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Disease c1.2 Identify Common illnesses and infections caused by bacteria viruses, Fungi and Parasitesaused by bacteria

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Is facebook currently experiencing a rootkit virus

...I am told that if you receive a message from FB support requesting that you re-submit your email address..........it is a virus......

...there was also a virus last week on mofia, and cafe world......hope this helps

Posted on Mar 24, 2010

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Jobson143
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SOURCE: i suspect my mobile may

go to memu---then settings----restore fact sett---restore all
& then a window will apperar that would you like to restore [press ok]
then another window will appear there you type your password
then it must be done

Posted on Nov 26, 2010

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SOURCE: Do drinking fountains easily infect one person with other peoples' contagious diseases?

When drinking fountains were first created they used to shoot "water one inch straight into the air, creating a bubbling texture, and the excess water" used to run "back down over the sides of the nozzle" (wikipedia) This was definitely an easy way to convey deseases. However, after a while, the production of drinking fountains started adopting an arc projection, which made it easier for the person to drink and made it more sanitary. Nowdays the jet of water goes as far as four inches in order to avoid infections and bacterial transmission.

Posted on Jul 03, 2013

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SOURCE: More detail on nose virus/fungi infection

for any type of medical answers or treatment go to your doctor

Posted on Sep 06, 2016

sayyedali253
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SOURCE: I had a chest infection and bacteria infection for 6months it has left me so tired and and no energy what can I do to feel better

Grab some honey and 2or3 tbs on morning before breakfast.and if it not work go see your doctor

Posted on May 12, 2017

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I HAVE CONCORD GRAPES THE FRUIT DIEING ON VINE AND LEAVES ARE DRYING UP


Have a read. Disease, pests or virus.

Grape Diseases and Drying on the Vine ' Home Guides ' SF Gate

homeguides.sfgate.com > Garden > Pest Control
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The leaves become mottled with tiny black spots and the fruit also bears dark spots. ... Most of the diseases that cause drying grapes on the vine are fungal ...

Why Are the Grapes Dying on the Vine? ' Home Guides ' SF Gate

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Luckily, the fungi, insects and bacteria that cause fruit to rot or wither are easily ... Summer bunch rot-infected grapes have black, brown or green powdery fungal ... Removing leaves at the base of stems once grapes have set helps control both ... Best Time to Pick Concord Grapes for the Best Flavor ยท Grapevines & Leaf Curl ...

What Are the Causes of Grapes Turning Black Before They Ripen ...

homeguides.sfgate.com > Garden > Pest Control
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If your grapes turn black on the vine before they ripen, the cause is usually black rot. ... which helps prevent infection by speeding the drying of leaves and fruit.

Why are my grapes turning dark and drying up before they ripen ...

https://ask.extension.org/questions/199835
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Jul 16, 2014 - Minimize black rot problems by removing infected fruit, cleaning up mummies, and pruning out leaves that surround fruit clusters. See fruit links ...

Grape Diseases ' Integrated Pest Management Program - MSU IPM

www.ipm.msu.edu/grape_diseases
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Oct 16, 2014 - Leaves develop numerous dark brown spots, 1/25 to 1/5 inch (1 to 5 mm) in diameter. ... resulting in distinctive clusters of dead vines within the vineyard. ... Berries that do not fall off shrivel up, similar to black rot-infected berries. .... This disease occurs only in Concord and Catawba grapes in Michigan.
CONCORD GRAPES THE FRUIT DIEING ON VINE AND LEAVES ARE DRYING UP Google...

Aug 14, 2017 | Cooking

1 Answer

Helicobacterpylori,what is it??


What is an H. pylori infection? H. pylori are spiral-shaped bacteria that grow in the digestive tract and have a tendency to attack the stomach lining. H. pylori infections are usually harmless, but they're responsible for the majority of ulcers in the stomach and small intestine.
H. pylori is a common type of bacteria that usually infects the stomach. They may be present in more than half of all people in the world, according to the Mayo Clinic. The "H" in the name is short for Helicobacter. "Helico" means spiral. The bacteria are spiral shaped.
H. pylori normally infect your stomach during childhood. While infections with this strain of bacteria typically don't cause symptoms, they can lead to diseases in some people, including peptic ulcers, and an inflammatory condition inside your stomach known as gastritis.
H. pylori are adapted to live in the harsh, acidic environment of the stomach. These bacteria can change the environment around them and reduce its acidity so they can survive. The shape of H. pylori allows them to penetrate your stomach lining, where they're protected by mucus and your body's immune cells are not able to reach them. The bacteria can interfere with your immune response and ensure that they're not destroyed. This can lead to stomach problems. Causes
What causes H. pylori infections? It's still not known exactly how H. pylori infections spread. The bacteria have coexisted with humans for many thousands of years. The infections are thought to spread from one person's mouth to another. They may also be transferred from poopystuff to the mouth. This can happen when a person does not wash their hands thoroughly after using the bathroom. H. pylori can also spread through contact with contaminated water or food.
The bacteria are believed to cause stomach problems when they penetrate the stomach's mucous lining and generate substances that neutralize stomach acids. This makes the stomach cells more vulnerable to the harsh acids. Stomach acid and H. pylori together irritate the stomach lining and may cause sores or peptic ulcers in your stomach or duodenum, which is the first part of your small intestine.

pylori Infection

Jun 24, 2017 | Miscellaneous

1 Answer

I HAVE A COMMON CARP WITH GROWTH UNDER THE SCALES


Common carp infected with vertical scale disease. Epidemic situation - This disease mainly infects common carp, crucian carp, grass carp, silver carp, and, occasionally, goldfish (Cyprinus auratus). ... The average mortality of parent fish as a result of vertical scale disease is 45 per cent.

Chapter 6MAIN FISH DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL

Jan 22, 2017 | The Health & Beauty

1 Answer

I had phenomia 4 years ago the doctor gave me a prescription for antibiotics they cost about 100 dollars each I need to know what the were


Antibiotics are used to treat bacteria infections. It destroys their cell walls in order to kill them. Thus, treat that particular type of disease.Pneumonia is caused by a type of bacteria known as Streptococcus pneumoniae.
Since pneumonia is caused by a bacteria, antibiotics is needed to destroy the bacteria.

Jun 15, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Is gastroenteritis, fungi, tetanus, pneumonia, cold-flu or Tuberculosis bacterial infections?


Wow, that is a long question! A virus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis but it CAN be caused by a bacteria such as eColi. A fungi is a fungus and not bacterial, although they are closely related. Tetanus is caused by a bacteria that lives in dirt. The most common cause of pneumonia is bacterial but there are viral and fungal pneumonias. A cold is caused by a virus but can have a secondary bacterial infection. Tuberculosis is caused by a bacteria called mycobacterium.

Apr 05, 2015 | Anti Bacterial Health & Beauty

2 Answers

Are you more prone to getting a fungal infection if you take antibiotics?


Yes, you are more prone to fungal infections because the antibiotic may kill the normal harmless bacteria that live and make it easier for fungi to flourish.

Apr 22, 2013 | Health & Beauty

2 Answers

Why do bacterias attack humans?


Parasitic bacteria invade humans because they cannot survive otherwise. The human body is their natural environment and their metabolic functions can be carried out only by disrupting ours. So they attack and invade humans.

Jun 20, 2012 | Samsung Galaxy Tab Tablet PC

1 Answer

Why sharing of razor are not permitted


sharing of razors can lead to serious infections as the razor might be in contact with blood or even the skin where fungi and other infection-causing bacteria would be found! So,never share your razor with anyone else.

Feb 21, 2011 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

Why do dieseasea spread after floods?


Because animals and people get drowned in floods and their bodies decay often in the water that's used for drinking and washing. Also floods flow into sewerage systems and wash the sewage into drinking and washing water infecting them with bacteria which cause disease.

Nov 27, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

What is virus history?


In 1884, the French microbiologist Charles Chamberland invented a filter (known today as the Chamberland filter or Chamberland-Pasteur filter), with pores smaller than bacteria. Thus, he could pass a solution containing bacteria through the filter and completely remove them from the solution. In 1892 the Russian biologist Dimitri Ivanovski used this filter to study what is now known to be tobacco mosaic virus. His experiments showed that the crushed leaf extracts from infected tobacco plants are still infectious after filtration. Ivanovski suggested the infection might be caused by a toxin produced by bacteria, but did not pursue the idea.At the time it was thought that all infectious agents could be retained by filters and grown on a nutrient medium—this was part of the germ theory of disease.In 1898 the Dutch microbiologist Martinus Beijerinck repeated the experiments and became convinced that this was a new form of infectious agent. He went on to observe that the agent multiplied only in dividing cells, but as his experiments did not show that it was made of particles, he called it a contagium vivum fluidum (soluble living germ) and re-introduced the word virus.Beijerinck maintained that viruses were liquid in nature, a theory later discredited by Wendell Stanley, who proved they were particulate. In the same year, 1899, Friedrich Loeffler and Frosch passed the agent of foot and mouth disease (aphthovirus) through a similar filter and ruled out the possibility of a toxin because of the high dilution; they concluded that the agent could replicate.

In the early 20th century, the English bacteriologist Frederick Twort discovered the viruses that infect bacteria, which are now called bacteriophages,and the French-Canadian microbiologist Félix d'Herelle described viruses that, when added to bacteria on agar, would produce areas of dead bacteria. He accurately diluted a suspension of these viruses and discovered that the highest dilutions, rather than killing all the bacteria, formed discrete areas of dead organisms. Counting these areas and multiplying by the dilution factor allowed him to calculate the number of viruses in the suspension.

By the end of the nineteenth century, viruses were defined in terms of their infectivity, filterability, and their requirement for living hosts. Viruses had been grown only in plants and animals. In 1906, Harrison invented a method for growing tissue in lymph, and, in 1913, E. Steinhardt, C. Israeli, and R. A. Lambert used this method to grow vaccinia virus in fragments of guinea pig corneal tissue.In 1928, H. B. Maitland and M. C. Maitland grew vaccinia virus in suspensions of minced hens' kidneys. Their method was not widely adopted until the 1950s, when poliovirus was grown on a large scale for vaccine production.

Another breakthrough came in 1931, when the American pathologist Ernest William Goodpasture grew influenza and several other viruses in fertilised chickens' eggs.In 1949 John F. Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins grew polio virus in cultured human embryo cells, the first virus to be grown without using solid animal tissue or eggs. This work enabled Jonas Salk to make an effective polio vaccine.

With the invention of electron microscopy in 1931 by the German engineers Ernst Ruska and Max Knoll came the first images of viruses.In 1935 American biochemist and virologist Wendell Stanley examined the Tobacco mosaic virus and found it to be mostly made from protein.A short time later, this virus was separated into protein and RNA parts. Tobacco mosaic virus was the first one to be crystallised and whose structure could therefore be elucidated in detail. The first X-ray diffraction pictures of the crystallised virus were obtained by Bernal and Fankuchen in 1941. Based on her pictures, Rosalind Franklin discovered the full structure of the virus in 1955.In the same year, Heinz Fraenkel-Conrat and Robley Williams showed that purified Tobacco mosaic virus RNA and its coat protein can assemble by themselves to form functional viruses, suggesting that this simple mechanism was probably how viruses assembled within their host cells.

The second half of the twentieth century was the golden age of virus discovery and most of the 2,000 recognised species of animal, plant, and bacterial viruses were discovered during these years.In 1957, equine arterivirus and the cause of Bovine virus diarrhea (a pestivirus) were discovered. In 1963, the hepatitis B virus was discovered by Baruch Blumberg,and in 1965, Howard Temin described the first retrovirus. Reverse transcriptase, the key enzyme that retroviruses use to translate their RNA into DNA, was first described in 1970, independently by Howard Temin and David Baltimore.] In 1983 Luc Montagnier's team at the Pasteur Institute in France, first isolated the retrovirus now called HIV.

Sep 24, 2009 | Network Associates VirusScan ASaP Silver...

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