Question about APC 1500VA BX1500 8 Outlet UPS UPS System

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Overload light on

Check volt at ac plug on ups read 89vdc that with charge up battery pack

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Overload on ADP Back-UPS XS 900 with trivial load

Replace 24v dc small fan, it does not work!
You can buy a new one here
https://www.alliedelec.com/Search/ProductDetail.aspx?SKU=5920640&MPN=OD4010-24MB&R=5920640&SEARCH=5920640&DESC=OD4010-24MB

Posted on May 04, 2009

Geekman
  • 32281 Answers

SOURCE: I have a APC back-ups CS650 when i switch it on

Sounds like you have a inverter fault.

Posted on Nov 24, 2009

  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: SUA3000RMI2U won't carry load

Did you run this test without AC input?
Also what happens when you cut off the AC mains without any load connected to it? Will the UPS continue to run or does it switch off as well?

Posted on Dec 16, 2012

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1 Answer

Charging voltage to high, cooking batteries and head lights


Hi, Anonymous you may need a new voltage regulator the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Electrical issue and fault finding chart
Yamaha zeal 250 service manual
Manuals Data Zealous
OEM parts for Yamaha

Dec 02, 2012 | 2000 Yamaha FZX 250 Zeal

Tip

Xantrex inverter error codes


This information expands upon the error code information contained in the Link 2000 Owner?s Manual.
E-01 Inverter high DC/Battery voltage shutdown Battery voltage has risen above 15.5 VDC for 12-volt models or 31 VDC for 24-volt models.
E-02 Inverter low DC/Battery voltage shutdown Battery voltage has dropped below 10 VDC for 12-volt units or 20 VDC for 24-volt units.
E-03 Inverter or Charger overtemp shutdown Unit will reset automatically after it has cooled sufficiently.
E-04 Battery overload Caused by excessively discharged batteries. See section in inverter owner?s manual titled ?Charging overdischarged batteries.?
E-05 AC Backfeed AC power from an outside source has been fed to the AC output of the inverter. Potentially damaging to the unit. Disconnect incoming AC power and correct the situation.
E-06 Electronic Overload Inverter overload caused by too large a load or a short circuit. Reset by cycling power switch or connecting incoming AC power.
E-07 Triac control error Triac has overheated. Shut down unit and allow to cool.
E-08 High battery voltage shutdown during charge mode Check all charging sources for proper voltage. Reset by cycling the power switch.
E-09 Spare
E-10 Link 2000 de-powered This indicates that power was removed and restored to the Link 2000.
E-11 Spare
E-12 Battery #1 voltage sense leads open Blue wire is not connected to battery #1.
E-13 Battery #2 voltage sense leads open Violet wire is not connected to battery #2. E-14 Inappropriate Charged V selected for sensed voltage This value defaults to 13.2 for a 12-volt system, 26.4 for a 24-volt system. If this setting is above the voltage limits of the charging source, this error code will be displayed. Please refer to page 9 of the Link 2000 Owner?s Manual
E-15 Incoming AC polarity reversed Check incoming AC wiring for a reverse polarity condition.
CCC Indicates battery being charged. Displayed when Time remaining is selected. LO BAT More than 50% of declared capacity of battery 1 or battery 3 has been consumed.
OL Meter reading out of range U xx Designates a user setup CEF. Please read the sections pertaining to CEF on pages 19?22. A Designates Alternator output current on a Link 2000-R. is a number from 1?200. P Indicates Percent of charge mode selected. is a number from 1?100.

on May 14, 2015 | Xantrex Technology Electronics - Others

1 Answer

03 wr 250 is blowing light bulbs


Hi, Dean the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
2004 wr250f blowing bulbs
03 WR450 lights blowing
YAMAHA WR250F Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-wr-owners-manuals

Nov 08, 2012 | 2003 Yamaha WR 250 F

1 Answer

New battery wont stay charged


Hi Anonymous, perform the following tests:
1. Fill acid type batteries to proper levels.
2. Charge battery overnight at 1-2 amps you need 12.5 volts or better after charging.
3. Hook up battery positive cable, then with your multimeter on the milliamp scale connect one lead to the negative battery post and the other lead to the ground cable. Meter should read 3 milliamps or less, 10 milliamps with a radio, 15 milliamps with radio and CB. If your meter reads higher you need to isolate the circuit by pulling fuses and circuit breakers one at a time and observe meter for drop in aprerage then get out your test light and track down the short in that circuit.
3. Make sure all connections are clean and tight especially the negative cable at both ends.
4. Hook up volt meter to battery and start engine, if meter falls below 9.5 v while cranking replace battery.
5. With engine running at 3600 RPM battery should read 14.3-14.7 volts if not continue tests.
6. Unplug voltage regulator from alternator at crankcase by front of primary cover.
7. To test voltage regulator go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F8EjV0IjW9Q
8. With ohm meter, one lead grounded, touch alternator pin meter should read infinity, if not replace stator.
9. With ohm meter, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read 0.1 to 0.2 ohms on 1989 and later models. 0.2 to 0.4 ohms 1988 and earlier models, if not replace stator.
10. With volt meter set on AC scale, both leads touching alternator pins meter should read
16 to 20 volts AC for every 1000 RPM'S 1989 and later and 19 to 26 volts AC for every 1000 RPMS. If not replace rotor.
17. For a free wiring diagram please visit the website below and good luck.
Harley Davidson Wiring Diagrams and Schematics

Jul 05, 2012 | 1979 Harley Davidson XLH 1000 Sportster

1 Answer

Battery not charging on 1992 stcfx


To check the charging system, you need a DVOM (Digital Volt Ohm Meter). Make sure the battery is fully charged or you'll get a bad reading. With the battery fully charged, connect the meter "across" the battery but connecting the meter's red lead to the positive battery post and the black lead to the battery negative post. Put the meter's function selection switch in DC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Your meter should read 14.5 to 15.0 volts.

If it does not, you need to check the alternator output. Find the plug in the lower front of the engine case where the regulator wires plug into the engine. Unplug the plug and look into the engine side of the plug. There are two metal contacts inside the plug. These metal plugs are where we are going to put our meter probes to test the output. Put on probe on each metal plug. It makes no difference which probe goes where just don't let them touch the engine case or each other. Put the meter's function selector switch in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE . Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Touch the meter probes to the two metal plugs in the engine case. Your meter should read 30 volts or greater.

If the alternator does not read thirty volts, make sure you meter is in the AC VOLT scale and you've got good contact on the metal plugs in the engine. If you still don't read at least 30 volts, you stator is bad and must be replaced. If you 30 volts or more but you don't have the 14 volts at the battery, the regulator is probably bad. Make sure the regulator is grounded properly.

Good luck
Steve

Mar 17, 2011 | Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard...

1 Answer

I have a HP 6735s Laptop. I have been getting a few of the "Smart AC Power Output" messages, however yesterday after I turned my laptop off and then on again, the laptop wouldn't detect the AC...


bad battery,
you do know that the main batteries are "love to fail"
right,
just about all batteries do that in everything,
even the coin cell,inside can fail in 5years flat.

if power pack is 19vdc with volt meter, good !
the battery is next, yes it runs pc but can be bad.
a bad battery can still have power but overloads the charger chip
it really is an analog world. (reality)
if savvy , always keep a spare battery for moments like this.

Apr 07, 2017 | HP Compaq 6735s Notebook

1 Answer

I just purchased yesterday and found recall notice in upper tour pack. The battery was low charged over night and am going to check voltage and amps at battery while running today. What are the telltail...


With the battery fully charged, use a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check the output of the charging system. Connect it across the battery, red meter lead to positive, black meter lead to negative. Put the meter's function switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT range. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle of about 1500-2000 RPM. The meter should read 14.5 to 15.0 volts.

If the meter does not read correctly, unplug the regulator where it enters the front of the engine case. You'll be measuring the AC voltage at the engine case side of the plug. Put your meter's function switch in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT range. Put one meter lead into one metal contact in the plug and the other lead into the other metal contact in the plug. Makes no difference which lead goes to which metal contact. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. You should read 30 volts or better.

If you do not read 30 volts at the engine, your stator is bad. If you have 30 volts or more at the engine but low voltage at the battery, your regulator is probably bad. This is a simple test and it's accuracy is about 90% or so.

Good Luck
Steve

Oct 31, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

2 Answers

Battery will not charge


To check your charging system, first, you must have a fully charged battery in the bike. Start the bike up and using a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) put the red lead on the positive post and the black lead on the negative post. Put the meter in DC Volts, 50 volt range. Idle the bike up a bit and you should read about 14.5 to 14.8 volts.

If you don't get anymore than 12.6 volts at the battery. Go to the left side of the engine and pull the connector for the stator at the front of the engine. Put your meter in AC volts, 50 volt range. Touch one meter lead to one pin and the other to the other pin. It makes no difference which lead goes where just don't allow the lead to touch the engine case. Your meter should read 25-35 Volts AC at this point. Notice the AC, not DC, voltage at the stator. Make sure your meter is in DC at the battery test and AC at the stator test. If you have less than 15 volts at the stator, your stator is bad. If the voltage is where it should be at the stator, you voltage regulator is probably bad.

Good Luck
Steve

May 29, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

1 Answer

1990 FLSTC. Lights are dim and trouble starting. When running it wants to die and runs rough>


It sounds like you've got a charging system problem. To check this, first you must charge your battery fully. Take the seat off the bike, two large bolts on either side of the seat. Then with a fully charged battery, start the bike. Using Digitial Volt Ohm meter, put the red lead of the meter to the positive terminal of the battery and the black lead to the negative terminal. Put the meter in 50 volt DC range. The voltage should start out at about 12.5 volts and slowly build up to nearly 14.5-15.0 volts. If it does not, something is wrong.

Now, down on the engine on the left side near the end of your oil filter there is a connector plug. Disconnect this plug and you'll see two pins down inside the plug in the engine case. Put your meter in the AC 50 range. This is the stator of your alternator and the output is Alternating Current, thus the AC setting on your meter. Now, start the bike and bring it to a fast idle. Put one lead from the meter to either pin and the other lead to the other pin. It makes no difference which pin since its AC current. You should read at least 20 volts. Typically it reads somewhere between 25-30 Volts AC depending on how fast your engine is running. If this checks right, your alternator stator is good.

Check the plug that you unplugged from the engine case. Make sure the sockets up inside the rubber plug are clean and that they make good contact with the pins. Check the ground on your regulator. I like to put one of those "star" lockwashers between the regulator and the frame of the bike on each bolt to insure the regulator has a good ground. Also, if you don't already have one, buy yourself one of those clips that holds the plug together when it's plugged in. I've seen the back out and not make contact while the engine is running.

Now that you know your alternator is good and your regulator is properly plugged in, run the first test again. If the test still shows a low voltage at the battery, replace the regulator. But, you MUST use a fully charged battery to do this test otherwise you'll get a low reading. Good Luck

Jan 18, 2010 | 2005 Harley Davidson FLSTC - FLSTCI...

2 Answers

B&D 400W Inverter won`t run my laptop


even the smallest inverter can run a laptop, something is wrong with this unit

Jul 25, 2009 | Black & Decker 1000w Power Inverter

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