Question about Honda Mmd 5000 Watt Generator W/ Engine Ngk 6000H

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I have a reading of 120 volts accross red and black leads but I am also getting 23 volts from either red or black to ground terminal. when I plug in a wiring tester it shows voltage on ground. What co

I am trying to power up a hi eff furnace direct

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You need to tie into the 220 voltage at you breaker panel... 5000 watts will barely power your heater. you will not be able to power it direct as it needs low voltage for the control... but I am not an expert

Posted on Dec 28, 2013

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SOURCE: the voltage output from outlet

there is a problem with the internal connection,unless the genset is worth over 200 dollars dont bother trying to fix it

Posted on Jun 12, 2011

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I have a new heater with diferant terminals from the old one so not sure how to atach the wires


There is no need to rewire the internal of the heater!
Just bring in the electrical supply to the heater, it can be either 120 or 240 volts.
If the heater you have is like the picture associated with your post, then all then have to do is change the supplied plug from 240 to 120. It comes pre set for 240. That plug is inside the cabinet.

If any other brand, then you need to change the wires at the transformer of the heater. All heaters need to be supplied with primary voltage: 120 or 240. Then the control system is supplied with secondary voltage out of the transformer. The secondary voltage is no more than 28 volts. and these wires are normally colored as blue or yellow.

Secondary power is already wired within the heater. NO need to change where they are. You will only need to deal with the Primary wiring.

There are many varieties of transformers that transform high primary voltage to a low secondary voltage of 28 volts. and these transformers have many wires: primary & secondary.
I will try to make this easy to understand.

If you have a Gas Heater Transformer with these colors:
  • Red
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or...
  • Red
  • White with Red Stripe
  • Black
  • White with Black Stripe
  • Green
These are Dual Voltage Transformers, you can bring in either 120 Volts or 240 Volts

If you bring in only 120 Volts...
1st example:
The Red wire will not be used! Hot wire to the Black, and the Neutral/Common, to the white wire. Green to ground.

2nd example:
Connect the Red wire with the White with Red Stripe together and connect these to the incoming Neutral/Common wire, normally White.
Connect the Black Wire with the White with Black Stripe to your incoming Hot Wire, which is normally Black.
Green to ground

If you bring in 240 Volts...
1st example.
1 Hot wire to the Red, the Other Hot wire to the Black, and White wire is not used. Green to ground

2nd Example:
Wire nut the two Striped wires together. then one incoming Hot wire to the Black, the other incoming Hot wire to Red.
Green to ground

Or This is only a Low voltage - 120 Volts Only
  • Black
  • White
  • Green
Or either any of these combinations...
  • 2 Blacks w/Green
  • 2 Reds w/Green
  • 1 Black, 1 Red w/green
This type will only be a high voltage, 240 volts only
Picture below is what a transformer looks like and it is where your incoming supply wires go. The smaller leads with the spade connections will go to a specific location & is the 'Secondary" .

Good Luck



25568369-di2jpn2pb5nzkrgf0hzbmyq5-3-0.jpg

Mar 14, 2015 | Pool & Spa

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.
Comment by gotgeek2, posted on Jan 08, 2010ckuzkuz, I'm a licensed master electrician in 2 states with 30 years in the trade. I've installed a lot of Intermatic timers over the years. I wrote this tip because I saw that a lot of folks were having problems wiring them.

on Mar 07, 2010 | Garden

Tip

How to wire Intermatic T103 and T104 timers


These instructions are for USA residential wiring only.

VERY IMPORTANT: Understand that in US residential wiring the WHITE wire is _NOT_ ALWAYS_ the neutral wire. Additionally, prior to 1999 the National Electric Code (NEC) did not require that these white wires be re-identified with black tape or similar means when used for purposes other than neutral. The white wire is sometimes used as a hot, especially when wiring Intermatic T103 and T104 timers.

Also understand that the WHITE neutral wire and the bare (or green) equipment grounding wire are connected together ONLY at the main electric power panel and must _never_be connected together _again_. Once those two wires leave the main electric panel, the WHITE neutral wire must _always_ remain insulated from the bare or green equipment grounding wire. This is very important for safety considerations.

If your wiring is very old and does not have a bare equipment grounding conductor, you _must_ protect the circuit with a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interupter). GFCI wiring is not difficult but is beyond the scope of this post.

DETERMINE WHAT CABLE YOU HAVE:
Usually one will find one of the three following scenarios for the incoming supply cables when wiring a T103 or T104 Intermatic timer:

1...A 120 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE (hot), white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with the T103, but not the T104.

2...A 240 volt cable with 3 wires: black, white, and bare. The black is LINE(hot), the WHITE is LINE (HOT), and the bare is equipment grounding. Black to white is 240 volts. This scenario is used with the T104 ONLY.

3...A 120/240 volt cable with 4 wires: Black, red, white, and bare. The black and red are (LINE) hot, white is neutral and bare is equipment grounding. Black to red is 240 volts. Black to white is 120 volts. Red to white is 120 volts. This scenario can be used with either the T103 or the T104.

The only difference between the T103 and the T104 is the timer motor voltage rating. The T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor and the T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor. The T103 timer motor is connected to terminal "A" and terminal #3 during manufacturing. The T104 timer motor is connected to terminal #1 and terminal 3# at the factory.

Also, when connecting the bare or green wires to the "GR" terminal, it is best to wirenut the wires together with a pigtail, then connect the pigtail to the "GR" (GRound) terminal, WHICH IS THE GREEN SCREW ON THE LOWER PART OF THE CASE.

WIRING THE TIMER:
The wiring diagram for the T103 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T103.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING 120/240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES (scenario #3):

Incoming (LINE) wires from 240 volt circuit breaker:
Connect the black (LINE)(hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the red (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #3. Connect the white (neutral in this case) wire to terminal "A".
Connect the bare equipment grounding wire to the "GR" terminal, which is the green screw on the case.

Outgoing wires to 240 volt load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. The bare or green wire goes to the "GR" terminal.
___________________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T103 USING AN INCOMING _120_ VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #1):

Incoming wires from 120 volt breaker or source:
Black (LINE) to terminal #3. White (neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

Terminals #1 and #2 are NOT used in this case.

Outgoing wires to 120 volt load(s):
Black(hot) to terminal #4. White(neutral) to terminal "A". Bare to the "GR" terminal.

The wiring diagram for the T104 is here:
http://www.progressive-growth.com/wiring/T104.pdf
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 3 WIRES (scenario #2):

Incoming (LINE) wires from breaker:
Connect the black (LINE) (hot) wire to terminal #1. Connect the white (LINE) (hot in this case) to terminal #3. Connect the bare wire to the "GR" terminal.

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.

Outgoing wires to load:
Connect one (hot) wire to terminal #2 and the other (hot) wire to terminal #4. Connect the bare or green wire to terminal "GR".

The "A" terminal is _NOT_ used.
______________________________________________________________
WIRING THE T104 USING AN INCOMING 240 VOLT CABLE WITH 4 WIRES:
Same as above, except the white wire is not used. Just tape or wirenut it off.

on Dec 28, 2009 | Hardware & Accessories

1 Answer

Samsung Dryer Issue


Is this Dryer in the US? It sounds like it may be as you are refering to a Phase Voltage of 120 volts and a Line Voltage of 240 v.
therefore it sounds like your machine is 3 Phase and in the past you have been wired as 3 Phase and Neutral (4 Pin), it could be that your 3 pin socket at the new location is only 3 Phase ( no Neural ) in which case you may have applied twice the voltage to the control circuit which should be only 120 volts in your case, check on the PCB of the control circuit for any fuse which may have operated, otherwise there may be power supply issues due to applying over voltage in the absence of a Neutral :-(

Feb 21, 2015 | Samsung DV218AEW Front Load Electric Dryer

1 Answer

How to tell differance between 110 volts and 220 volts


u have to use a volt meter to find out for sure. if ur asking how to check it, u find the leads coming into it and take ur volt meter leads and if u have colored wires coming into it like black, red, white, green or bare which is ground. u check the volts by checking the volts 1st on ea of the colors. u should have 120 volts from ea color to ground, then u check volts between the colors. put ur leads to the red, black at the same time and u should have 240 volts. the colors may be black, white, and bare or ground. in this case treat the blk, and white as black and red.

May 26, 2014 | Intermatic T104 24h 208-277v Mechanical...

1 Answer

Can u help me please we're do the brown grey and white with pink line wires go


Four-Wire: Green

The green wire is the ground wire, and it is the difference between a three-wire and a four-wire cord. (In the three-wire system, the ground wire and the neutral wire are the same.) The green wire connects to the dryer frame. Look at the cord-connection terminals on the back of the dryer. Very close by, you should see a screw sticking out of the metal panel. It will be labeled "external ground connector" or something similar. Connect the green wire to that screw.

Four-Wire: Black

Most appliances in your house run on 120 volts of electricity, some on 240 volts. The dryer needs both--240 volts to run the drum and heating element, and 120 volts to run the timer, thermostat and other components. For this reason, the dryer cord has two live or "hot" wires--one black, one red--rather than a single hot wire. The dryer draws 120 volts from each hot wire to get the 240 volts it needs for the heavy work, then pairs one hot wire with the neutral wire for the 120 volts to run the smaller functions. Look again at the connection terminals on the back of the dryer. There should be three screws in a horizontal row. Connect the black hot wire to the terminal on the left.

Four-Wire: Red

Connect the other hot wire, the red wire, to the terminal on the right. (In truth, you could connect either hot wire to either hot terminal, but it's standard procedure to put the black on the left and the red on the right, so do so.)

Four-Wire: White

The white is the neutral wire, and it connects to the center terminal. There may be a metal strap attached to this terminal. That's a ground strap. When a three-wire cord is attached, it serves the same function as the ground screw mentioned above.

Three-Wire: Gray

If you have a three-wire cord, then all three wires will be gray. They're arranged side-by-side with the hot wires on the outside and the neutral wire in the middle. Attach the hot wires to the left and right terminals and the neutral wire to the center terminal. Make sure the ground strap is attached to the center terminal.

Nov 20, 2012 | Dryers

1 Answer

T103 clock not working


Please read all of this post. You may burn up the 120 volt T103 timer motor is you are not careful.

The statement: "I have 120v board with 120 constant and 240 timed" is not very clear to me as to what you mean.

In US residential wiring, the white wire is not always the "neutral;" The white wire is sometimes used for 240 volt circuits.

We cannot tell you how to wire your timer unless we know _exactly_ what you have.

If your incoming supply cable (from the breaker box) has 3 wires (black, white, and bare), there are two scenarios:

1...If the voltage from black (hot) to white (ALSO hot in this case) is 240 volts, and you have only 3 wires (black, white, and bare), then the T103 is the _wrong_ timer if you are trying to control a 240 volt load. You should use a T104 timer.

The T104 uses a 240 volt timer motor and the T103 uses a 120 volt timer motor.

2...If the voltage between black and white is 120 volts, then you will only be able to control 120 volt loads; then the incoming black supply wire is connected to terminal 3 and the white (neutral) wire is connected to the "A" terminal. The bare equipment grounding wire is then connected to the "GR" terminal.

To show the difference, if you are trying to control a 240 volt load, to use a T103 and wire it _correctly_, you would need to have a incoming supply cable with a total of 4 wires (black, red, white (neutral), and bare) Black to red would be 240 volts. Black to white would be 120 volts. Red to white would be 120 volts.
The connections would be as follows:
White (neutral in this case) to the "A" terminal
Black to terminal 1
Red to terminal 3
The 240 volt load would then connect to terminals 2 and 4
Both the bare equipment grounding wires are connected to the "GR" terminal.

Since you did not mention a red wire, I can only ASSUME that this is not the case.

Sorry, we can't tell you how to wire this timer based upon assumptions.

So, what do you have?


Dec 23, 2009 | Intermatic T103 Indoor 120-Volt 40-amp...

1 Answer

Heater is not heating up.


First, is this a 120 VAC or 240 VAC heater? 120 VAC heater will usually have one Black & one White wire and 240 VAC heater will usually have two Black wires or one Black & one Red wire. If it is a 120 VAC heater then you need to supply the white wire at the heater with a neutral (white) wire from the breaker panel. If it is a 240 VAC heater then you need to verify that you have 240 VAC at the heater from Black lead to Red lead. If you are not sure about how to do this please have an experienced electrician look at it so you don't get electrocuted and/or burn up your new heater. Hope this helps!

Dec 09, 2008 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

1 Answer

I am trying tochange my


This is common issue. Due to some building codes the 3-prong configuration is no longer used in homes. The wiring is similar with one exception. The 4-wire plug uses an additional (WHITE) NEUTRAL wire.

Here's a brief explanation of how the plugs are configured:

Dryer 3 prong wire configuration:

RED - 120 VAC
GREEN - GROUND
BLACK - 120 VAC

Dryer 4 prong wire configuration:

RED - 120 VAC
GREEN - GROUND
BLACK - 120 VAC
WHITE - NEUTRAL

BOTH plugs provide the SAME source voltages to your appliance:

220 VAC - provided across the RED and BLACK leads are what drives your heating circuitry.
120 VAC - usually tapped of the BLACK wire is used to run the drive motor and timer on MOST dryers.

The wire terminal block in the back of the dryer should have a black, white, and red wire running to it from the dryer wiring harness. With the 4 prong plug, simply attach the BLACK, WHITE and RED wires at the terminal block ensuring that you match the RED and BLACK wires as they are configured and attach the WHITE wire at the remaining terminal lug. Make sure you screw them all down securely. Attach the remaining GREEN wire to chassis (dryer frame) ground. I hope this helps you.

Feb 29, 2008 | Dryers

1 Answer

REPLACING DRYER 4 PRONG PLUG


This is common issue. Due to some building codes the 3-prong configuration is no longer used in homes. The wiring is similiar with one exception. The 4-wire plug uses an additonal (WHITE) NEUTRAL wire.

Here's a brief explanation of how the plugs are configured:

Dryer 3 prong wire configuration:

RED - 120 VAC
GREEN - GROUND
BLACK - 120 VAC

Dryer 4 prong wire configuration:

RED - 120 VAC
GREEN - GROUND
BLACK - 120 VAC
WHITE - NEUTRAL

BOTH plugs provide the SAME source voltages to your appliance:

220 VAC - provided across the RED and BLACK leads are what drives your heating circuitry.
120 VAC - usually tapped of the BLACK wire is used to run the drive motor and timer on MOST dryers.

The wire terminal block in the back of the dryer should have a black, white, and red wire running to it from the dryer wiring harness. With the 4 prong plug, simply attach the BLACK, WHITE and RED wires at the terminal block ensuring that you match the RED and BLACK wires as they are configured and attach the WHITE wire at the remaining terminal lug. Make sure you screw them all down securely. Attach the remaining GREEN wire to chassis (dryer frame) ground. I hope ths helps you.

Feb 14, 2008 | Dryers

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