Question about Dell - NPS-460BB-B (NPS460BBB) Power Supply

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Test watt voltage

How to test out put voltage in this type of psu with out motherboard which pin in conector i can make jamper to check out put dc voltage

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Connecting two wires with a jumper will turn it on. Google the model to find out which wires.

Posted on Nov 29, 2013

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Show all solution to d945plrn motherboard problem not powering up


PSU IS OK? You're sure? You tested the 3 main voltages coming out?

DON'T rely on; "The LED lights are on, and the fans spin, so therefore the PSU must be good.

1) If ALL the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor uses 51 to 125 Watts of power.

With a Power Supply that has a weak voltage power rail, you will see LED's light, and fans spin; BUT not enough power to turn the Processor on.

Power Supply also needs to be plugged into motherboard to test, because you need a Load on the Power Supply.

PSU is KNOWN to be good? I mean KNOWN.
Not, "It's brand new so I know it has to be good"
Okay, moving on.

CPU OK?
How did you test it? Install on another working motherboard?

Are the Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard good?

http://capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lut7MX5Dd_A

Capacitors on the motherboard are used as Filters, and Voltage Regulators.
The ones used as Voltage Regulators are in the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit,

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/616

Part of what the Motherboard Voltage Regulator Circuit does, is to regulate voltage for the Processor. (CPU)

The CPU MUST have a steady, 'clean', supply of voltage, and it MUST be kept within the Processor's voltage tolerance range.
Too much, or too little, and the CPU shuts off. BIOS turns it off.

(CPU stands for Central Processing Unit. Another term used is Microprocessor, or simply Processor for short.
I know you are aware, just posting for all those who read the solution in the future)

http://downloadmirror.intel.com/15140/eng/D945PLRN_ProductGuide02_English.pdf

[Better motherboard due to the Intel Q965 motherboard chipset,

http://www.ebay.com/itm/INTEL-DQ965GF-CORE-2-DUO-LGA775-SOCKET-P-4-MOTHERBOARD-I-O-FACEPLATE-INCLUDED-/290863623024?_trksid=p2047675.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D11%26meid%3D5685984037376928917%26pid%3D100011%26prg%3D1005%26rk%3D1%26sd%3D330632928551%26

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_intel_chipsets#Core_2_chipsets

Scroll down to Q965 in left column ]

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 18, 2013 | Intel D945PLRN Motherboard

Tip

How to test your AC/DC Adapter or Computer Power Supply Unit.


A PSU or Power Supply Unit aka AC/DC adpater is then means by which a low tension (voltage) appliance receives its power from the 240 AV mains supply, the this is usually accompanied by the nominal current that is drawn from the PSU on load in milliamps. (e.g. 500mAmps = 0.5 Amps) most modern DC adapters are unregulated, where the output voltage is only regulated by the load current, and a smoothing Capacitor is sometimes used to reduce AC ripple on the DC Level.
If the PSU is regulated the DC Voltage that you measure using an AVO even off load will be the same as the rated current.

Also most, not all, are double insulated (indicated by small square inside a larger one) this means that it doesn't need a earth on the plug, the give away is a plastic pin instead of a metal one found in most domestic plugs with a 13A fuse.

Using Ohms Law P= I x V means that we can find out either the Current in Amps Power in Watts or the Voltage of any unit this is also called the VA rating

The Simple test is if the adapter gets really hot as soon as the you apply AC power then this may indicate catastrophic failure OR a dead short and you must turn OFF immediately the plastic may even start to melt, you may also smell electrical burning. This will also happen if you ever use a non-specific adapter on your device that has a different output voltage this will almost certianly cause damage to your device.

The main test if to test the step-down transformer using an AVO (Amps Volts Ohms) this is what is used to reduce the 240V ~AC voltage to something more in line with the required DC supply say 14-16V ~AC, a diode bridge converts this to DC, if it is regualted there will be either and either a zener or resistor drops this to the rated 12V and a capacitor to smooth the level.
You need to make sure this is socket is working correctly by checking with either a lamp electricians screw driver or a AC test plug, dont use this socket you have an earth fault or someother problem, usually two lines at the outside of a AC socket tester means all is correct.
  1. First measure the resistance (Ohms) across the two AC pins that is the Live and Neutral this should have VERY low resistance in the range 300 to 2,000 (2K) Ohms. if this is the case then your primary winding is probably OK if you see 1 on all settings this means open circuit (O/C)
  2. Then connect the power supply to a 240V AC socket, and check the output voltage with multimeter set at volts DC you should see a stable voltage of the rated value for a regulated adapter or slightly higher by about 5% if its unregulated as this is a reading off load, if you were able to test the voltage with the adapter on load you would see the rated DC voltage.
  3. If you connect an unregulated AC/DC adapter to the device and open up the cover to test it under load and the voltage is low around 5V or less then the adapter will need replacing even if the off load value appears correct in above test ( ** ref the table below)
NOTE: If you have a AC only output then the test done in 1 can also be done, if there is a diode bridge, Zener Dicde OR Capacitor on the secondary this test wont work so you might have to remove the cover by unscrewing the tamper-proof screws and test it before the connection to the PCB, without the power on of course, check out my tip HERE for help on how to remove the screws.

If you have a faulty power supply its usually the thermal fuse that blows on the secondary winding, this means that you will get considerably less Voltage at the output jack of around 5 VDC or less and falling if this is the case the transformer is faulty and will need to be replaced with one of the same step-down ratio. OR you will need a new AC/DC Adapter, check out this table for examples of the results that you might find.

f9329ce.jpg

** The Amstrad Black PSU that reports 24V and 383 Ohms on the primary may still not deliver the rated voltage under load and therefore I have marked this as a false positive and therefore FAULTY.

NOTE: The AC/DC Chargers are constant current devices (the symbol is usually two interlocking circles and even though you can do similar tests on the transformer primary coil its the current that it delivers under load that is important the only way to test this is using a clamp meter on the cable to see the current under load this should match the rated current.

COMPUTER ATX PSU

Most ATX power supplies are known as switched mode can only be tested under load when connected to the PC motherboard this is a bit tricky using a plain old Fluke, AVO or Multimeter the best way is to buy dedicated PSU tester for the type of Power Unit you have, it will check the DC voltages in the range + 12V,-12V,+5V,+5VBs and +3.3V on both the SATA and IDE supply cables these cost about £20 ($35) you can test the unit in as little as 5 mins.

on May 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

No debug LED show on my flaming blade gti


If your PSU give wrong voltage it produce same problem with 2 solution:
1-test your PSU
put a wire between green and black and voltage must be:
yellow 12V, red/purple/gray 5V, orange 3.3V.
If your PSU give under voltage (more than -10%):Buy a new one and test your motherboard(mb) with it (in this case there aren't a lot of chance that your mb and/or your CPU are dead)
If your PSU give good voltage:(-10% / +5%):There are a lot of chance that is you mb or CPU
If your PSU give over voltage:Buy a new one and test your motherboard with it (in this case there are a lot of chance that your mb or/and your CPU are dead)

Nov 19, 2012 | Foxconn Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Test a power supply


if your PSU starts (fan is spinning) you can test it with voltmeter. to check voltages for motherboard do next:
1. take PSU out of case
2. put power cable in
3. with some wire connect green and any black on MB connector on PSU (20/24 pins)
4. fan should start spinning
5. use voltmeter to check voltages

this is just basic. real PSU test is when you have device that will burden PSU while testing...

Nov 04, 2012 | Dell Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Mainboard: g31 m7 te - power: antec hcg750 - gpu: gtx560ti


No the mobo is compatible with the Power Supply, and GPU.
And vice-versa.

Mainboard fan???????
You mean the Processor (CPU) fan?

I'm guessing I guess, because computer case fans aren't on the motherboard/mainboard/mobo.
(MOtherBOard)

You're getting power to the mobo, but the question is how much?

1) IF ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use from 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Just depends on what Processor it is.

http://206.108.48.60/app/en/mb/introduction.php?S_ID=363&tab=1

The mobo will support Intel Core2 Quad-Core processors. Depending on which one, you may be talking about Up To 105 Watts of power,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Intel_Core_2_microprocessors#Quad-Core_Desktop_processors

This is why LED's can light, and fans may spin, but the Processor isn't getting enough power, so the computer will not turn on. (Processor isn't turning on)

Why?

1) Just because that Power Supply is new, doesn't mean it is good.
Sometimes you get a bad one. Test the three main voltages coming out, with a multimeter set to DC Voltage.

Need guidance post back in a Comment.
(An economical multimeter can be purchased, for as little as $8 to $12. I have seen cheaper. Available in a multitude of stores. An auto parts store is but one example )

2) You don't have the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugged in.
Goes to the white square 4-socket hole connector, to the left top corner of the Processor socket.
(Motherboard installed in computer case)

3) REQUIRES -> TWO 6-pin PCI-Express power cables, for the Nvidia GTX560Ti graphics card.

The Antec HCG750 PSU has 4 of them, so no problem there, IF you have two of them plugged into the graphics card.

Both connectors of the 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable's connector, need to be used. Biostar mobo requires a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371049

Post back in a Comment as to power cables plugged in, and DC Voltage test on PSU.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Aug 06, 2012 | Biostar G31-M7 TE Motherboard

2 Answers

Green LED on board is on but computer will not start


1) Check to see if the problem is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply, first.

Use a multimeter on the two wires coming from the Power On switch.
Perform a continuity test of the switch.

How?
An economical multimeter can be purchased, for as little as $8 to $12. Available in a multitude of stores. An auto parts store is but one example.

Make notes, and a drawing as to where those two wires go, on the Front panel header, on the motherboard. Then disconnect the two wires, and hold them in your hand.

Set the Function knob of the multimeter to OHM's. (1K, or 10K)
Touch the Positive (Red) probe lead of the multimeter to one wire.
Touch the Negative (Black) probe lead of the multimeter, to the other wire.
Press the Power On switch. (Button)

You should see a brief reading on the multimeter scale. (Or readout if the multimeter is digital)
It is brief because the Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch.

No reading? Bad ATX power on switch,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

Good reading? The Power Supply may be bad.
Test the three main voltages coming from the Power Supply.

[NOTE*
The Switched-Mode Power Supply, (SMPS), in your computer, is a power converter. It converts AC electricity from your home, or business, into three LOW DC voltages.

The shock hazard is IN the Power Supply's case. Not from the low DC voltages it produces ]

A) 3.3 Volt power rail
B) 5 Volt power rail
C) 12 Volt power rail

Test at the 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector,

http://usa.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_Socket_754/K8VX_SE/

Photo, shows the white, long 20-pin ATX main power cable connector, on the motherboard. No power cable plugged in.
Two rows of 10 socket holes.
(Above the blue Heatsink that sits on the Northbridge chip )

This is a general example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Power cable plugged in as shown in the right photo.
I suggest using a straightened out paper clip, and sticking it down in the socket for the power wire.
This is for the Positive (Red) probe lead of the multimeter, to touch to.

First voltage power wire check:
The multimeter function knob is set to DC Voltage. If just a symbol, the symbol is a dotted line, over a solid line.
IF there is more than one DC Voltage scale, for the Function knob to be set to, set it to the 0 - 50 Volt scale.

The straightened out paperclip, will go down into the BACK of the 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, RIGHT NEXT to the Orange wire.
Has to go down far enough, to go past the Orange insulation of the wire, and TOUCH the metal terminal down in the bottom.

[Looking at the middle photo, you can see the tips of the metal terminals I am referring to.
Uninstalled, and end not crimped over the wire's insulation, this is what they look like,

http://www.molex.com/molex/products/datasheet.jsp?part=active/0002081202_CRIMP_TERMINALS.xml&channel=Products&Lang=en-US

Left side shown, crimps over the insulation of the wire.
The far right side is what you are seeing the tip of, in the middle photo of the Playtool link ]

You can use ANY of the Orange wires you see. ALL are 3.3 Volt wires.
The Negative (Black) probe lead of the Multimeter, touches ANY Black wire.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires.
(Straightened out paperclip, also goes down in the Black wire's socket hole )

Put the straightened out paperclips in the appropriate socket holes, then plug the Power Supply into power. Press the Power On button, and start the Power Supply.

On the DC scale of the multimeter you should be reading VERY close to 3.3 Volts.

Good?
Go to ANY Red wire. ALL Red wires are 5 Volts (DC)
Positive (Red) probe lead of multimeter to straightened out paper clip, down into a socket hole, with ANY red wire.

Negative (Black) probe lead of multimeter to straightened out paperclip, in ANY socket hole with a Black wire.
Reading should be VERY close to 5 Volts. (DC)

Good?
Go to ANY Yellow wire. ALL Yellow wires are 12 Volts. (DC)
Reading should be VERY close to 12 Volts. (11.5 to 12 Volts)

ANY low reading means a bad Power Supply.

Primer:
1) If ALL of the LED lights were on at once, they would use less than 1 Watt of power.

2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power.

3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 watts of power.

From your brief diagnoses it looks to be a bad Power Supply.
barely enough to light the green LED light on the motherboard.
Not enough power to even spin fans, much less turn the Processor on.

Power Supply checks out?
Perform a visual check of the Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard. Look CLOSE, and you may need a light, and magnifying glass.

http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/index.htm

Capacitors on the motherboard are used as Filters, and Voltage Regulators.
The one's used as voltage regulators, are in the motherboard voltage regulator circuit.
Some of the one's used in the motherboard voltage regulator circuit, regulate voltage for the Processor.

A Processor MUST have a steady, 'clean', supply of Voltage, and it MUST be kept within a very 'tight' tolerance range. Cannot be too much, or too little, or BIOS will not turn the Processor on.
(Or if on, will not keep it on)

That's an old motherboard. Could be bad capacitors, but I'm more willing to bet on a bad Power Supply.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jul 23, 2012 | ASUS K8V-X SE Motherboard

1 Answer

So I just bought a Radeon HD 3450 graph card but after installing it in my ABIT IC7 motherboard the monitor doesn't display any signal upon starting the computer. Any ideas?


Test the card with another monitor first of all
I seem to think that this card requires a connection from the PSU ( check if there is a connection that would take a 12volt 4 pin molex or a floppy drive type power connector on the card)

Also, you should be running at least a 550 watt psu

Jul 18, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

5VSB IS MISSINIG FROM MOTHERBOARD CONECTOR . COMPUTER WILL NOT BOOT WHEN POWER SWITCH ON FRONT PANEL IDEPRESSED . NEED A SCHEMATIC AND COMPONENT DIAGRAM FOR THIS UNIT .


specs are here
http://www.antec.com/specs/SP500_spe.html
This includes 5VSB
There is more info here
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817103937
the ATX spec and 20+4 connector pinout (wich locates 5VSB got you) can be found in the Wikipedia article (section 3 in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATX#ATX_power_supply_revisions has pin out details for ATX rev 2.1).
If your psu is missing 5VSB it is defective and should be returned to manufacturer or retailer if within warranty period. See testing psu articles also.

Jan 19, 2011 | Antec SmartPower SP-500 (ASKU37152)...

1 Answer

I would like to know how to troubleshoot a brand new Ultra LS600 power supply. I would like to go beyond hearing "it's dead" since I am getting power to the motherboard (via indicator light)m but the PSU...


You can start the PSU manually with a paper clip.
Remove the 20 pin connector from the motherboard, leave the four pin power connectors attached to your various drives (this will provide a load on the power supply when it start up (provided it is not faulty).
Look at the 20 pin connector with the connector facing you.and the locking clip to your left.
The fourth pin from the bottom LH corner should be a green colour wire and the next two wires (5th & 6th pin) should be black and next to the locking clip.
Straighten a paper clip and insert it into the 4th pin and into the 5th or 6th pin (ie connect these wires together). These wires connect to the front panel switch to turn on your computer. You are testing the power supply only and since it is not connected to the motherboard the computer won't start.
Now connect the power unit to the mains and switch on the mains, if the power supply is OK the PSU fan should spin up and your hard disk should also spin up. If nothing happens the the PSU is faulty.
You can test the +5volts and +12volts supply on a 4 pin power connector with a multimeter. The red wire is +5volts and the yellow wire is +12volts and the black wires are negative (ground). The voltage readings should be within 5% of these voltages.
There are other voltages to be checked +3volts, -5volts, & -12volts. but these are not as critical.

Dec 05, 2008 | Ultra Products Ultra LS600 Lifetime Series...

1 Answer

Upgrading power supply


The next time you get a PSU. Tell them what you have. Apparently you got one that is not compatible with your compaq.The power (500 wattage) will work with your MB.
Get an OEM PSU from Compaq(HP).

Dec 02, 2007 | Compaq (253219-002) Motherboard

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