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Low voltage can I use a 3.6 volt lithium

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I would think the batteries need to be change.
You need to refer to your product documentation for assistance.

Posted on Dec 31, 2013

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2 Answers

Voltage chart


anything less than 3 volts, they are cheap on Ebay or amazon, i do not buy them local anymore, I can get 25 for the price of 1.

Jun 25, 2014 | Maxell Varta Electronic Battery CR 2032 3...

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I had a power failure, wiyh power off about 6 hours. Since power ws restored, I hav a low battery alarm for about 3 days. The system is about 11 years old. It currently has a hard-wired rechargeable...


> Since power ws restored, I hav a low battery alarm for about 3 days.
The charge circuit probably only supplies a tiny charge current to prevent overcharging of the main battery and I suspect the original is a NiCad and has likely lost a cell or two (shorted; it's common with them) over that fairly long period.
Replacing it with either Lithium Ion or NiMh rechargeables with a honest voltage rating (*some aren't) is a good move; neither of these are as prone to failure as NiCad is. Don't be surprised if you still have a 'low battery' alert for several days since these batteries rarely have a full charge when shipped.
*So-called '9V' block batteries are, except for rare batteries, actually 8.4 or even only 7.2 volts. I have some instruments that indicate 'Low battery' with either of these even when fully charged.

Apr 08, 2011 | GE Iti Simon Burglar Alarm Home Security...

1 Answer

I tried using 3 AA NiMH batteries (total DC V=4.2, 1600mA) as a backup/charger for my HP Ipaq 612c battery. I inserted a resistor (4.7 ohms) in the circuit to reduce the current. The red light charging...


Hello,

You built one of these too, eh?

Yes, there can be a problem doing this. First off, 3 AA batteries does not equal 4.2 volts, they are 1.2volt nominal so 3 * 1.2 = 3.6volts. When they are just off the charger, terminal voltage will be closer to 1.5v, so 1.5*3 = 4.5 volts.

Using ohms law, E=I * R, we can find your current as I = E / R or I = 4.5v / 4r7 as .95Amps (almost a full amp) that you would see worst case. The resistor is doing nothing for you.

The reason that the charge light blinks intermittently is because the charge controller (lithium battery, right?) is pulsing due to low voltage.

Try this: Take *6*, yes, 6, AA batteries, your choice of chemistry, and put them in series. That will give you a nominal (alkaline) voltage of 9v. Connect a low dropout 5v regulator such as an LT1117-5. Then you will be able to use your battery backup much more effectively.

On a different note, I used 4xAA (NiMH) and powered my ipaq 3650 directly. Worked great. Your mileage may vary though.

Aug 27, 2010 | Cell Phones

1 Answer

Nimh batteries give low batt signal even when


the trouble with rechargable batteries is their voltage is low to start with even when charged. they only give 1.2 volts each instead of 1.5 volts from proper AA bateries. I use Energizer Lithiums in all my camers and they are great and last a long time. You can find cheap suppliers on eBay I use a site called 7dayshop.com in jersey (europe).

Jul 25, 2010 | Olympus FE-25 Digital Camera

1 Answer

GE Simon says that the smoke alarm has a low battery. Replaced the batteries, and still receive the same alert. ???


I know some of this sounds obvious but the problem is usally related to 1 of 3 things.

1 Battery oreintation is wrong
2 Replacement batteries were old and were already below the low battery threshold (1.35 volts per battery/ 2.7 volts combined)
3 Didn't use the correct battery - manufacturer recommends lithium batteries (quality alkilines will work but they will have a shorter life)

Beyond this I will need more information to diagnose the issue.

Mar 19, 2010 | GE Security Simon 3 Wireless Home Security...

1 Answer

What is the voltage number of the battery for a


The battery that is supposed to be used in there is the cr1/3n sometimes called cr13n.
It is a 3 volt lithium battery. 11mm Height x 11.6mm Diameter

In a pinch some folks have had success using 2 stacked lr44 batteries which are the same diameter, but half the height and half the voltage.

You should use the lithium battery.

Good Luck!

Sep 12, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I have a GE Simon System .. It's about 5 years old. My front door sensor keeps saying low battery even though I've replaced the battery, twice. Any ideas ?


Make sure the battery is exactly what you need. If it is a lithium battery you need to verify the volts - it won't work unless it is exactly the right one. Replacing the lithium battery with one that looks the same won't work if the voltage is different.

If you are using AA or AAA's make sure all dust is removed from the sensor and the batteries are in place properly.


Aug 12, 2009 | GE Security Simon 3 Wireless Home Security...

1 Answer

Toshiba Satellite M35 CMOS battery Voltage?


Most CMOS batteries are button lithium batteries with a voltage of 3.0 volts. Anything less than 2.9 volts should be replaced.

Mar 31, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Zen shuts off after only playing a few songs


How long have you been doing this for (months)? You may have already drastically reduced the life of your battery

Battery
& Charging

The Zen’s battery:

The Zen uses a 3.7v rated Lithium-Ion rechargeable battery. A 3.7v rated Lithium-ion battery actually gets charged to around 4.2v with a tolerance of +/- .05v. A charge of 3.7v/3.8v is actually about a 50% SoC. At 3.3v, lithium-ion batteries have typically only utilized 70% of its 100% charge capacity.

Charging Voltage = 4.2v (4.1v)
Nominal Open-Circuit Voltage = 3.7v (3.6v)

A note on Over-Discharging and Over-Charging:

In general, Lithium-Ion batteries do not like to be overcharged (usually above 4.2v) or excessively discharged (under 2.5v-3.0v). If a Lith-ion battery falls below 1.5v, then typically you shouldn't try to recharge it at all for "safety" concerns. A fully discharged lithium-ion battery causes the formation of copper shunt in the cell which begins to get extremely hot when attempting to recharge. A lithium-ion battery should not be charged above 4.3 volts. Above 4.3 volts and the cell causes lithium metal plating on the anode. The cathode material becomes an oxidizing agent and loses stability and begins releases oxygen. This can cause the battery to heat up. Lithium-ion cells should never get above 130°C (265°F). At 150°C (302°F) the cell becomes thermally unstable and can eventually lead to a thermal runaway. These are the safety reasons why the low and high voltage cut-off and temperature sensing circuits are used. If the internal temperature of the battery gets to high, the temperature sensing circuit can initiate a mechanical pressure switch that will permanently cut-off the current path and prevent anymore charging.

How do you charge the Zen (Battery)?

It can be charged by connecting it to a USB port on a computer or by using an AC Wall Charger within the Zen's charging specs (see below).

Can I use my cell phone's AC Charger to charge my Zen?

I believe the max input voltage of the Zen is around 5v. Most devices that can charge or run off the USB host power can handle the max 5v of USB ports. 4.2 volts is usually the max Lithium ion batteries are charged to. It is usually around when the high voltage circuit is triggered and stops the charging of the battery. I would not connect a charger to the Zen that puts out more volts then 5v with an output current beyond 2400mA (2.4A) to be safe.

When and how often to charge?

To be safe, I would avoid frequent full discharges because this puts additional strain on the battery and usually shortens its life. Partial discharges with frequent recharges are better than one deep one. Recharging a partially charged lithium-ion does not cause harm because there is no "memory effect" like with older type Ni-Cd (nickel-cadmium) batteries.

Do I need to charge the Zen for hours before I use it for the first time?

With Lith-Ion batteries, the first charge isn't any different then any other charge. There is no technical need to fully charge it the first time you get it other then the fact of being able to use it longer since it will have a full charge. They are not like other types of previously used rechargeable batteries that needed the full charge at first. Most likely by the time you get everything all figured out and loaded onto the device, the battery would be fully charged anyway.

Please note: I do recommend that you at least connect the Zen to a computer while it has sufficient charge on the battery in order to properly be detected and have its devices drivers load properly. In other words, don't use your new Zen for a period of time to where you drain enough power from the battery to just come on and turn off automatically or to the point the Zen doesn't come on at all. If you do, then you may have detection and charging issues when you go to connect the Zen to the computer.

How long will the battery in the Zen last?

Lithium-Ion batteries have a life span of about 300-500 discharge/charge cycles or 2-3 years from being manufactured.

Storing or not using the Zen for long periods of time:

Lithium-ion batteries (by themselves) with no built-in voltage monitoring circuit have a really low self-discharge rate (1-2% a month) when not being used. Having the addition of voltage monitoring circuits will slightly increase the discharge rate, but should not reach the point of excessively discharging the battery to where it won't turn back on unless sitting unused for an extended period of time and if its last state before powering off was a already in a low voltage state. So, as long as you aren't storing it for long periods of time at a low discharged voltage, the battery should be ok to recharge.

Accidently left the Zen plugged into the Computer all night or for a long period of time:

I wouldn’t make a habit of doing so. Long term usage like that could shorten the life of the battery. Although you may be fine for a while, leaving it plugged in occasionally all day and night, most likely won't hurt it, but leaving it plugged in every day and night may not be a good idea. Although once it is charged to 100%, the battery's internal high voltage cut-off circuit should keep the battery from over-charging and the devices charging circuit should keep applying a trickle charge when detected a drop in charge below full. However, keeping a Lithium-ion battery plugged in and fully charged keeps the battery's temperature elevated. Exposure to prolonged elevated temperatures can cause capacity loss which can then cause the battery to no longer be able to charge or hold a charge. Plus, it may be a small chance, but there is a chance that exposure to this condition for long periods could also increase the chance of a circuit failure (charging, high voltage, temperature sensing) and allow for a severe over-charge to take place to the point of thermal runaway which has been known to cause the occasional "exploding" battery, but in most cases just melt (and take some of the device with it) or catch fire.

A note regarding USB and charging:

Per the USB specs:
USB 1.1 = Minimum supply voltage is 4.4v
USB 2.0 = Minimum supply voltage is 4.75v
Both maximum supply voltages are 5.25v and a current of 500mA.

Before the USB bus interface can begin charging a device (Zen), it must return a device identifier to the hub driver (or device driver). Once the hub driver has the returned information from the device (like power requirements, supported transfer speeds, etc.), it can then begin charging the device based on those retuned values. This process is called Enumeration. Until enumeration has completed, it may not draw more than 100mA from the bus. Once enumeration has completed, it can then begin drawing up to the 500mA allowed by the USB bus.

Jun 23, 2008 | Creative Labs Zen Digital Media Player

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