Question about Danby DKC645BLS Compact Beverage Cooler

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Beer taste funny

I feel like my first couple of beers for the night always has a funny taste. Almost like c02 is getting through the line, but i cant find a leak.

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  • Expert
  • 51 Answers

Have you cleaned the pipes lately? you may have a build up of yeast in the supply pipe. There will be a cleaning procedure in the manual.

Posted on Dec 29, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Too much foam

I also have a Danby with the same problem. Apparently it is not the CO2 that is the problem. It is the fact that the temp of the beer in the lines near the faucet is too warm which causes a really frothy foam when poured out under pressure.

There is an extensive string at www.micromatic.com on how to fix the problem. In my opinion people took the fixes to the extreme but if you read the posts from beginning to end you can find two or three simple fixes that you can try that, from what I read, are effective, cheap and easy to complete.

You DO NOT want to go the route of turning down your CO2 pressure because you will be left with a keg of flat beer. Learn from my experience of about 12 gallons of flat Moosehead. I turned my pressure down to about 5PSI which took care of the foam but made the rest of the keg go flat. That solution took care of the head problem permanently, but not in a good way :)

Posted on Feb 19, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Danby Beer Keg dispenser fridge.

Draught (or Draft) beer is almost always un-pasteurized and therefore is more fragile. It should be consumed after being "tapped", and is generally truer to the flavors of the ingredients as pasteurization exposes the beer to heat and changes the flavor profile. Always use brewery approved beer line if you want to have foam free fresh tasting beer. Serving it through a plastic tube from the hardware or discount store or the plain vinyl tubing in your beer tap system you will wind up with a foamy, off tasting beer. Real draught beer is not pasteurized. It must be kept refrigerated between 35F. and 44F. A beer will become wild, turn sour and cloudy in a day or two. Below 44F. a keg of draught beer should last 20-30 days before it loses it's fresh brewery taste and aroma. Craft beers (micro brews) tend to have a shorter shelf life and you should contact the brewery for their recommendations. Why does my beer foam up? The 3 most often causes of beer foaming up are: The temperature of the beer keg The balance of the draught beer system pressures The cleanliness of the draught beer system I would suggest that you clean or replace the beer transport tube...

Posted on Aug 20, 2007

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: new danby kegerator - tastes like rubber hose

There is a check valve inside the coupler of the danby kegs that cause this problem. The valve is mainly there to prevent beer from back-flowing when changing the keg. Next time you change your keg check for a little black plastic retainer and also a small white plastic ball inside the coupler. Remove those (or just smell it) and you should notice that this is the taste/smell your beer has. I removed mine after this discovery, and there isn't any issues with the taste/smell since. I've heard this is a common issue with the Danby D coupler systems. Also, you won't have any issues with beer backflow when you change the keg, provided the line going to the tap is empty (which usually is if keg is kicked).

Posted on Feb 18, 2009

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Beer system won't pour properly


Most of the time this reason is the beer temp and co2 is not right. first you dont go buy box temp but need to get beer temp. first make sure you have a calibrated thermometer. check your thermometer by mixing up a glass of ice and water let it stand a couple Min to achieve 32deg. put thermometer in water let stand 2 min to make sure it reads 32 deg. now draw a couple of glasses of beer in the same cup pour each in a pitcher. now draw a 3rd glass of beer in the same glass put the thermometer in it you wont the beer at 38 deg if to cold turn your box thermostat up or if to hot turn your box thermostat down to achieve a 38 deg beer. now it is time to check the CO2 pressure, you wont it at 12 psi. first drink a couple glasses with your friends this will let your keg pressure equalize. Now it is time to do a test poor. If the faucet gives a spurt of foam when you open it or the beer runs foamy-clear-foamy-clear than the pressure is too low, bump the pressure up 2 LB and let the pressure equalize a few min. If the beer runs to fast, turn off the co2 at the shut off where the tubing connects to the regulator (Always turn off the shut off when adjusting the regulator). Release some pressure from the keg by pulling the pressure relief valve on the keg coupler. Drop the co2 pressure 2 lbs. Turn the co2 line back on and let the pressure equalize. Often you can tell if the pressure is too low by looking at the beer line at where it connects at the keg coupler. If you see bubbles rising up the beer line from the coupler the pressure is to low or the seal on the keg or coupler is bad. Over many years of trouble shooting 3/16" bore shanks and fittings can cause a burst effect releasing carbonation from the liquid. The beer flow looks good but you end up with a glass half full of beer and half foam. For this reason 1/4" bore shanks and fittings should always used on the liquid side.

Mar 04, 2014 | Scotsman Kitchen Appliances - Others

1 Answer

Can I use distilled water to brew beer? I dont like drinking the water where I live so I usually use distilled water but was not sure if it would work with beer.


I wouldn't brew beer with distilled water. It doesn't contain all the minerals you need for a good taste in beer. You could always use bottled water.

Feb 21, 2013 | Crafts & Hobbies

1 Answer

Is it necessary to keep cleaning and sanitizing the equipment when you homebrew beer?


Yes! If you want your beer to taste good and not have 'beer swill' which tastes horrible - you should clean and sanitize your equipment really carefully after each brewing session.

Feb 21, 2013 | Crafts & Hobbies

1 Answer

What is the shelf-life of beer?


Beer does not spoil in the same ways as other drinks. When a beer spoils, the taste characteristics change, not so much the texture. Most beers retain their quality for about 6 months. If stored properly, it should still taste good for an additional 4-6 months.

Feb 03, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

2 Answers

Do canned beers taste different from bottled beers?


Essentially, no. Some people may argue this statement, but basically what they taste is the aluminum. Try pouring the beer into a glass - it will taste the same. Cans are a great way to store beer; however they are not often used due to the cost surrounding their manufacturing process.

Feb 03, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

1 Answer

Foamy beer


Keg's are normally pressurized at 13 psi. If you only set yours at 8 psi then you are going to cause problems. You should always start at least the same psi that the keg is set to. If you can talk to the keg company as they all differ some. Common problem is to lower the psi which will cause foam until you reach about 1/2 full or a little less then you should get less foam but your beer will become very flat. Too much pressure is usually better than too little, even with too much pressure you'll see the beer come out fine but will start to foam when hitting the glass/pitcher. Also note that the coupler's that Danby use are very cheap, check the CO2 vale (between CO2 line and coupler) to see if there are any cracks or anything.

Sep 27, 2008 | Danby DKC646BLS Full Size / Pony Beer Keg...

1 Answer

Put together


1 Chrome Rail (for attachment to Worktop)
4 Self-Tapping Screws (to attach chrome rail)
1 CO2 Cylinder Support Stand
1 CO2 Cylinder (empty)
1 CO2 Regulator (high/low pressure gauges)
1 CO2 Air Line Hose (red)
2 CO2 Air Line Hose Connectors (black)
1 Beer Keg Coupler
1 Beer Tower Unit (complete with faucet, hose and wing nut)
1 Rubber Washer (to be installed inside wing nut)
1 Beer Tower (Quick Connect) Bayonet Attachment (beer tower installation)
4 Machine Screws (to attach bayonet to beer tower)
1 Gasket (beer tower base)
1 Pull Handle (beer tower faucet)
1 Beer Keg Stand (required for 30 liter keg installations only)
1 Protective Plate (refrigerator cabinet floor)
2 Cantilever Wire Shelves (conversion to all refrigerator application)
1 Chill 'n Tap Exterior Cabinet Plug (located on worktop)
1 CO2 Air Line Hose Plug (located exterior rear cabinet)
1 Plastic Drip Tray (2 piece)

1. Remove Worktop: Using a Phillips Screwdriver, remove the
three screws located on the front underside edge of the
worktop and the three screws located at the rear (back)
side of the worktop.
See Fig's. 1 & 2
Remove the worktop from the cabinet and position the
worktop on top of the cabinet so that the front corners
are staggered across the front corners of the cabinet.
2. Installation of Top Rail: Attach the chrome rail to the work
top using four self-tapping screws from the underside of the
worktop through the pre-drilled holes. (attach the front ends
of the rail first)
3. Re-Install Wo r k t o p : Install the front of the worktop onto the
cabinet, then lower the rear side of the worktop over the
backside of the cabinet. Secure using the same screws
removed earlier. (the smaller screws at the front the larger
screws at the rear)
4. Installation of CO2 Cylinder Support: Install the cylinder
support onto the four studs located on the exterior back
wall of the cabinet. (no tools required) Align the holes in
the cylinder support with the studs and push down firmly.
See Fig. 3
5.
Installation of CO2 Cylinder: Install your " fully charged"
CO2 cylinder into the support stand. IMPORTANT NOTICE:
ALWAYS EXERCISE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN
HANDLING PRESSURIZED C02 CYLINDERS:
6. Installation of C02 Regulator:
Attach the CO2 Regulator to
the C02 cylinder by screwing the regulator nut onto cylinder
valve and tighten (snug) using an adjustable wrench.
7. Installation of C02 Air Line Hose to Regulator: Attach one
end of the (red) air line hose to the hose barb connection
on the CO2 regulator. Secure hose by using one of the two
(self locking) black plastic snap on clamps provided.
(use pliers to snap the clamp tight to assure that there are
no leaks)
See Fig. 5
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5


CHI
1. Remove Worktop: Using a Phillips Screwdriver, remove the
three screws located on the front underside edge of the
worktop and the three screws located at the rear (back)
side of the worktop.
See Fig's. 1 & 2
Remove the worktop from the cabinet and position the
worktop on top of the cabinet so that the front corners
are staggered across the front corners of the cabinet.
2. Installation of Top Rail: Attach the chrome rail to the work
top using four self-tapping screws from the underside of the
worktop through the pre-drilled holes. (attach the front ends
of the rail first)
3. Re-Install Wo r k t o p : Install the front of the worktop onto the
cabinet, then lower the rear side of the worktop over the
backside of the cabinet. Secure using the same screws
removed earlier. (the smaller screws at the front the larger
screws at the rear)
4. Installation of CO2 Cylinder Support: Install the cylinder
support onto the four studs located on the exterior back
wall of the cabinet. (no tools required) Align the holes in
the cylinder support with the studs and push down firmly.
See Fig. 3
5. Installation of CO2 Cylinder: Install your " fully charged"
CO2 cylinder into the support stand. IMPORTANT NOTICE:
ALWAYS EXERCISE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN
HANDLING PRESSURIZED C02 CYLINDERS:
6. Installation of C02 Regulator: Attach the CO2 Regulator to
the C02 cylinder by screwing the regulator nut onto cylinder
valve and tighten (snug) using an adjustable wrench.
7. Installation of C02 Air Line Hose to Regulator: Attach one
end of the (red) air line hose to the hose barb connection
on the CO2 regulator. Secure hose by using one of the two
(self locking) black plastic snap on clamps provided.
(use pliers to snap the clamp tight to assure that there are
no leaks)
See Fig. 5
Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
LL'N TAP ACCESSORIES (included with this unit)

Jan 07, 2008 | Danby DKC646BLS Full Size / Pony Beer Keg...

2 Answers

New danby kegerator - tastes like rubber hose


There is a check valve inside the coupler of the danby kegs that cause this problem. The valve is mainly there to prevent beer from back-flowing when changing the keg. Next time you change your keg check for a little black plastic retainer and also a small white plastic ball inside the coupler. Remove those (or just smell it) and you should notice that this is the taste/smell your beer has. I removed mine after this discovery, and there isn't any issues with the taste/smell since. I've heard this is a common issue with the Danby D coupler systems. Also, you won't have any issues with beer backflow when you change the keg, provided the line going to the tap is empty (which usually is if keg is kicked).

Dec 30, 2007 | Danby DKC646BLS Full Size / Pony Beer Keg...

3 Answers

Way to much head


Take out the temp sensor in the white cage on the left, and put it in a glass of water. That will measure liquid temp instead of air temp. your beer is too warm

Oct 10, 2007 | Danby DKC645BLS Compact Beverage Cooler

1 Answer

Danby Beer Keg dispenser fridge.


Draught (or Draft) beer is almost always un-pasteurized and therefore is more fragile. It should be consumed after being "tapped", and is generally truer to the flavors of the ingredients as pasteurization exposes the beer to heat and changes the flavor profile. Always use brewery approved beer line if you want to have foam free fresh tasting beer. Serving it through a plastic tube from the hardware or discount store or the plain vinyl tubing in your beer tap system you will wind up with a foamy, off tasting beer. Real draught beer is not pasteurized. It must be kept refrigerated between 35F. and 44F. A beer will become wild, turn sour and cloudy in a day or two. Below 44F. a keg of draught beer should last 20-30 days before it loses it's fresh brewery taste and aroma. Craft beers (micro brews) tend to have a shorter shelf life and you should contact the brewery for their recommendations. Why does my beer foam up? The 3 most often causes of beer foaming up are: The temperature of the beer keg The balance of the draught beer system pressures The cleanliness of the draught beer system I would suggest that you clean or replace the beer transport tube...

Aug 11, 2007 | Danby DKC645BLS Compact Beverage Cooler

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