. Insert the bobbin and bobbin case into the hook assembly and pull on the bobbin thread again.The tension should still be about the same. If it is tight, you need to look at the bottom of the pin that the bobbin case sits on and see if there are any threads looped around it. If there are , you need to remove them.
Hold the top thread , turn the hand wheel and see if the thread is catching someplace around the hook assembly. If it pulls the thread up easily, put some fabric in it and see how it works.
Make sure the thread is through the take up lever.
sewman7

Sewman7

Jul 09, 2008 | Euro-Pro Fast and Easy 420 Mechanical...

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