Question about Nikon D200 Digital Camera With 18-135MM

1 Answer

I have a nikon d200, lately the shutter lags 1-2 seconds.

Despite changing iso,opening of lens still having same results the shutters stills laggin 1-2 second.
Thank you
L.c

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 55 Answers

It is probably delaying while it autofocuses.  If it is like most Canon cameras, depressing the shutter half-way should allow you to focus without taking a picture, then when the moment is right, depress the shutter button fully to take the shot.  You will want to practice this a bit to get used to it.  Shooting in low-light it can take longer to find the focus, so it becomes more necessary to use this technique.
Hopefully that helps, but I am not a Nikon user.

Posted on May 10, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

I have a Nikon D40 and when it's in M and S mode the shutter stays open for too long and my pictures come out completely white.


What shutter speed(s) are you using? What happens when you use a faster shutter speed? In the S and M modes you are responsible for setting the shutter speed, and you can set it to anything within the camera's range.

Aug 28, 2013 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

2 Answers

I have a Nikon d200 and need to take sports photos in a basketball court The sport is very fast moving. What should I set the camera to. Lately the photos are dark and or blurry


You want the fastest shutter speed you can get and the largest aperture possible.
If you're close enough and it's allowed, use the flash. The flash will freeze the action. However, it's likely to give you a dark background instead of a blurry background.
If not, use the Aperture Priority mode. Open the lens to its maximum aperture (smallest f/number). This will give you the fastest shutter speed for the existing lighting conditions. The fast shutter speed will freeze the action and the large aperture will blur the background, though the amount of freezing may be limited if the lighting is relatively dark, as in a high school gym.
Be aware that if you're shooting indoors you're going up against the laws of physics. The human eye can adapt much better than any camera. A high school gym will appear light enough once you've been inside for a few minutes, but it is much, much darker than a bright day outdoors.

Apr 28, 2012 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...


If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
steve_con_96.jpg
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.

steve_con_97.jpg

Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

I took a picture in the s mode or any mode messing with the shutter speed and when i go to view the picture i just get a black screen.....i am not sure why this is happening....any thoughts?


Proper exposure is a balancing act between the shutter speed and the aperture (the size of the opening in the lens). (There's also the ISO sensitivity, but I'll ignore that for now.) If the shutter is open for a longer time, the lens must be closed down. If the shutter is open for a shorter time, the lens must be opened up wider to allow the same amount of light to reach the sensor.

The Shutter priority mode attempts to adjust the aperture to give the proper exposure for the shutter speed you've selected. The lens has physical limits as to how wide the opening can be. If the shutter speed is too fast, the lens will only open as far as it can go but that may not be enough. In this case the camera will display "Lo" in the viewfinder to warn you but will go ahead and take the picture anyway. If the shutter speed is too fast then you won't get enough light through the lens and you'll end up with a dark or black picture.

Try reducing the shutter speed (leaving it open for a longer time), like 1/30 of a second instead of 1/125 of a second. If the shutter is open too long, you run the risk of camera motion. You can also increase the ISO setting, making the sensor more sensitive to light. This increases digital noise, which looks somewhat like film grain. You can also try adding more light, perhaps by using the flash, if the subject isn't too far from the camera.

Dec 18, 2010 | Nikon D3100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D200 has become nearly impossible to grab images


False low-battery warnings, focusing, and metering problems may be the result of poor contact between the body and certain lenses. Try removing your lens and thoroughly cleaning the contacts. I would recommend using a contact cleaner, but rubbing alcohol will also work. Remember that the whole ring needs to be cleaned. If that does not work, try scraping the battery contacts.

Feb 01, 2010 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shutters lags for 1-2 seconds then takes picture. Nikon D200. Thanks L.C


Does it still lag with the use of the flash?

Not sure this is a camera issue because I dont know the level of expertise you have with the functions of your camera or your knowledge of photography. So no insult intended...If your in low light or indoors, try using the flash or change to a higher ISO.

Does this help?

May 10, 2009 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera With 18-135MM

1 Answer

Dark Picture


I am assuming the following two things.

1. The part was indoors.
2. You are using the 18-135 mm lens with the Nikon D80.

The problem with shooting indoors is that not enough light goes in through the lens to the filter. Solutions:

1. Use the flash with every shot. In case there is not flashlight available, use the on board flash. Press the top button behind the barrel on the camera. It has a lighting icon. It will pop open the flash. If you are in 'P', 'A', 'S' mode, the camera will sync the shutter speed with flash. If the camera is on auto mode (The green camera icon) the flash will pop up and fire by itself.

2. Use the lens with with lowest f stop, i.e. with bigger aperture.

3. Increase ISO. You ought to get usable photographs right up to 800. To change ISO, press the button on the back of the camera which says 'ISO' (Second button from bottom) and turn the primary command dial simultaneously to change ISO setting. Higher ISO speed = Lower shutter speed (But less clarity too).

Hope it helps.

Satdeep

Jun 15, 2008 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

3 Answers

D200


what is the actual proablem?

Nov 17, 2007 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Nikon D200 Digital Camera With 18-135MM Logo

Related Topics:

124 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nikon Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

Greg Cann
Greg Cann

Level 3 Expert

1114 Answers

Are you a Nikon Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...