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I need a wiring diagram for the switch and circuit breaker on a hitachi c10ra2 table saw

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Go here for owners manual. Or use contact to request wiring diagram:

http://www.hitachipowertools.ca/en/Products?cat=37&pid=183

Posted on Jun 20, 2009

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1 Answer

How to bypass thermal circuit breaker switch on hitachi c10fl table saw


no advice as the switch is there for a purpose
fix the motor properly

Aug 21, 2016 | Hitachi Saws

1 Answer

I need a schematic diagram for the wiring for a my


I don't believe any such diagrams exist for the public.

But , based on the following assumptions:
1. There are three wires coming out of the motor: Black, White and Green.
2. There is a single pole (spst) or double pole (dpst) switch that attaches to the saw chassis.

I can make the following conclusions:
You need a suitable 10-3 rubber coated power cord 8 or 10 feet long with a plug with ground that also has three wires the same color as the leads coming from the motor.
You will probably need to cut off a suitable section of the power cord to go from the switch mounting location to the motor. I'm not familiar with the saw but lets say 2' to 3' long. This wire should not be stretched at any point or loose enough that it would get caught on objects easily. Where the wire goes through holes in the saw base, those holes must have grommets or strain reliefs to protect the wire from abrasion and wear on the insulation.
The black wire ends from the motor and from the cord to the plug are to be routed through the switch so that operating the switch interrupts/connects current through the black wire.
If the switch is a double-pole switch, then the white leads are also attached to the second set of connectors on the switch. If the switch is single-pole, then the ends of the white wires are twisted together and connected with a suitable sized wire nut. The connection with the wire nut is then tightly wrapped with electrical tape. If the chassis where the switch is mounted is plastic or non-conductive, then the ends of the green wires are twisted together and connected with a wire nut, in the same way as the white wires, then wrapped tightly with electrical tape. If the switch is mounted to a conductive surface, then a 6" green pigtail wire is to be included in the wire nut binding the two green wires and the other end of the pigtail is to be fastened to the same conductive surface the switch is mounted on. All connections are to be contained in a suitable box and not exposed with a lid fastened in place.
The wires on the other end of the 2' to 3' lead is to be fastened similarly to the leads in the motor and the motor electrical cover plate must cover all connections.

The above instructions apply only if the assumptions listed at the beginning are correct. In any case, all wiring should be approved by a licensed electrician.


Oct 01, 2014 | Saws

1 Answer

Circuit breaker trips out


What is the rating of the breaker? Is this enough to run the saw? If this is ok, has the motor become damaged or has the blade got dirt or wood dust slowing it down?

Jul 25, 2014 | Hitachi C10FR 10" Job-Site Table Saw 15...

1 Answer

Electricity went out in 1 circuit while using my table saw w/washer going. I replaced the breaker & have 240 volts comming out of it but no electricity to receptacles or switches, So I replaced all...


In workshop areas, the NEC specifies GFCI (ground fault circuit interruptor) outlets.
If you replaced any GFCI outlets, there could be 2 possible problems:
(1) modern GFCI outlets will pass zero voltage if wired backwards (i.e. a load/feed reversal).
check the load/feed wiring of all GFCI outlets, to make sure its correct.
The feed side of the GFCI outlet is wired directly to the breaker, and the load side feeds power
to the remainder (the downstream side) of the circuit (therefore protecting the entire downstream
side of the circuit).
(2) older GFCI outlets could need to be reset if wired correctly - check the reset button(s) just to
make sure that they (and any downstream outlets) are receiving voltage.
Assuming that no GFCI outlets were part of the replacement process (or that your GFCI outlets
are correctly wired), your check for the presence of 240 VAC
should begin at the outlet/switch closest to the 240VAC double pole breaker, and proceed from there (looking for that 240VAC at each device with your 2-prong tester) along to the end
of the circuit until the problem is identified.
What this implies is that you have created (or will create) a schematic or circuit diagram of the
circuit involved - including switches, wires, and outlets (240V and 120V) - and then use that as a
resource to trace the possible sources of the problem from the breaker to the problem.
Here's the question I would want you to answer as you create your circuit diagram:
How did a 240V table saw get on the same circuit as a 120V washer and/or 120V switch(es)?
It seems like during the process of circuit tracing/diagram creation, you may find
that you're dealing with parts of more than 1 circuit, rather than just one. Check the breaker box
for any breakers that are in the "Tripped" position - and diagram those circuit(s) too.
What I would suspect is a wiring problem/mistake with the 1st device (switch or outlet) that is
supposed to feed power to the rest of the circuit, but fails to pass power on to the remainder of the circuit - or that that first device is actually wired to a second circuit with a tripped breaker.

Another thing to check is that your shop may be on its own sub-panel, with the table saw
on a 240VAC circuit, and the washer on its own 120VAC circuit. In this case, the
total curent draw may have tripped the MAIN breaker to this sub-panel in the MAIN breaker
panel (i.e. none of the breakers in the sub-panel were tripped, but the main breaker feeding the
ENTIRE sub-panel tripped, and this (double pole) breaker is located in the MAIN breaker panel).
In this case, the fix would be to reset the double pole breaker in the main panel that feeds the
shop sub-panel, bringing all the sub-panel circuits on line.

The last thing to suspect/check for is a fault in the wire itself, which is the most difficult problem to
diagnose. The fix to a bad wire would be re-fishing a new wire from the breaker box to the 1st
device box - no electrical inspector will require the removal of old wires from walls - so long as they
are not live.
What would make your life alot easier, and what helps electricians diagnose these problems so
quickly, is an electrical field tester (a.k.a. "chirper" tester), which would allow you to check
the wire as it leaves the breaker box to the point where the electrical field disappears.
At the point (point in the wire/outlet/switch) where the chirper stops chirping, you've found your
fault. At Home Depot/Lowe's/electrical supply store, a electrical field tester will set you back
about $8 to $20, depending on whether you opt for one that just lights an LED, or one that
lights and LED and also chirps.

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Table saw overheats triping braber. have cleaned contacts and tighten the conections on the side of the saw.


Usually a saw that size will have it's own breaker built in, is this the one that is tripping? Or is it the one on the wall? Either way, a dull blade will make the saw work harder, and heat up faster, Mine trips off now and then, always from a dull blade. It has a built in breaker in the switch. Are you running it with a cord? Make sure it is heavy enough, a small cord will steal amperage from the circuit turning a 20 amp breaker into a 15. Hope this helps.

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My husband lost the safety key for our Hitachi Table Saw Model Number C10FR. This saw is discontinued and the customer service department at Hitachi will not return phone calls or E mails. Can anyone...


I found Hitachi customer service to be quite helpful in replacing my safety switch for my C10RA2 table saw. My C10RA2 has a fixed metal stand, not the folding stand, and the part number for the red safety switch or key is 531-992R, while the switch itself is part number 314-459. If you have the folding stand the part number for the switch is 321-620 and the safety key is 321-621. Hitachi customer service in US: 1-800-706-7337. I am going to buy two or three! Almost lost a table saw over a cheap plastic part.

Dec 27, 2010 | Hitachi C10FR 10" Job-Site Table Saw 15...

1 Answer

The table saw shutdown where is the restart button


Usually the reset for table saw is on the motor itself
Crawl under the table and check it out & check your motor name plate (use a digital camera to photograph the name plate so you can see it large on your computer and have a record of that information)
Look for oil caps at the bearing ends of motor, to see if your motor can be oiled using 3-in-1 oil

If your saw is shutting down, you may not have enough electricity for the motor
Look at motor name plate for volts amps or watts.
Now figure how much electricity your saw need using the formula Volts x Amps = Watts

Next, look at the circuit breaker and size wire
15Amp breaker = 1440+watts
You can figure the breaker load using V X A = W

Next look at your wire going to table saw
14 gauge wire for 15 amp breaker
12 gauge wire for 20 amp breaker
10 gauge wire for 30 amp breaker

You might benefit by running bigger wire to the saw. And adding some oil in the oil caps.
I oiled my table saw and then ran a dedicated 30Amp wire to it, and it runs real good for a 25-year-old craftsman.

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Hitachi c10fr table saw wiring diagram


Here is a hand drawn diagram

9a7a522.jpg
Please rate this a fixya

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It sounds like you are wiring the switch wrong. Give me the model # and I will look for a wiring diagram for you.

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