Question about MSI P4MAM2-V Motherboard

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MSI P4MAM2-V BIOS

When the POST is run, it finds the drives then reports:   Primary IDE channel no 80 conductor cable installed Secondry IDE channel no 80 conductor cable installed   What does this mean

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  • Anonymous Aug 16, 2008

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Check your Ide data cable it seems 40 pin conductor cable .

Replace them with 80 pin conductor cable.your problen\m has gone.

Posted on Oct 13, 2007

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How to install 80 conductor cable? because when i turn on my computer it displays no 80 conductor cable installed


It means you're still using the 40 conductor cable from the MB IDE to the
hard drive. The 80 Conductor Cables are used to take advantage of the newer
Ultra/ATA-66 and up IDE drives. (They will still work with the 40
conductor cable, but slower.)

Jun 01, 2010 | Microsoft Computers & Internet

Tip

How to replace a hard disk drive.


Step 1: Back up and scout around
First, back up your critical files (don't forget your Outlook .PST archive) to optical discs, an external drive, or online storage. Then check whether a CD comes with the drive, providing drive-specific information and general upgrade assistance. It may also later help you copy the contents of one drive to another. Install this software first. Then, power down your PC, unplug all cables, and open the case. Next, ground yourself by touching a metal portion of the chassis.
Look inside—your first task is to determine where your new drive will go. Bays for internal drives are usually located below the wider, front-accessible bays that house CD or DVD drives. If you plan to replace your boot drive with the new drive and don't have an empty bay, your upgrade will involve more steps than we can cover here. But if you're replacing your boot drive and you have an empty bay, follow our steps for adding a second drive. After formatting it, use Norton Ghost (or a similar program) to clone your boot drive's contents to the new drive. Then, revisit steps 3 and 4 to direct your PC to boot from the new drive.
We'll be installing a SATA drive, but the process is similar for the other common drive type, IDE. SATA drives use a thin, seven-pin data cable; IDE drives use a 40-pin ribbon cable that's usually gray. If you're unsure which drive type your PC already has, check its documentation or label. Most PCs more than a year or two old employ IDE hard and optical drives, and don't support SATA unless they have a SATA PCI card installed. More-recent desktops may use (or just support) SATA drives but should support IDE, too.
Tip: If you transfer Windows XP from one drive to another, you may have to reauthorize Windows. Step 2: Examine data and power connections
Most hard drive kits include a data cable (SATA or IDE, depending on the drive), a power adapter cable (with some SATA drives), and screws. If yours doesn't include cables, you can purchase them separately.
First, the data connection. If you're installing a SATA drive as secondary storage, follow the data cable from your current drive (assuming it's SATA, too) to the other end. See if an unused SATA port lies nearby on the motherboard or an interface card. If you can't find one, consult your PC's documentation.
If you're adding an IDE drive as a second drive, you may be able to connect it to the same data cable as your primary IDE drive, or along with an IDE optical drive. Look for a third, free connector in the middle of the cable that connects your currently installed IDE drive to the motherboard. Note that some older PCs use 40-conductor IDE cables, not the 80-conductor ones current drives require. (Compare your kit cable to the one installed—the 80-conductor variety has much thinner wires.) 80-conductor cables are backward-compatible (both types use the same 40-pin connector), so you can swap out a 40-conductor cable for your kit's 80 if need be. (The "master" drive goes at the end—see step 3.)
Next, consider the power connection. Our SATA drive has a 15-pin SATA power connector. If you already have a SATA drive installed, follow its power cable (the wider of the two connectors) to see if an unused power-supply lead with the same connector is nearby. If so, earmark that lead for your new drive. If it can't reach the empty bay, see if any bundled adapters help.
Some SATA drives also support familiar legacy Molex four-pin power connectors—you can use a Molex or SATA connector. If so, hunt for a free Molex-style lead. Still no match? Then you'll need an adapter, such as a Molex-to-SATA adapter (some kits bundle one), or a Y-adapter that splits a lead in two.
IDE drives are simpler: They always use Molex connectors. You just need a free Molex-style lead (or a Y-splitter). Step 3: Mount and connect the drive
When installing SATA drives, jumper settings usually aren't an issue. That's not true of IDE, where a jumper indicates whether a drive is a primary ("master") or secondary ("slave") drive. Check its documentation for the proper setting. If your PC has only one IDE hard drive, it's probably set to "master." Assuming you chain another IDE drive off its cable, the new drive should be set to "slave." (You'll later have to change the jumper to "master"—and attach the drive to the cable's end—if you remove the original boot drive and make the new drive the boot drive.) Another option: Set both IDE drives on an 80-conductor cable to the Cable Select (CSEL) jumper setting. The PC will determine master/slave status according to the drives' placement on the cable ("master" at the end, "slave" in the middle).
Next, look at your current hard drive to see if mounting rails are attached to its sides. If so, screw a set onto the new drive (look inside the case for spares), then slide the drive into its bay. Otherwise, screw it directly into the bay. Four screws are sufficient. Usually, the label side points up; mimic the boot drive.
Attach one end of the SATA data cable (which is keyed for correct insertion) to a SATA port on the motherboard or interface card, the other to the drive. IDE data cables, also keyed, usually have a red stripe that lines up with the "pin 1" marking on the drive.
Next, plug the power-supply lead (keyed, too) that you scouted out in step 2 into the drive, including any necessary extender or adapter. Then close the case. Step 4: Configure the BIOS
Next, boot into your PC's BIOS-setup utility to verify that it recognizes the new drive and positions it correctly in the drive hierarchy. (Check your PC's startup screen to determine which key launches the utility.) Once there, also check that "auto-detect" is selected for the drives, if an option. If the utility lets you select the boot order, give your intended boot drive priority over any other hard drive. This information may be under Boot Options, Boot Order, or Boot Sequence.
Save changes and exit the utility. Your PC will reboot.
Tip: Using a SATA PCI interface card? It may have its own BIOS to check. Step 5: Partition and format your hard drive
Our PC runs Windows XP, which lets you partition and format drives within Windows. Older Windows versions, such as 98 and Me, make you do this from DOS.
With XP and 2000, though, use Windows' Disk Management utility. Click Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management, and choose Disk Management from the tree at left. Your new drive should appear, with a black bar indicating it isn't partitioned. Right-click the bar, and choose New Partition to launch the New Partition wizard.
Click Next, and check that Primary Partition is selected; click Next again, to the Specify Partition Size screen (don't change the partition size in the "Partition size in MB" field); and click Next to advance to another screen, on which "Assign the following drive letter" should be selected. Click Next yet again (to the Format Partition screen), and ensure that "Format this partition with the following settings" is selected and that the "File system" drop-down reads "NTFS." Click Next a final time, hit Finish, and formatting begins.
Formatting could take an hour or more, depending on drive capacity. But don't be surprised if your formatted drive has less capacity than the package claims. A 320GB drive, for instance, formats to about 300GB. Drive manufacturers advertise preformatted size, but a portion of the drive is inaccessible.

on Jul 21, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Installation of a 2nd hard drive steps & tips


Step 1: Back up and scout around

First, back up your critical files (don't forget your Outlook .PST archive) to optical discs, an external drive, or online storage. Then check whether a CD comes with the drive, providing drive-specific information and general upgrade assistance. It may also later help you copy the contents of one drive to another. Install this software first. Then, power down your PC, unplug all cables, and open the case. Next, ground yourself by touching a metal portion of the chassis.

Look inside—your first task is to determine where your new drive will go. Bays for internal drives are usually located below the wider, front-accessible bays that house CD or DVD drives. If you plan to replace your boot drive with the new drive and don't have an empty bay, your upgrade will involve more steps than we can cover here. But if you're replacing your boot drive and you have an empty bay, follow our steps for adding a second drive. After formatting it, use Norton Ghost (or a similar program) to clone your boot drive's contents to the new drive. Then, revisit steps 3 and 4 to direct your PC to boot from the new drive.

We'll be installing a SATA drive, but the process is similar for the other common drive type, IDE. SATA drives use a thin, seven-pin data cable; IDE drives use a 40-pin ribbon cable that's usually gray. If you're unsure which drive type your PC already has, check its documentation or label. Most PCs more than a year or two old employ IDE hard and optical drives, and don't support SATA unless they have a SATA PCI card installed. More-recent desktops may use (or just support) SATA drives but should support IDE, too.

Tip: If you transfer Windows XP from one drive to another, you may have to reauthorize Windows.

Step 2: Examine data and power connections


Most hard drive kits include a data cable (SATA or IDE, depending on the drive), a power adapter cable (with some SATA drives), and screws. If yours doesn't include cables, you can purchase them separately.

First, the data connection. If you're installing a SATA drive as secondary storage, follow the data cable from your current drive (assuming it's SATA, too) to the other end. See if an unused SATA port lies nearby on the motherboard or an interface card. If you can't find one, consult your PC's documentation.

If you're adding an IDE drive as a second drive, you may be able to connect it to the same data cable as your primary IDE drive, or along with an IDE optical drive. Look for a third, free connector in the middle of the cable that connects your currently installed IDE drive to the motherboard. Note that some older PCs use 40-conductor IDE cables, not the 80-conductor ones current drives require. (Compare your kit cable to the one installed—the 80-conductor variety has much thinner wires.) 80-conductor cables are backward-compatible (both types use the same 40-pin connector), so you can swap out a 40-conductor cable for your kit's 80 if need be. (The "master" drive goes at the end—see step 3.)

Next, consider the power connection. Our SATA drive has a 15-pin SATA power connector. If you already have a SATA drive installed, follow its power cable (the wider of the two connectors) to see if an unused power-supply lead with the same connector is nearby. If so, earmark that lead for your new drive. If it can't reach the empty bay, see if any bundled adapters help.

Some SATA drives also support familiar legacy Molex four-pin power connectors—you can use a Molex or SATA connector. If so, hunt for a free Molex-style lead. Still no match? Then you'll need an adapter, such as a Molex-to-SATA adapter (some kits bundle one), or a Y-adapter that splits a lead in two.

IDE drives are simpler: They always use Molex connectors. You just need a free Molex-style lead (or a Y-splitter).

Step 3: Mount and connect the drive



When installing SATA drives, jumper settings usually aren't an issue. That's not true of IDE, where a jumper indicates whether a drive is a primary ("master") or secondary ("slave") drive. Check its documentation for the proper setting. If your PC has only one IDE hard drive, it's probably set to "master." Assuming you chain another IDE drive off its cable, the new drive should be set to "slave." (You'll later have to change the jumper to "master"—and attach the drive to the cable's end—if you remove the original boot drive and make the new drive the boot drive.) Another option: Set both IDE drives on an 80-conductor cable to the Cable Select (CSEL) jumper setting. The PC will determine master/slave status according to the drives' placement on the cable ("master" at the end, "slave" in the middle).

Next, look at your current hard drive to see if mounting rails are attached to its sides. If so, screw a set onto the new drive (look inside the case for spares), then slide the drive into its bay. Otherwise, screw it directly into the bay. Four screws are sufficient. Usually, the label side points up; mimic the boot drive.

Attach one end of the SATA data cable (which is keyed for correct insertion) to a SATA port on the motherboard or interface card, the other to the drive. IDE data cables, also keyed, usually have a red stripe that lines up with the "pin 1" marking on the drive.

Next, plug the power-supply lead (keyed, too) that you scouted out in step 2 into the drive, including any necessary extender or adapter. Then close the case.

Step 4: Configure the BIOS

Next, boot into your PC's BIOS-setup utility to verify that it recognizes the new drive and positions it correctly in the drive hierarchy. (Check your PC's startup screen to determine which key launches the utility.) Once there, also check that "auto-detect" is selected for the drives, if an option. If the utility lets you select the boot order, give your intended boot drive priority over any other hard drive. This information may be under Boot Options, Boot Order, or Boot Sequence.

Save changes and exit the utility. Your PC will reboot.

Tip: Using a SATA PCI interface card? It may have its own BIOS to check.

Step 5: Partition and format your hard drive


Our PC runs Windows XP, which lets you partition and format drives within Windows. Older Windows versions, such as 98 and Me, make you do this from DOS.

With XP and 2000, though, use Windows' Disk Management utility. Click Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management, and choose Disk Management from the tree at left. Your new drive should appear, with a black bar indicating it isn't partitioned. Right-click the bar, and choose New Partition to launch the New Partition wizard.



Click Next, and check that Primary Partition is selected; click Next again, to the Specify Partition Size screen (don't change the partition size in the "Partition size in MB" field); and click Next to advance to another screen, on which "Assign the following drive letter" should be selected. Click Next yet again (to the Format Partition screen), and ensure that "Format this partition with the following settings" is selected and that the "File system" drop-down reads "NTFS." Click Next a final time, hit Finish, and formatting begins.

Formatting could take an hour or more, depending on drive capacity. But don't be surprised if your formatted drive has less capacity than the package claims. A 320GB drive, for instance, formats to about 300GB. Drive manufacturers advertise preformatted size, but a portion of the drive is inaccessible.

Dec 27, 2009 | HP Pavilion a1410n (ER890AA) PC Desktop

1 Answer

More problems lol


Hy Ashley,

First up,
Your channel 1 no 80 conductor cable,
tell me that you have mounted a new HDD to your computer,
- -
If there isn't a 80 wire cable, then the drive that came with the box was not a speedy one.
If you only have a 40 wire cable the drive will be limited to 33MB/s transfer versus 100 or 133MB/s that's possible with the 80 wire cable.

With the 40's, all the wires are signal carriers (potentially). With the 80's, there is a ground wire between each signal wire to prevent bleed over. Bleed over can affect signal integrity, cause errors, and slow down performance.

you can fix that in one of two ways(or maybe both):-):

1. Go into your BIOS, and set it to run the hard drive auto detection to make sure its not holding on to any old hard drive settings.


2. Make sure that all connections are tight. You might want to try a different cable and if you do make sure it is the 80 wire type. The connectors on the 80 wire are colored (black,blue and gray)

The part with it telling you about your CPU is just a part of the testing procedure.

kind regards
/Teis
remember to vote

Dec 12, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

REPAIR


Hello Benjamin2663,

Your error could be several things, but here is what to do to make it work....Listed in order so do them and then see if you get the error and if you do then do the next fix....

FIRST:
Load the set up defaults in the BIOS Setup. This may get it all to work.

SECOND:
Use an 80-conductor cable connected in the Primary IDE socket on the motherboard with the other end connected to the hard disk. You see you may be using an old type of cable and/or it may be connected to the secondary IDE channel. Installing the right cable in right socket will solve your problem.

THIRD:
Double check your cables and jumper settings. As long as you have confirmed them to be in their
correct positions, you go straight to the BIOS and enable Smart Drive capability for your hard drive.

Set all your drives to be Auto detected and reboot the PC.

IF the message and problem still appear you must now go to Device Manager and go to System. Open Systems and go to IDE ATA/ATAPI Controllers, and you will now see primary and secondary channels. Click on the primary channel first and open the properties box.

Next go to the advanced settings and make sure the transfer modes on device 0 and device 1 are set to DMA if available. Do the same for the secondary channel as well and allow the PC to reboot.


If all that fails, go and have your motherboard checked out for faults.

Hope this help you.

Sep 12, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

Cmos checksum error


That warning (and it's just a warning) is telling you that the IDE port can handle an 80-pin cable, but you've only got the standard 40-pin cable attached. There is no problem, but that message will always come up unless you use the faster cable. (cheap item)

The title says something about a CMOS checksum error, so i'll answer that too. That usually happens when someone has reset the BIOS back to defaults either by shorting the reset pins or by removing the battery (which looks exactly like you described).

You'll probably want to go into the BIOS and set things back up... date and time etc.

Aug 22, 2008 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Computer won't run windows and come up with a trap-handler error


on the IDE Port, set the jumpers to the hard drives/cdrom on CS(Cable Select) this lets the BIOS and the ribbon cable decide which is primary (Master) and which is secondary (Slave) on that IDE cable. if they were configured wrong you would get an error.

If the IDE channel is no good, try switching the primary and secondary IDE ribbon cables.

May 26, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

1 Answer

MS 6712 motherboard


check the cables, and if all connection pins are on the drives or on the motherboard. Not all the needed communication routs between the drives and the motherboard are working....
U can also try another IDE slot (if more than 1)
If all checks ok, try a BIOS reset... (but most probably is just the cables ...)

Jan 20, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

2 Answers

Installing a ata hard disk.


I dont quite get how you've got them connected so I'll tell you how I'd do it.

First of all, it is kind of standard to put the primary drive at the end of the cable but it doesnt really matter. I go with what ever physically works best.

Connect your 2 IDE devices to the same IDE channel (cable) unless you have 2 IDE channels then put each on their own channel or cable. Make sure you are using 60 conductor cables for each.

If both are on the same cable:
Set the dvd's jumper to slave.
Set the hard drive jumper to master
OR
vice versa.
*Some DVD burners do not like to be slave, or even on the same channel as another device.

The following is the ideal set up
If each is on their own channel (cable):
Set each to master

Be sure bios is set to auto detect for all channels, master & slaves.
** If this doesnt resolve your problem, please post a comment before rating.

Oct 17, 2007 | Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 500 GB SATA Hard...

1 Answer

ATA133 refusing to be accepted


Obviously mobo error, have you tried re setting bios from 'JBAT1' terminal, jumper from pins 1-2 to pins 2-3 then back on 1-2. Start up again and set time and select the auto detect HDD in standard bios settings see if correctly identified. save settings and restart pc

Jan 15, 2007 | Samsung SpinPoint P80 SP1604N 160 GB Hard...

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