Question about Cycling

1 Answer

Bike problem I have taken apart the front bottom bracket in an attempt to rotate the housing thus putting more tension on the slightly worn chain. I have the cap screw out and no matter what i do the housing doesn't budge. Mark

Posted by on

  • active_one May 20, 2009

    The front BB housing on a most tandems has some sort of adjustment feature to take up slack in the chain between pedal sets.
    I am at a loss as to how the Fuji accommodate this adjustment.


  • Rommel Balcita May 11, 2010

    yy

×

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 86 Answers

Its better to replace it .

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Noise clanking, hard to pedal


check the chain tension, this could be caused by the chain being too tight. Loosen the rear wheel nuts, slide the wheel slightly forward and retighten the nuts. See if that helps. If it is still hard to pedal then the crank's bottom bracket may need to be adjusted and could require special tools that your local bike shop would have.

Mar 05, 2014 | Huffy 26 in. Cranbrook Cruiser Bike

Tip

How to Remove and Replace the Bottom Bracket on an Indoor Cycling Bike


Following is a basic guideline of removing and replacing the bottom bracket on an indoor cycling bike. Due to the different brands of indoor cycling bikes and designs for bottom brackets, the following should only be used as a guideline. If any of the information is not exact to the bike being serviced, refer to the service manual or call Sportsmith for further help.
Common Tools Needed:
Phillips Screw Driver
Set of Allen Wrenches (standard and metric)
Bottom Bracket Tool
Cotterless Crank Puller Tool
9/16" Socket
Ratchet Wrench
Pedal Wrench
Crescent Wrench
You will begin by removing the outside belt/chain guard by using either or both the Phillips screw driver and Allen wrenches. It may be necessary to remove the drive side pedal (using the pedal wrench) in order to completely remove the outside belt/chain guard.
Once the belt/chain guard is removed, you will need to remove the belt/chain. If the unit is belt driven, you can simply "walk" the belt off the pulley by pushing the belt to the outside while turning the crank backwards. **CAUTION: PINCH POINT ** If the unit is chain driven, most use a continuous chain that can be "walked" off the sprocket just like the belt. **CAUTION: PINCH POINT ** Some chains may use a connecting link and can be separated at the connecting link to remove the chain. The connecting link is different in appearance from all other chain links.
Now it is time to remove the crank arms. How to Use a Cotterless Crank Puller Tool
It works best to place the bike upside down for best leverage to remove the bottom bracket. (If placing the bike upside down, ensure proper seat adjustment for best bike balance.) Begin removing the bottom bracket from the drive side of the bike. This side has a reverse thread. You will need to turn right to loosen and remove the bottom bracket. Place the teeth of the bottom bracket tool into the teeth of the bottom bracket cup. Using the ratchet wrench or crescent wrench to turn the bottom bracket tool, you will turn right to loosen and remove the bottom bracket. (If removal of the bottom bracket is difficult, it helps to use a crescent wrench in combination with a bolt threaded into the bottom bracket shaft to hold the tool in place while applying pressure to break the bottom bracket loose.) Remove the bottom bracket from the frame. Remove the bottom bracket cup and/or lock ring from the non-drive side of the bike. This is a standard thread. You will turn left to loosen and remove this bottom bracket cup and/or lock ring.
Install the new bottom bracket from the drive side and tighten flush to the frame. Install the bottom bracket cup and/or lock ring to the non-drive side and tighten.
Re-install the crank arms and pedals. Make sure the crank arm bolts are tightened to the proper torque. If unsure of proper torque specs, refer to the equipment service manual or call Sportsmith.
Re-install the belt/chain onto the pulley/sprocket. If belt/chain was "walked" off the pulley for removal, it can be "walked" onto the pulley/sprocket by placing the belt or chain along the bottom of the pulley/sprocket. Carefully, turn the crank arm forward while lifting on the belt/chain. **CAUTION: PINCH POINT ** Continuing turning the crank forward until the belt/chain is in place.
Re-install the outside chain guard and test the unit. Ride the bike without tension and test with tension. Ensure functionality and feel of the ride. Make any adjustments if necessary


Removing and Replacing Bottom Bracket on Indoor Cycling Bike

on Mar 11, 2015 | Exercise & Fitness

1 Answer

Two banging sounds with each rotation


Most beach cruisers have a chain guard. There is always a slight "wobble" of the front chain ring, check to make sure the chain isn't slapping the chain guard. The chain guard can be adjusted. The chain also might have loose tension causing it to bounce around just enough to hit the chain guard. The opposite may be true, if the chain is too tight, you could be getting a popping sound at certain points on the chain as it messes with the gear teeth, in this case loosen the chain slightly to put a little slack in it.

Jan 14, 2014 | Huffy 26 in. Cranbrook Cruiser Bike

1 Answer

Need the timing marks for a 2000 alero


please let me know if you have questions.
2.4L Engine
NOTE It is recommended that the entire procedure be reviewed before attempting to service the timing chain.
  1. Before servicing the vehicle, refer to the precautions section.
  2. Drain the cooling system.
  3. Remove or disconnect the following: Negative battery cable, Coolant surge tank, Accessory drive belt, Alternator
  4. Install an engine support.
  5. Remove or disconnect the following: Upper cover fasteners, Front cover vent hose, Right engine mount and bracket, Right front wheel, Right lower splash shield, Crankshaft balancer, Lower cover fasteners, Front cover
  6. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise, as viewed from front of engine (normal rotation) until the camshaft sprocket's timing dowel pin holes align with the timing chain housing holes. The crankshaft sprocket mark should align with the engine mark. The crankshaft sprocket keyway should point upward and align with the cylinder bores centerline. This is the normal timed position.
  7. Remove the timing chain guides.
  8. Remove the timing chain tensioner.
    NOTE Be sure all the slack in the timing chain is above the tensioner assembly when removing it. CAUTION The tensioner plunger is spring loaded and could fly out causing personal injury.
  9. Remove or disconnect the following: Timing chain, Camshaft sprockets

To install:
  1. Install or connect the following: Camshaft sprockets. Torque the bolts to 52 ft. lbs. (70 Nm),
    Camshaft sprocket alignment pin through the camshaft sprockets holes into the timing chain housing holes to position the camshafts for timing.
  2. If the camshafts are out of position and must be rotated more than 1 / 8 turn in order to install the alignment dowel pins, perform the following:
    1. Rotated the crankshaft 90 degrees clockwise off Top Dead Center (TDC) in order to give the valves adequate clearance to open.
    2. Once the camshafts are positioned and the dowels installed, rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise back to TDC.
      WARNING Do not rotate the crankshaft clockwise to TDC or valve and piston damage may occur.
  3. Install the timing chain over the exhaust camshaft sprocket, around the idler sprocket and around the crankshaft sprocket.
    jturcotte_2361.gifjturcotte_2362.gif

    Fig. Timing chain and sprocket alignment positions-2.4L DOHC engine

  4. Remove the alignment dowel pin from the intake camshaft. Using a dowel pin remover tool, rotate the intake camshaft sprocket counterclockwise enough to slide the timing chain over the intake camshaft sprocket. Release the camshaft sprocket wrench. The length of chain between the 2 camshaft sprockets will tighten.
    NOTE If properly timed, the intake camshaft alignment dowel pin should slide in easily. If the dowel pin does not fully index, the camshafts are not timed correctly and the procedure must be repeated.
  5. Leave the alignment dowel pins installed.
  6. With slack removed from chain between intake camshaft sprocket and crankshaft sprocket, the timing marks on the crankshaft and the cylinder block should be aligned. If marks are not aligned, move the chain 1 tooth forward or rearward, remove slack and recheck the marks.
  7. Tighten the chain housing to engine stud. The stud is installed under the timing chain. Torque it to 19 ft. lbs. (26 Nm).
  8. Reload the timing chain tensioner as follows:
    1. Form a keeper from heavy gauge wire.
    2. Slightly, compress the shoe plunger and insert a small screwdriver into the access hole.
    3. Release the ratchet pawl and compress the plunger completely into the hole.
    4. Insert the keeper between the access hole and the blade.
  9. Install or connect the following:
    Tensioner assembly to the chain housing. Torque the bolts to 89 inch lbs. (10 Nm). Tensioner shoe and retainer. Torque the bolts to 89 inch lbs. (10 Nm). NOTE Recheck plunger assembly installation. It is correctly installed when the long end is toward the crankshaft.
  10. Remove the alignment dowel pins. Rotate crankshaft clockwise 2 full rotations. Align the crankshaft timing mark with mark on cylinder block and reinstall alignment dowel pins. Alignment dowel pins will slide in easily if engine is timed correctly.
    WARNING If the engine is not correctly timed, severe engine damage could occur.
  11. Install or connect the following: Timing chain guides, New seal into the front cover by lubricating the seal lip and tapping it into place, Front cover and gaskets. Torque the nuts and bolts to 106 inch lbs. (12 Nm), Crankshaft balancer. Torque the bolt to 129 ft. lbs. (175 Nm), Right front lower splash shield, Front wheel. Torque the nuts to 100 ft. lbs. (140 Nm), Right engine mount bracket. Torque the bolts to 81 ft. lbs. (110 Nm) plus an additional 90 degree turn, Right engine mount. Torque the bolt to 49 ft. lbs. (60 Nm), Upper cover vent hose
  12. Remove the engine support.
  13. Install or connect the following: Alternator. Torque the bolts to 37 ft. lbs. (50 Nm), Accessory drive belt, Coolant surge tank, Negative battery cable.
  14. Refill the cooling system.
  15. Start the engine and check for leaks.

Oct 04, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I cannot find my manual to my 18v cordless chainsaw ccs818. I need directions for putting the chain back on. I would like to download a copy of the manual.


Your manual can be found here:

http://www.blackanddecker.com/Manuals.aspx with pop-ups enabled then enter your model number
or
http://www.dewaltservicenet.com/documents/English/Instruction%20Manual/90560838,CCS818.pdf

See the instructions for replacing the chain on page 11. It makes reference to the figures on page 6 so that you know exactly what to remove.

Basically... loosen the bar allen screws. Remove the sprocket cover. Loosen the bar retaining bolts. Use a flat bladed screwdriver on the bar / chain tension screw to shorten the bar enough to install the chain. Then adjust the chain tensioner so that there is just a little slack in the chain at the bottom of bar between the drive sprocket and the bar. Tighten the bar retaining bolts install the cover / tighten all cover fasteners. (see details D and E page 6 of the 2nd link above.)

The steps below are copied from the manual.... I can not undo the formatting and can not post the figures here due to size restrictions..

Thanks for choosing FixYa,
Kelly

Replacing the Saw Chain

CAUTION: Sharp chain. Always wear protective gloves when

handling the chain. The chain is sharp and can cut you when it is

not running.

WARNING: Sharp moving chain. To prevent accidental

operation, insure that battery is disconnected from the tool

before performing the following operations. Failure to do this

could result in serious personal injury.

• Place the saw on a firm surface. Rotate the two allen head screws

(11) counterclockwise with the wrench (13) provided as shown in

figure E.

• To remove the saw chain (9), rotate the tension adjustment screw

(23) in the front of the housing using the flat screwdriver end of the

wrench (13) as shown in figure F. Turning the screw

counterclockwise allows the guide bar to recede and reduces the

tension on the chain so that it may be removed.

• Remove sprocket cover (10) and allen head screws (11).

• Lift the worn saw chain (9) out of the groove in the guide bar (8).

• Place new chain in groove of guide bar making sure saw teeth are

facing correct direction by matching arrow on chain with graphic on

housing shown in figure G.

• Place the saw chain and guide bar assembly around the sprocket

(19). Check to make sure that the slot (20) in the guide bar (8) is

over the two location pins (21) shown in figure E and that the hole

below the slot is located over the adjustment pin (22).

• Replace sprocket cover (10) and thread allen head screws (11) in

with wrench until snug, then back wrench off one full turn.

• Pull bar nose up and keep it up as you adjust tension.

• Rotate the tension adjustment screw (23) in the front of the housing

clockwise to increase the chain tension as in Figure F.

Follow instructions in "Adjusting Chain Tension" section.

• While still holding the bar nose up, securely tighten the rear allen

screw (11) first, then tighten the front allen screw.

• When the chain is new check the tension frequently (after

disconnecting battery) during the first 2 hours of use as a new chain

stretches slightly.

Adjusting Chain Tension

CAUTION: Sharp chain. Always wear protective gloves when

handling the chain. The chain is sharp and can cut you when it is

not running.

WARNING: Sharp moving chain. To prevent accidental

operation, insure that battery is disconnected from the tool

before performing the following operations. Failure to do this

could result in serious personal injury.

• With the saw still on a firm surface check the chain tension. The
tension is correct when the chain snaps back after being pulled

1/8 inch (3mm) away from the guide bar (8) with light force from the

middle finger and thumb as shown in figure H. There should be no

"sag" between the guide bar and the chain on the underside as

shown in figure I.

• To adjust saw chain tension, loosen the allen head screws (11).

• Rotate the tension adjustment screw (23) in the front of the housing

using the flat screwdriver end of the wrench (13) as shown in

figure F.

• Do not over-tension the chain as this will lead to excessive wear

and will reduce the life of the bar and chain. Overtensioning also

reduces the amount of cuts you will get per battery charge.

• Once chain tension is correct, tighten allen head screws (11).

• When the chain is new check the tension frequently (after

disconnecting battery) during the first 2 hours of use as a new chain
stretches slightly.

Nov 08, 2010 | Black & Decker Garden

1 Answer

Periodic clicking in the bottom bracket


You could have a tight link in your chain or need a bottom bracket rebuild. To check the chain, put the bike upside down and turn the pedals slowly and watch for one of the links to lift slightly, if it does just work the links on either side until it loosens up. Hopefully that is what the problem is. Now, if it is the bottom bracket, take it in for service because you have to have special tools to take it apart. Good luck

Oct 09, 2010 | Mongoose Cycling

1 Answer

I just had my water pump changed and when everything was all finished I was told to start my car. Well it started right up but it sounded like the chain was dragging on metal. I opened the front plate and...


here is the procedure for the tensioner:
    1. Purge oil from the timing chain tensioner using the following procedure:
    1. Remove the tensioner from the tensioner housing.
    2. Place the check ball end of the tensioner into the shallow end of the Tensioner Resetting Special tool 8186.
    3. Using hand pressure, slowly depress the tensioner until oil is purged from the cylinder.
    4. Reinstall the tensioner into the tensioner housing.

    1. Reset the timing chain tensioner using the following procedure:
    1. Position the cylinder plunger into the deeper side of the Tensioner Resetting special tool 8186.
    2. Apply a downward force until the tensioner is reset.
      WARNING Ensure that the tensioner is properly reset. The tensioner body must be bottomed against the top edge of the Tensioner Resetting Special tool 8186. Failure to properly perform the resetting procedure may cause tensioner jamming.
    1. Install the chain tensioner into the right cylinder head.
    2. At the right cylinder head, insert a 3 / 8 in. square drive extension with a breaker bar into the intake camshaft drive hub. Rotate the camshaft until the camshaft hub aligns with the camshaft sprocket and damper attaching holes. Install the sprocket attaching bolts and torque to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm).
    3. Turn the left camshaft by inserting a 3 / 8 in. square drive extension with a breaker bar into the intake camshaft drive hub. Rotate the camshaft until the camshaft hub aligns with the camshaft sprocket and damper attaching holes. Install the sprocket attaching bolts and torque to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm).
    4. If necessary, rotate the engine slightly clockwise to remove any slack in the timing chain.
    5. To arm the timing chain tensioner: Use a flat-bladed prytool to gently pry the tensioner arm towards the tensioner slightly. Then, release the tensioner arm. Verify the tensioner extends.

    Oct 04, 2010 | 2002 Dodge Intrepid

    1 Answer

    Slipping


    Your rear sprocket is worn. As your put the pressure on the pedals the chain is riding over the teeth and makes a crunching sound. The teeth could appear slightly hooked. You will probably find this does not happen in a different gear. You need to replace both the cassette (rear sprocket assembly) and the chain together because the chain wears to match the sprocket and if you just replace one you will still get the slipping. The front chain ring also wears but at a much slower than the rear so check it as well. Also check the rear derailleur that it is tensioning the chain correctly and not damaged or if the bike is a single speed the rear wheel is positioned to give the correct chain tension.

    Sep 20, 2009 | Cycling

    1 Answer

    Popping skipping chain


    how long have you had the chain on your bike? it may be worn (or your rear cassette may be) if skipping is occurring. have you attempted to adjust your shifters as well?

    May 01, 2009 | Cycling

    Not finding what you are looking for?
    Cycling Logo

    Related Topics:

    77 people viewed this question

    Ask a Question

    Usually answered in minutes!

    Top Cycling Experts

    yadayada
    yadayada

    Level 3 Expert

    76109 Answers

    kakima

    Level 3 Expert

    102366 Answers

    John Egan
    John Egan

    Level 2 Expert

    73 Answers

    Are you a Cycling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

    Answer questions

    Manuals & User Guides

    Loading...