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Spackled walls but still leave marks

I repaneled my walls with plywood, no matter how many times I used wood filler I still can see seems any solutions

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Prime the Spackle before you paint it.

Posted on Feb 11, 2015

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Used filler for filling nail heads rubbed back next day perfect two weeks later painted wattyl undercoat water base and filler went soft


The wood filler, a water based product, pulled the water out of the latex paint and softened. To preclude this in the future, you can cover these repairs with shellac or another sealant to provide a barrier between the filler and the paint. Spray shellac is available in hardware stores, and is used on water stained ceilings before repainting.

May 20, 2015 | Timbermate Wood Filler Water Based 8-oz...

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Minor Drywall Repairs


<span>It takes about 4 days for a good patch to be made. You can buy the materials in small quantities at the hardware store, so it won't cost much at all for a small hole, and a little more for a larger one.<br /><br />For a hole smaller than a tennis ball, you can press newspaper crumpled loosely into a ball into the hole, as much as you need, to build the hole up to just below the surface, then cover with overlapping layers of drywall mesh tape. The directions for a larger hole follow, and you can skip the first parts of it if you do not need them (if you are using the newspaper method.). With this method (newspaper) the most important part is to remember that the first coat of spackling is just to anchor the tape and bridge the repair, no more.<br /><br />The easiest way to repair a larger hole in wall board:<br />1. Cut a piece of new wall board larger than the hole you want to repair.<br />2. Take your wallboard "patch and hold it over the hole. Draw the outline of the patch on the wall.<br />3. Using a drywall saw, cut out the outline of the patch on the wall.<br />4. Cut a piece of wood longer than the hole is tall, by about 4". Measure back from each end 2".<br />5. Start a drywall screw 1" above the patch outline, centered. Align the wood in the hole with the lines you made on it at 2" back from the ends. Screw the drywall screw into the wood. Do the same at the bottom. You'll want the drywall screw to be below the surface while trying not to break the paper surface of the drywall.<br />5. Fit your patching piece into the cavity, and, depending on how large the hole is screw through the patch and into the wood with one or two drywall screws.<br />5. Using self-adhesive drywall tape, tape the crack around the patch, overlapping at the corners.<br />6. Use pre-mixed drywall spackling with a 4" putty knife to apply the first coat of drywall spackling to the patch. The aim here is to secure the new drywall to the old, so you need to use the putty knife to press the spackling into the crack, and lightly coat the drywall tape. If your screws that were used to secure your wood to the back of the old drywall are outside of the tape, press the spackling into the screw dimples as well. If you hear a "ticking" sound as you pass over the screws with the spackling, the screw isn't set deep enough. Give it another turn or so, until you don't hear it tick when you pass over it with the knife. Let all of this dry for 24 hours. Clean your tools, and dry them.<br />7. The next day, sand any burrs that stick out, but sand lightly, trying to taper the patch out onto the old wall. Don't be too particular, as there is still a ways to go. Using the drywall knife and spackling, re-coat the patch, blending more onto the wall, and leaving a little more material in the mesh of the drywall tape. The cracks should be refilled, as they'll have shrunken in overnight, so this is all done at the same time. Don't over-work it, just give it a good coating, and leave it alone. The screws that you previously spackled will get another coating at this time as well. You're done for the day, clean and dry your tools.<br />8. The next day, lightly sand the burrs, again feathering a bit onto the wall. Try to remove the dust from sanding with a dry cloth, lightly brushing the patch and wall. This should be the final coat today. Lightly apply your spackling, feathering it out onto the wall. The aim here is to make the finished repair invisible to the eye, so feather out onto the wall at least the width of your blade, if possible. You can fill the screw holes again as needed, feathering the spackling out from the screw dimples onto the patch and wall. Done for the day. Clean and dry your tools.<br />9. Day 4. Sand the patch, feathering out from the patch and across the patch. It should appear relatively flat to the eye, with the cracks and screw holes filled and feathered. No tape should be sticking out. It will all appear smooth. It is ready for matching paint.<br />Hope that this was helpful.<br />Best regards, --W/D--</span>

on Feb 03, 2011 | Plumbing

1 Answer

I want to build a skate ramp, however I need to know how to bend the wood into position?


For all but the top layer the wood should be bent with the grain. It bends much easier this way. The basic technique is to screw the bottom of your plywood in place, and have your helper(s) walk slowly up the transition bending it and holding it down with their weight against the frame as they go. Then you, and possibly others work your way up screwing in one row at a time. It's important to have the plywood held flush against the transition framing by your helper(s) when you screw it in. If you rely on the screws to pull the plywood flush, they'll pull through the plywood, or pull the plywood out of place.

Jan 13, 2013 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

1 Answer

Removing plywood from floor fastened with screws


Use hole saw to drill around each screw.
Use as small size as possible.
When plywood sheet comes up, you will have plywood circles on floor held down with screws.
Put 2x4 block against each circle and bang with large hammer, or pry each with big bar.
The repair subfloor.

Oct 27, 2012 | Woods Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Does the wood really matters when it comes to coffee tables?


Hardwoods like oak, walnut, cherry or maple dent less easily than soft woods like pine and cedar. A "solid wood" table means it's made of solid boards. "All wood" tables are produced from engineered plywood or particleboard. I personally prefer the oak tables but it can get a bit pricy so you should take it into consideration.

Jul 31, 2012 | Furniture

2 Answers

I have several walls that have wall board but were not skim coated. When removing old wall paper; I gouged the wall in many places. How do I repair these areas so that I can now paint the walls. Also, what...


You can use redi-mix joint compound to fill in spots that need repair. I would lightly sand areas to be patched then wipe with damp rag.Stir joint compound till it's is well mixed then apply to damaged areas with sheetrock joint knife. Use a knife of the size as needed. They come in widths of 4 1/2 to 14 inches. If it is a shallow gouge then you can just use joint compound to repair it. Apply a layer so it is flush with surrounding surfaces and let dry. When it is fully dry it will be solid to the touch and pure white.The joint compound shrinks as it dries so if you had to apply a very thick layer you will have to repeat until it is completely full when dry. If you have very deep cracks or holes you may need to use drywall paper tape to reinforce repaired areas.Just apply a thick enough layer of joint compound to fill crack then lay piece of tape on it and wipe it several times with the taping knife.Let this dry then go over it two or three more times to slightly overfill. Let fully dry then sand to smooth and feather edges to macth. There is nothing hard about doing this it can just be time consuming. Most people make the mistake of putting too much joint compound on and then they spend hours sanding it back off.
If your repair areas are small use spackling compound. Big advantage on small spots is it dries quickly and doesn't require recoating.
When you are happy with surface to be painted you can use a water sealer such as thompsons water seal which works well but takes too long.I would recommend that you damp sponge walls and use 2 coats of interior latex primer. Let dry fully between coats then finish with two coats of semi-gloss interior latex. Hope this helps you.Thank you.

Feb 04, 2011 | Home

1 Answer

Fixture for curtainrail wentthroughplasterboardbig hole now help.me fix please


Hi, W/D here.

It takes about 4 days for a good patch to be made. You can buy the materials in small quantities at the hardware store, so it won't cost much at all for a small hole, and a little more for a larger one.

For a hole smaller than a tennis ball, you can press newspaper crumpled loosely into a ball into the hole, as much as you need, to build the hole up to just below the surface, then cover with overlapping layers of drywall mesh tape. The directions for a larger hole follow, and you can skip the first parts of it if you do not need them (if you are using the newspaper method.). With this method (newspaper) the most important part is to remember that the first coat of spackling is just to anchor the tape and bridge the repair, no more.

The easiest way to repair a larger hole in wall board:
1. Cut a piece of new wall board larger than the hole you want to repair.
2. Take your wallboard "patch and hold it over the hole. Draw the outline of the patch on the wall.
3. Using a drywall saw, cut out the outline of the patch on the wall.
4. Cut a piece of wood longer than the hole is tall, by about 4". Measure back from each end 2".
5. Start a drywall screw 1" above the patch outline, centered. Align the wood in the hole with the lines you made on it at 2" back from the ends. Screw the drywall screw into the wood. Do the same at the bottom. You'll want the drywall screw to be below the surface while trying not to break the paper surface of the drywall.
5. Fit your patching piece into the cavity, and, depending on how large the hole is screw through the patch and into the wood with one or two drywall screws.
5. Using self-adhesive drywall tape, tape the crack around the patch, overlapping at the corners.
6. Use pre-mixed drywall spackling with a 4" putty knife to apply the first coat of drywall spackling to the patch. The aim here is to secure the new drywall to the old, so you need to use the putty knife to press the spackling into the crack, and lightly coat the drywall tape. If your screws that were used to secure your wood to the back of the old drywall are outside of the tape, press the spackling into the screw dimples as well. If you hear a "ticking" sound as you pass over the screws with the spackling, the screw isn't set deep enough. Give it another turn or so, until you don't hear it tick when you pass over it with the knife. Let all of this dry for 24 hours. Clean your tools, and dry them.
7. The next day, sand any burrs that stick out, but sand lightly, trying to taper the patch out onto the old wall. Don't be too particular, as there is still a ways to go. Using the drywall knife and spackling, re-coat the patch, blending more onto the wall, and leaving a little more material in the mesh of the drywall tape. The cracks should be refilled, as they'll have shrunken in overnight, so this is all done at the same time. Don't over-work it, just give it a good coating, and leave it alone. The screws that you previously spackled will get another coating at this time as well. You're done for the day, clean and dry your tools.
8. The next day, lightly sand the burrs, again feathering a bit onto the wall. Try to remove the dust from sanding with a dry cloth, lightly brushing the patch and wall. This should be the final coat today. Lightly apply your spackling, feathering it out onto the wall. The aim here is to make the finished repair invisible to the eye, so feather out onto the wall at least the width of your blade, if possible. You can fill the screw holes again as needed, feathering the spackling out from the screw dimples onto the patch and wall. Done for the day. Clean and dry your tools.
9. Day 4. Sand the patch, feathering out from the patch and across the patch. It should appear relatively flat to the eye, with the cracks and screw holes filled and feathered. No tape should be sticking out. It will all appear smooth. It is ready for matching paint.
Hope that this was helpful.
Best regards, --W/D--

Feb 03, 2011 | Washing Machines

1 Answer

Can the hand-held shower hose be replace without accessing the plumbing underneath the tub? I can't figure out how to disconnect the existing hose from the diverter without cutting an opening under the...


No, you need to cut a hole. Usually an access panel is provided during the initial installation, either in the ceiling from downstairs or in the other side of the adjacent wall. But it's pretty easy to add one. After you cut a nice rectangular hole, you can cover it with a piece of painted plywood that has a trim piece attached to the plywood. The plywood is held in place with a couple of screws. When you remove the panel, the trim stays attached to the plywood. When you place the panel in the hole, the trim covers the gap between the drywall and the plywood.

Dec 01, 2010 | Grohe 25 597 Talia Tub Filler w/Personal...

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I have a 27 inch wall sleeve can a 26 inch friedrich unifit work?or do I need a 27 inch unit


the a/c units keep getting smaller, when unit replacement is slightly smaller , the extra space can be filled with a piece of plywood or rigid foam insulation with a thin layer of plywood, any edges seen from inside can be covered with trim, make sure the wood covers entire bottom layer of sleeve to properly support. or just find the larger unit if you can. hope this helps.

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1 Answer

Wood Lining to Folding camper is wet


the best solution is to remove the spongy wood and replace with marine plywood

one possible fix is to glue(liquid nails) 4x8 vinyl sheets(used for bathroom walls and ceilings) over the spongy wood you should also determine where the support ribs are located and use rust proof exterior ( like deck screws) and put a washer through the screw and screw through the vinyl and sponge wood into the rib/stud to secure the vinyl do this about every 10 inches on the supports

finally caulk the edges and seams and put a lattice type of slat(1inch wide by 3/8 thick by 8 ft long on all exposed seams

tools needed small gig saw variable speed drill
caulking gun

I

Sep 09, 2008 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

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