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Can't focus in on objects

Trying to see birds about 100 to 150 feet away tried both lenses can.t focus in

Posted by Anonymous on

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

CRTN
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SOURCE: Pictures out of center

No My Sons Does The Same Thing These Things Are Junk Sorry.

Posted on Jan 05, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Canon AF Issues

Change from auto focus to manual focus or focus using only one focal square and change the setting to One Shot. You may need to shoot in Manual (M) mode though. Any of the "auto" modes will not let you.

Posted on Apr 07, 2009

ipodslinger
  • 688 Answers

SOURCE: Auto focusing not working, Lenses don't rotate at all

i did some research on this problem and one of the things mentioned was that there may be a firmware update to address an autofocus problem with this camera.
Here is a page that may help you get the firmware update.
http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&tabact=SupportDetailTabAct&fcategoryid=215&modelid=17779#DownloadDetailAct

also another thing you may want to do to alleviate this problem is to reset your camera settings to the default setting and try it.

Good Luck

Posted on Jun 02, 2009

SOURCE: can focus near not far

Try using the eyepiece with the largest number written on it -- do not use the 2x barlow... just the eyepiece.

Posted on Jul 11, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Object looks like out of focus

Did you find a solution yet? I have the same problem.
A.

Posted on Aug 12, 2009

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The auto focus does not work properly with this lens on either my Nikon D5000 or D7000. I have tried all possible combinations of AF settings. Typicaly, when I use single point to focus, the subject I...


Hi, It wouldn't autofocus on the D5000 as the body doesn't have an auto focus motor in the body and since that lens is AF, not AF-S, it won't autofocus. It should autofocus on the D7000 though, how far away are you from the object you're trying to photograph?

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What is the lense for taking a profetional picture from crafts (indoor)


By "crafts", do you mean things like figurines or models?

Most any lens (other than fisheyes or super-wide-angle) will work so long as the object is within the lens' focusing range.

If you need to shoot up close, you will either need close-focus filters (basically screw-on magnifying lenses) or a lens with "macro" capability. Other lenses typically cannot focus on objects closer than about two feet to the camera.

It also helps to have decent lighting, which cannot be controlled with the camera alone.

Apr 12, 2011 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

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The distance focus ring, is it supposed to turn all the way to the macro symbol when you are focusing on a subject that is very close?


If you're right "on top" of the subject - then, yes - it should indicate "macro". Macro focusing is for "very up close" photography and is exactly as you describe. You simply physically move the camera a little closer to or further from the subject to focus.

Not all lenses are capable of macro focusing. The vast majority of these non-macro lenses are required to be at least a couple (or more) feet away to focus. Macro lenses on the other hand can usually get just inches away - which is a great capability.

Enjoy your macro lens!

Oct 12, 2010 | Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5 -5.6 USM Lens

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My microscope won't focus, i tried everything...i don't know what is wrong with it...it's brand new.. it worked a couple times but now it just stopped.. i dont know what brand it is...all it says is...


If your stage is still in its correct orientation then make sure your objective lenses are screwed in tight as well as the eye piece being secured correctly. Try using different objectives (don't go too high or you may damage your lenses if you ram it into your specimen) and using the fine and course focus. If the you still cant focus using different objectives it's quite possible that your mirrors or lenses inside the microscope have been knocked loose. I would then recommend only having it repaired by a certified microscope technician. If it is still under warranty take it back to the store of purchase or send it back to the manufacturer.

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I own a Canon 100 - 400 mm IS and mostlyl use it for bird photography. My problem is that the focusing of the lens is not very consistent. For example, when I was shooting a great egret somewhere between...


Which camera body do you own? It is the camera that determines where to focus and when you are in focus or not. I have 3 Canon film bodies and two digital. On all, the camera can be set to detect focus using all or a specific focus point visible in your viewfinder. Check how you have the camera set and choose ONE focus point. place this focus point on your most critical item in the image, in the case of your birds, the HEAD of the bird, press your shutter button half way to lock exposure and focus, then shift the aim to compose your image before pressing the rest of the way to make the exposure.

For birds, on my digital cameras, I choose to go into live preview mode, zoom in to 10x magnification and manually focus. This eliminates the camera not knowing what I want in focus.

try using a tripod to steady the shot, and do not forget that Canon states you should turn off the IS when the lens is used in conjunction with a tripod. From firsthand experience, I agree with this instruction, often when stable on a tripod, the IS can actually be trying to correct for its own movement and cause a degradation in image focus.

Good luck

Jan 02, 2010 | Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 IS USM Lens

1 Answer

I bought these for my husband. In trying them


Difficult to answer specifically without knowing the model. But binoculars are designed to view objects in the distance. They all have a limit as to how close they will focus based on the magnification and design. Objective lenses that are far apart such as on a porro prism binocular will not focus very close. The nature of the design of having the objectives further apart than the eyepieces doesn't allow it. When trying to focus too close the image will appear blurred and double. That is the nature of the design. 9 feet or 3 metres is considered quite close to focus a binocular and is usually for a model designed to do this such as a roof prism where the objective lens and the eye lenses are inline. A specialty binocular such as the Pentax Papilo will close focus to 50 centimeters. It has been designed so that the objective (large lenses) lenses converge.

Take into account when focusing that binoculars are also designed to compensate for differences in each eye. One of the eyepieces either right or left will adjust seperately. For binoculars with a center focus ring. First focus using the center ring with one eye covered. The eye that should be covered is the one that doesn't have the adjusting eyepiece. When the image is clear close the eye you have just used and leave the center focus alone. Focusing on the same spot look through the eyepiece that adjusts and turn the eyepiece ring until the image is clear. Now all you have to do is focus using the center ring only as the binoculars are adjusted for each eye.

Some binoculars do not have a center focus and each eye will adjust seperately.

Jul 29, 2009 | Optics

1 Answer

I need instructions for minolta freedom zoom 70 exI want to know what macro does.


Hi. As a pro photographer, I can tell you what 'macro' does on all cameras or lenses. 'Macro' focusing is for focusing on close objects, say an inch or two from the lens to a couple of feet. It is for closeup shots, say ants, or a fly, or someone's eye, raindrops on glass, etc. Try it out sitting on a patterned countertop or table or tablecloth to give you an idea, focusing far away and up close.
As far as the manual, there doesn't seem to be anything on the official site unfortunately. Good luck and have fun.
http://gi.konicaminolta.us/index.asp

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Blurry, AF not working


Try resetting the camera to it factory condition ..... also open lens and clean the contacts...and then try

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I just found my husbands old Minolta maxxum 5 AF Zoom lens camera. I don't know how to zoom in. I am trying to take close ups of my infant and it appears that I can only zoom in on objects 4 feet away....


It's not the fault of the camera itself, it's a lens issue. Zoom lenses can only get so close before the min focus is obtained. Unless you have a macro lens (not suited for portraits, which can focus down to mere inches. Most zooms aren't really designed for close focusing though there are higher end lenses that can be less than 1.5 feet.

Hope this helps!

Aug 31, 2008 | Cameras

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