Question about TC Electronic BG250 250W 1x15 Bass Combo Amp Single 15" driver and 1" tweeter 886830413735

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BG250 250W 1x15 Bass tweeter vibrating - TC Electronic BG250 250W 1x15 Bass Combo Amp Single 15" driver and 1" tweeter 886830413735

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Acoustic b600h


Relay?? I've never seen a guitar or bass amp with "speaker protection relays"...usually they're either on or off. Check the simple stuff 1st...is speaker cable from head to cabinet and/or the input cable from bass to the amp good? Check the "Direct Out" for a line level signal (must be connected to a PA or other amplifier) as this is your preamp out signal. Also, plug a shielded cable from "Effects Send" to "Effects Return"...this will verify "effects" loop issues if any. Lastly, vibration test...use a clenched fist across the top, sides and bottom of wood cabinet to lightly "jar" the internal circuits. If it starts working even for an instant, I would suspect intermittent connection inside.

Jul 30, 2014 | Acoustic B600h 600W Bass Head And B115neo...

1 Answer

No bass


Check the wiring and also bad connections to the speaker first, then to the crossover connections next.

Mar 11, 2014 | Behringer B215D Powered Speaker (550 Watts...

2 Answers

Speaker rattle


Yes, but you need to replace the entire speaker. The 1505 and 1508 use a different magnet though they look similar..

Jan 20, 2014 | Peavey Music

2 Answers

My jamo d115 speaker tweeter distorts or rattels when any serious bass kicks in, how do you stop this?w


Possible this is a distortion from the Amplifier if the speakers are not damaged. however it is important to switch the speakers to confirm if the fault is relative to the particular channel in which case the amplifier is faulty. If not the speaker can be the culprit. All what is needed is to reduce the BASS level a bit lower when the volume is increased so as to allow the cross over to work. Also if teh cross- over network is faulty within the speaker the bass can vibrate on the tweeter.

Dec 01, 2011 | Jamo Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Rattle/vibration in the horn of my 4x10 cabinet


Open cabinet and look for loose wiring. You may have blown the tweeter horn if nothing is loose.

Aug 25, 2011 | Behringer Ultrabass Bb410 1200w 4x10 Bass...

1 Answer

My bass part of the pro 150 is working but not the tweeter part...whats gone wrong the diaphragm looks goog so im confused are there fuses in them for seperate tweeter bass etc..thanks hope you can...


Tweeters blow pretty easily. Access the back of the tweeter and touch a weak battery across it's leads. It should click if the coil isn't fried open or shorted.

May 16, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

The compression speaker does not work


Here is your schematic for the power amp. There is a separate amp for the tweeter using a LM3886 which is fairly well protected. Open the unit and test the tweeter driver.

http://elektrotanya.com/behringer_b215a_power-amps_psu_sch.pdf/download.html

Scroll down to "Get Manual" and click on it to download the schematic. At the site is also the preamp section as a separate schematic. You probably don't need that for the failure you are seeing. A lot of the tweeter drivers seem to get blown up, but once you test you will be able to find if the problem is in the amp or the driver.

May 03, 2011 | Behringer B215D Powered Speaker (550 Watts...

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a


First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

Back speakers can't handle bass


you need to replace all the speakers in the truck except the front tweeters if you have them. I replaced all four with new infinitys from futureshop. Installed it was near 500 dollars. You need to get 2 ohm to match the infinity deck if yours is infinity. Most other systems are 4 ohm, these are 2 x 2 ohms for 2 and 4 ohm use. the factory's are garbage and use paper cones. The rears have plastic caps holding the tweeters in. On all four the paper was ripped away from the magnet and it caused them to vibrate and shake, once replaced with 180 watt infinitys...great sound.

Jul 06, 2010 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

How to take the speaker apart to repair or replace tweeter


Take off/unscrew the upper bass/mid , insert your hand and gently twist the tweeter magnet assembly anti-clockwise about a quarter of a turn, and remove thru upper bass hole Peter Speakerworks.com.au

Mar 17, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

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