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Dual Boot with 2 hard drives

I have two hard drives on my laptop and I am currently running Vista. I was curious about trying to run Windows 7 on my system also. Do I need to run it on my first hard drive or can I install it on my second hard drive which is currently listed as the Logical Drive (although they are both NTFS).

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You can run it on either hard drive but I would recommend that you put it on the same drive as vista

Posted on May 14, 2009

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Is it possible to install windows xp 2 when there is already windows 7 is installed.i want to install both os running in my dell vostro 1015 laptop,


Yes you will have to format your drive and remove partitions, then create new partitions and add a boot up option menu. Then when you power on your computer it will ask if you want to boot Windows 7, or Windows XP. You will have to have both copies of Windows also your restore partition can't do this.

Aug 12, 2011 | Dell Vostro 1510 Laptop

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Steps to remove Windows 7 without affecting saved files or data: 1. Boot up and...


<span> <p>To format your hard disk during Windows 7 <a href="http://www.whitecanyon.com/how-to-format-computer.php#">installation</a>, you'll need to start, or boot, your computer using the Windows 7 installation disc or USB flash drive.<br /> <ol> <li>Turn on your computer so that Windows starts normally, insert the Windows 7 installation disc or USB flash drive, and then shut down your computer.<br /><br /></li> <li>Restart your computer.<br /><br /></li> <li>Press any key when prompted, and then follow the instructions that appear.<br /><br /></li> <li>On the <b>Install Windows</b> page, enter your language and other preferences, and then click <b>Next</b>.<br /> <ul> <li>If the <b>Install Windows</b> page doesn't appear, and you're not asked to press any key, you might need to change some system settings. To learn how to do this, see <a href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Start-your-computer-from-a-Windows-7-installation-disc-or-USB-flash-drive">Start your computer from a Windows 7 installation disc or US</a></li> <li><a href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Start-your-computer-from-a-Windows-7-installation-disc-or-USB-flash-drive">flash drive</a>.</li></ul></li> <li>On the <b>Please read the license terms</b> page, if you accept</li></ol> <ol> <li> the license terms, click <b>I accept the license terms</b>, and then click <b>Next</b>.<br /><br /></li> <li>On the <b>Which type of installation do you want?</b> page, click <b>Custom</b>.<br /><br /></li> <li>On the <b>Where do you want to install Windows?</b> page, click <b>Drive options (advanced)</b>.<br /><br /></li> <li>Click the partition that you want to format and click <b>Format</b>.</li> <li> <ul> <li>If you have more than one partition on this hard drive and want to get rid them to make one big drive again, then select a partition and click on the <b>Delete</b> option for each partition. Once you have deleted all of the partitions, select thepartition and click <b>Format</b>.</li> <li><br /></li></ul></li> <li>Pick the formatting option that you want.<br /><br /></li> <li>When you've finished formatting, click <b>Next</b>.<br /><br /></li> <li>Follow the instructions to finish installing Windows 7, which include naming your computer and setting up an initial user account.<br /> <ul> <li>If you do not want to reinstall Windows 7, you can cancel the installation at this point and keep your newly formatted drives.</li></ul></li></ol></span>

on Nov 25, 2010 | Computers & Internet

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How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





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If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

..how to dual boot a Hard disk drive in windows 7.


Step 1: Create/Obtain an Installation Disc Yes, we're all aware most motherboards these days allow you to boot from a USB flash drive, but setting that up is a guide in itself. We're going to assume that you either already have a Windows 7 DVD, or have an ISO file. If the former is true, feel free to skip ahead to Step 2.
To create a Windows 7 disc, pop a blank DVD into your burner, and burn it as an image file with any of the countless apps that can handle ISOs. Our personal favorite is ImgBurn, but to name some others: Burn4Free CD and DVD, CDBurnerXP and Ashampoo Burning Studio Free.
Step 2: Create a New Partition Editor's note: Before continuing I'd like to take a moment to acknowledge the fact that data corruption is a possibility. Even though this guide is absolutely harmless, random software anomalies can and do occur - do yourself a favor and backup your precious data before proceeding. Moving on to more pressing matters, we will need to create unallocated disk space by resizing an existing partition in your current hard drive, and then create a new partition on that free space for Windows 7 to run on. Most of you who are reading this will probably only have one existing partition, dedicated to the operating system you're currently using.
With that in mind, to help you in the process of creating a new partition we'll be looking at two separate approaches. While Windows Vista has built-in utilities to resize active partitions, XP does not, and thus we must resort to using a third party application (GParted).

Create a New Partition on Windows Vista If you are currently running Windows Vista as your primary operating system, we can use its built-in tools to modify your hard drive partitions. You can also use a third-party tool called GParted, which we are recommending to Windows XP users (see below). You can skip to the XP section and follow the exact same directions if you prefer the GParted route for any reason. On Windows Vista, click Start and enter "diskmgmt.msc" into the search bar. A window titled "Disk Management" should open displaying basic information about the drives attached to your PC.
Right click the partition on "Disk 0" and select "Shrink Volume".

Feb 26, 2011 | Acer Computers & Internet

Tip

Install Windows 7 or Windows Vista on a Pc Without DVD Media


For user who doesn’t want to waste a DVD disc to burn the ISO to physical media, and does not have WinPE (Windows PE) startup disc, here’s a workaround method to install Windows Vista and Windows 7 into physical computer’s hard disk drive or partition (volume) directly with ISO without writing or burning to disc. The without-disc installation method is useful especially during beta and RC period of new operating system in the making, where the new build and new versionis launching and publishing every now and then. This tutorial guide assumes that the new Windows 7 or Windows Vista will be installed and replaced the original existing operating system currently installed. The instructions can be modified slightly (mainly on hard disk partition used) to fit into need of readers who want to have a dual-boot, multi-boot, or simply just to upgrade install to new OS.

1. Install a virtual CD/DVD drive on existing Windows operating system.
2. Mount the Windows Vista or Windows 7 installation DVD ISO image using the virtual drive.
3. Copy all files inside the virtual CD/DVD drive mounted with the ISO into any folder on any partition or hard disk drive not going to be used to install the Windows OS. For example, copy into E:\Windows7.
4. Copy the bootmgr and boot folders nested inside the copied folder (i.e. \Windows7) to root directory of system boot drive, typically C:\.

Note: For Windows Vista, users may need to use this step: Copy the bootmgr folder from E:\Windows7 to C:\ root directory, copy E:\Windows7\boot\boot.sdi file to same folder in C:\boot folder, and then copy bootsect.exe from the E:\Windows7\boot\ folder to C:\ drive.

Note: boot folder in system boot drive is hidden system folder.
5. Create a new folder named sources under the C:\ root folder.
6. Copy the boot.win file inside \Windows7\sources folder to the source folder created in the system boot drive, normally C:\.
7. Open a command prompt as administrator.
8. Run the following command (change the C to your drive path letter if applicable):

C:\boot\bootsect.exe /nt60 C:

For Windows Vista users who copied bootsect.exe to C:\ root folder, use the following command instead:

C:\bootsect.exe /nt60 C:

A successful message is the command completes successfully.
9. Change the name or label of the boot system partition local disk to BDCP or any name you prefer that easier to remember and type (in DOS command promot, use label command).
10. Restart the computer.
11. After booting up, the system will start the corresponding Windows installation process. Select the applicable language to install, time and currency format (regional settings locale) and keyboard or input method in the installation wizard dialog.
12. On the next screen, user will be presented with option to Install Windows. DO NOT press on Install Windows button, instead, click on Repair My Computer link on the bottom left corner.
13. In the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) System Recovery Options dialog window, click on Command Prompt to open a DOS Prompt window.
14. Run the format command to format the primary hard disk or partition to clean state:

format c: /q

Note: /q switch, which perform quick format can be omitted to full format. And if existing hard disk partition is of FAT32 filesystem format, use format c: /q /fs:ntfs to convert the file system to NTFS while formatting. Before formatting begins, the command may prompt for hard disk drive or partition label name, if so, enter accordingly (i.e. BDCP).
15. After format completed, start the Windows Vista or Windows 7 installation process again by manually running the setup.exe located in the copied. Note that the setup.exe is not the one located on boot system drive which copied at later step, as the boot drive has been formatted. For example:

E:\Windows7\sources\setup.exe
16. Continue with installation procedures by following on-screen instructions as per normal practice.

on May 19, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to make dual boot with window xp vista and windows 7


Dual booting Windows is the most challenging of the three options; however, making it work can be very rewarding. The process of creating a dual boot environment differs from Windows Vista to XP. Please follow the instructions according to which version of Windows you are currently using.
To run two operating systems on your computer, you will need to add a second partition. If you are not familiar with adding a partition, you can learn how in this section. Please note: each operating system will be able to see the other partition; thus, you can share files between them.

Dual Boot with window x and windows 7

You will need third party software to create a second partition for Windows 7; once you have created the partition, you can install Windows 7 on it.

Create a New Partition (Vista)

Click the Start button, right click Computer, and clickManage

In the left pane, click Disk Management

Now create a new partition by shrinking a previous volume so you can use the newly created space. Right click on the partition and clickShrink Volume.

Now right click the free space and click New Simple Volume…
Specify the volume size and click Next

Format the drive as NTFS, give it a label, and click Next

Power on your computer, insert the Windows 7 DVD, and restart your computer

Press the necessary key to initiate booting from your DVD (usually Esc or F12.)

Windows will now load the installation files.

Click Install now
Your computer will restart several times during the process as it configures itself and installs updates Be sure to leave the DVD in the drive and let Windows take care of itself.


Memory (RAM) – 1.25 GB required, 2 GB memory recommended.
Recommended 15 GB hard disk space per virtual Windows environment.
NB: Windows XP Mode is only available in Windows 7 Enterprise, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate.

on May 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

HP DV5 laptop extremely hot in Vista not Windows 7


hps are born hot. an undercooler board would help.

Jul 23, 2009 | HP Pavilion dv5-1002us Laptop PC

1 Answer

2 operating systems


The Boot Configuration Data (BCD) store contains boot configuration parameters and controls how the operating system is started in Microsoft®Windows Vista.
Remove Windows Vista From Dual Boot System Windows Vista works slightly different from earlier versions of Windows when installed on a dual boot system, in that it has a completely different boot loader.
When Windows Vista is first installed as a dual boot operating system a new boot folder is added to the root directory of your PC. This is a hidden file and therefore is not noticed. When you boot your PC a menu appears with the following options:
  • Earlier versions of Windows
  • Windows Vista
Clicking the Windows Vista option will boot the PC into Windows Vista. If, however, you select the earlier versions of Windows option, another menu will appear from which you can choose Windows XP or whatever earlier version - Windows 2000 or Windows 2003 server - you installed first.
Because of this new boot loader it is not as easy to remove Vista from a dual boot system scenario. Simply deleting the Vista partition will, of course, remove Windows Vista, but, unfortunately, it will not remove the Windows Vista boot loader. For this reason, if you simply delete the Windows Vista partition, on rebooting your machine you will not automatically boot into Windows XP (or an earlier version). Instead you will once again be presented with a menu from which you have to choose which operating system you wish to boot to.
Obviously, once you have removed the boot loader and rebooted the Vista operating system will still be on the partition you originally installed it on. To remove Vista completely you will need to Delete the partition that Windows Vista was installed upon.
To remove this menu, or more to the point, the boot loader, proceed as follows:
1/ Boot the PC to Windows Vista
2/ Ensure you are logged onto the Internet and then download the freeware boot loader utility VistaBootPro (www.vistabootpro.org)
3/ Once you have downloaded VistaBootPro, install it on your machine
4/ During Install VistaBootPro will install an icon on your desktop
5/ Locate the VistaBootPro icon and Right Click on it. Then, from the drop down menu, Click on the Run As Administrator option
6/ User Account Control (UAC) will pop up and ask for permission to run the program
7/ After you have given UAC permission - you must be the administrator or have administrator privileges - VistaBootPro will run.
8/ Once VistaBootPro opens, Click on the Bootloader tab
9/ In the Bootloader Maintenance section, Click on the Radio button next to the option marked 'Uninstall the Vista Bootloader (Used to restore Legacy OS) option' and then Click the Apply button
10/ Finally Reboot your PC
11/ On rebooting your machine you will boot directly into Windows XP (or an earlier operating system). No menu will appear.
12/ All that is left to do now is to delete the partition which originally contained Windows Vista. (Assuming you wish to remove the Vista partition from your hard drive).

Sep 12, 2008 | Acer Aspire 3680 Laptop

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.
Step 0: Download the Windows 7 Beta and Burn It to a DVD
Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.

Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive
Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP
To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.
To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista
The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.
Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space.
Step 2: Install Windows 7
Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).
Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.)
After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.
Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.

on Dec 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

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