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Both steering rods labeled r and l seem to be the same which make the turn at rear point opposite directions, why? I think they are suppose to both point upward to attach to axle

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Steering on 98 wrangler feels like it has play going into turns both directions


Try this, with the engine off, have someone turn the steering wheel left and right 1/4 turn while you lay on the ground in front carefully watching the movement of all the linkages and stabilizer rod. By your description, it sounds like the bar that is attached to the front differential (pass. side) to the frame mount (driver side) is shot. Observe and confirm.

Dec 30, 2013 | Jeep Wrangler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My riding mower tires are pointing in opposite directions, can i fix this myself


look at the rods that go from behind the wheel to the other side it must be bent look at sears parts online to see what it should look like

Apr 01, 2012 | Garden

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Two mechanics, two different answers. We had the struts replaced on our 1997 Chrysler Concorde a couple months ago. A few weeks ago we had the front tie rods replaced and then needed an alingment. The...


well Janet, the tie rods are what attaches the steering to the wheel assembly, so if the wheel is turned, then yes the tie rod ends are supposed to move up and down a little to compensate for the stress of the wheel moving. if they where installed correctly then the componets should not touch nor become close to each other. tpyically these componets only have one installation procedure, and it is hardly likly to install them wrong, unless the installer forgets to put the washers and rubber in the right order. and it is possible that on some vehicles the left and right tie rod ends are installed opposite of each other and this will cause them to contact other parts, and this is bad. it will bent the tie rods and offset the steering. I have been a heavy line mechanic for the past 20 yrs as well and it sounds like the technition at the alignment shop just dident want to mess with your car. in the center there is a connection point that has two bolts and a flat metal plate to attach the inner tie rods to the rack n pinion, and no these should not move any direction except a rotation, meaning circular, not up and down or left and right. and alot of the time I get this car in my shop is when its just plain worn out and they move around verry sloppy, or someome has not tightened them up enough, because they are a pain to get to. hope this helps.

Dec 31, 2010 | 1997 Chrysler Concorde

1 Answer

Truck tends to have a lot of slop in the steering, must continually move the steering wheel back a forth (seesawing) to maintain the vehicle in it's lane.


depending on the year, there is an adjustment on the steering gearbox to take the slack out of it. kind of job which needs a trained person with proper tools. you may find that if the vehicle is so old that the steering gearbox is shot, there could be a lot of slop in the tie rod ends and ball joints. Also used to be a steering arm "mirror" unit called an idler, i think, on rear wheel drive vehicles, which sits on the opposite side of the car and keeps the tie rod connector parallel with the line defined by the front axles. If you have one and it is bad could cause your problem.

Oct 04, 2010 | Ford F-100 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

New motor in car there is a sqealing noise that get loader when engine is reved up also are the front tires susposed to rotate in opposite directions when in park


1: check the tension of your belts, that is what the squeal sounds like.

2: yes. when the front wheels are off the ground and turned, they will rotate opposite directions. this is normal for a non posi - trac car.

Jul 07, 2010 | 2009 Kia Rio

2 Answers

Craftsman Lawn tractor - When turning to the left the Left front wheel turns much farther then the right front wheel does on a hard right turn. Almost perpendicular to the tractor. Busings are brand new....


I've noticed this on other Craftsman and MTD mowers. The ones with the one main steering rod from the steering wheel to the left wheel and a connecting rod from the left wheel to the right wheel. I think that since we are advised to mow in a counter-clockwise direction, they design the mowers to turn tighter towards the left. It's in the design just like you suspected.

Apr 18, 2010 | Craftsman 17.5 hp 42 in. Deck Lawn Tractor...

2 Answers

JOHN DEERE LA 175... TWO FRONT TIRE ARE NOT TRACKING


John Deere allows up to two and a half inches of tow in on the front wheels,to them this is normal.An adjustable steering rod is available but is not covered under warranty,it's up to you whether or not you need to install it,i suggest that you do.

Apr 18, 2010 | John Deere 420,1020,2010,2020,2510,2520...

3 Answers

Wheel alignment


The main cause of steering wheel off-center is toe misalignment or rear axle misalignment. Toe can fall out of adjustment fairly easily as a result of daily driving, so you can imagine the effects of pounding it through 4WD trails on a regular basis.

Toe is designed to preload the steering linkage to remove play in the system. You can visualize toe angle from above; toe-in, or positive toe, is displayed when the leading edges of the tires are closer together than in the rear. Toe-out, or negative toe, is when the leading edges are farther apart. Zero toe is when wheels are pointed straight ahead and are parallel to each other. A slight amount of positive toe is preferred for most vehicles.

Improper toe angle isn't the only reason a steering wheel won't center. This phenomenon can also be caused by the steering linkage not being centered when toe was adjusted in the first place. This can be corrected by recentering the steering wheel and readjusting toe to proper specs. A bent steering arm or linkage component can also cause the steering wheel to be off-center. I've also seen this occur due to loose steering arm bolts. An off-center steering wheel contributes to tire wear because as the wheels are turned off dead center they turn toe out and increase tire scrubbing.

Sometimes an off-center steering wheel is accompanied by a wheel pull to one direction or the other and could be the result of a damaged component somewhere in the vehicle - a bent axlehousing could be throwing off the rear toe setting (rear toe setting is often overlooked). A bent frame or overly worn suspension bushings can also be the cause. If your wheel is off-center and also pulling, it can be as simple as incorrect tire pressure from side to side. Memory steer is another effect that is usually associated with an off-center steering wheel. This is when the steering wheel returns to an off-center position and can result in steering pull or drift after completing a turn. This can be caused by binding in the steering linkage as well as power steering system issues such as leaks or improper hydraulic pressure. Steering linkage bind occurs when proper geometry is not maintained in lifted vehicles.

Many 4x4s don't have factory provisions for adjusting caster and camber and rear toe and camber, but the front toe setting is easily adjusted. Toe is controlled by the steering linkage. By loosening the adjusters on the tie rod and shortening or lengthening the tie rod by turning the ends, toe angle can be adjusted. This should not be a substitute for regular professional wheel alignment jobs and is simply a tip that can be used to put off frequent trips to the alignment shop due to regular trips to the trail.
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Before determining toe angle and/or performing adjustments, it's a good idea to start the engine and turn the steering wheel side to side to relieve pressure in the system. Then, turn the wheels straight and shut off the engine. You should also roll the vehicle back and forth a few times between measurements.

Get someone to hold the other end of the measuring tape and measure the leading toe distance. This is the distance between the leading edges of the front tires. You'll compare the results to the distance between the trailing edges of the tires directly opposite from where you took the first measurement.

The higher number will indicate toe direction: higher number in leading edge indicates toe out; higher number at trailing edge displays toe in. Larger-than-stock tires require more positive toe for best results.

Once the necessary measurements are performed to determine what the current toe setting is, you can loosen the bolts on the tie-rod adjuster sleeve so that the tie-rod ends can be rotated. Don't forgot to tighten the adjusters when you're done as damage or injury could result.

The tie-rod ends thread into the tie rod. The ends can be threaded in or out of the tie rod to make the assembly longer or shorter. Longer creates more toe out; shorter toe in. Don't make huge adjustments all at once. It's best to adjust and measure a few times to achieve appropriate setting.
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I hope this helps you if you were looking to do a toe alignment yourself if you have decent knowledge of component location on a jeep.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Possible rear wheel problem


if both rear wheels are off the ground, yes. note that they turn in opposite directions.

Jan 03, 2009 | 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

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