Question about Sunpak 622 Super Pro TTL Flash

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Sunpak 622 Recycle Time w/ Batteries vs AD-26

I own a Sunpak 622, and normally use rechargeable NiMH "C" batteries. I regularly have a recycle time of 5.5 sec. at full (1/1) power. Seeking faster recycle times, I purchased the Sunpak AD-26 AC Adapter. Using the adapter, I consistently have a recycle time of 18.4 sec. at full (1/1) power. I'm unable to understand why a constant power source, such as an ac adapter, seems to have less current/power/oomph/or whatever than a set of rechargeable "C" batteries.

That is my situation. I'd like to know if there is a way to "fix" this, and if this is common?

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  • Anonymous Mar 20, 2014

    Need SunPak AC Adapter AD-27

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I have made Nimh pack which has 2900MAH cells and is very fast recycling.But beware that it will heat up Xenon(it needs cool down time before you fire full power repeatedly.Also its capacitor will be short life due to electrolytic(Same as fast battery chargers ruins the battery life).
And when its production is seized,I care it more.

Posted on Mar 30, 2010

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I had the same problem - 10-11 secs on 240VAC. My solution was to get the Quantum Turbo SC for $450. It yields ~3sec recycle times. This pack for $150 should play nicely as well: http://www.adorama.com/JTMBPN.html?searchinfo=jtl+lancer+battery+pck It was out of stock at the time. The Sunpak TR2000 is $250, but it's Ni-Cd while the others are NiMH. There are other HV packs capable of powering the 622 w/ the fitting cable like Lumedyne IIRC. The AD-26 is still useful for non-action photography. The fastest time I saw posted is 1.5 secs, but it's a DIY job (search 'sunpak 622' on flickr). HTH,
Szilard

Posted on Jun 03, 2009

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How long do i charge a sunpak nc 510 rechargeable using a QBC-5 CHARGER


Sunpak uses different power sources on their high-power handle mount (a.k.a. hammerhead) flash guns. The most common is the battery basket that holds 4 or 6 AA or C batteries depending on the type of the unit. One can insert Nickel-Cadmium or Nickel-Metal-Hydride rechargeable batteries instead of the primary cells, this way reducing the "consumables" costs at the expense of the smaller number of flashes per battery set. (Actually, NiCd or NiMH cells would probably give smaller number of flashes compared with the alkaline cells, but the recycle time between the flashes can be shorter. The reason is that at charging the flash capacitor inside the flash current counts more than voltage. Sunpak sells Ni-Cd battery packs named CL-2 for their flashes that utilize 6 AA-cells, and CL-3 for their 622 series (4 C-cells). The charger for these is the QBC-5. It recharges the exhausted batteries in 3 hours. As a solution assuring the shortest duration between flashes Sunpak offered the Powerpak, a shoulder holster that held a dry (non-rechargeable) battery of 510V, it charged the flash capacitor directly, omitting the transistor inverter in the flash body. As such battery became obsolete, the Poverpak has been superseded with the NC510 and later the TR-II PAK, which utilizes 10 Ni-Cd rechargeable batteries as a power source, and a powerful (more capable than the one in the flash) transistor inverter. NC510 and TR-II PAK use the same connection to the flash and the same outlook as the original Powerpak but, being rechargeable, are more economical. QBC-5 also serves a charger for the NC510 and TR-II PAK. You may ask, how the same charger can be used for 4, 6 and 10 cell NiCd packs. Well, the charger is specially designed for that, although charging time differs at the different battery packs. The NC510 and the TR-II PAK needs 10 hours to be recharged, when exhausted. The best way to avoid damages (overcharging degrades NiCd and NiMH cells) is to check temperature of the batteries. Charging must be cut off if the battery becomes hotter than 45 ?C (115 ?F). If after 10 hours of charge the NC510 does not power (the otherwise working) flash, then it must be serviced. Replacing the batteries is an easy job that can be done at home, with some soldering skills; NiMH cells with solder tabs are available at many web-based supplyers. Don't solder the cells directly, heat damages them. Avoid touching parts inside, when the pack is turned on: electrocuting is fully possible. Better find a professional, if you are not familiar with the electronics.

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Does this camera operate on regular AA bateries. Put 2 brand new ones in and it will not power up. The manual says Kodak does not "support" Alkaline batteries....


Probably this old chat may help you to resolve your problem.
From site:
http://www.digitalcamera-hq.com/products/kodak-easyshare-c663

Kodak EasyShare C663 Specifications
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chrissy66 (12/10/2007)reply to this comment (by James DeRuvo - 12/12/2007)Sounds to me like your lens may have come out of alignment. Was it dropped recently? Since your camera is still under warranty, the best thing you can do is have Kodak should fix it. If your camera is out of warranty, or if Kodak refuses to repair it for free, the one thing you can try is to try resetting the camera.

Kodak is also of the opinion that lens errors also occur when you use batteries not recommended by Kodak.

I recently chatted with a kodak specialist about this issue and he recommends changing your batteries to NiMh rechargeable batteries. These are the batteries that the camera is designed to use and using other types - like alkalines, can often cause the lens error to occur. If that doesn't work, then the camera indeed does need repair.

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